When is too much, too much?

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Nightsky

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When is too much, too much?
« on: January 17, 2018, 11:52:40 AM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
You can call me Gwyneth
I said that
Oh for the love of- Logical formulation:
FET is wrong, unsupported by evidence, and most models are refuted on multiple fronts; those that aren't tend not to make enough predictions to be realistically falsifiable
Jane said these

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totallackey

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 11:58:45 AM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Do you have a specific argument against the claim made by Mr. Davis?

Are you now standing in the corner rejecting NASA science?

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Nightsky

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2018, 12:00:48 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Do you have a specific argument against the claim made by Mr. Davis?

Are you now standing in the corner rejecting NASA science?
This has nothing to do with NASA!  More just basic chemistry and physics, and a wee bit biology.
Why are you people so preoccupied with NASA.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:03:02 PM by Nightsky »
You can call me Gwyneth
I said that
Oh for the love of- Logical formulation:
FET is wrong, unsupported by evidence, and most models are refuted on multiple fronts; those that aren't tend not to make enough predictions to be realistically falsifiable
Jane said these

?

totallackey

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2018, 12:03:31 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Do you have a specific argument against the claim made by Mr. Davis?

Are you now standing in the corner rejecting NASA science?
This has nothing to do with NASA!  More just basic chemistry and physics, and a wee bit biology.
So, you would not accept a source indicating NASA has detected just such an atmosphere on the moon?

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Nightsky

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2018, 12:10:29 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Do you have a specific argument against the claim made by Mr. Davis?

Are you now standing in the corner rejecting NASA science?
This has nothing to do with NASA!  More just basic chemistry and physics, and a wee bit biology.
So, you would not accept a source indicating NASA has detected just such an atmosphere on the moon?

Letís forget NASA and look at johnís a claim in particular the elements he lists.
 I repeat this has nothing to do with NASA.
You can call me Gwyneth
I said that
Oh for the love of- Logical formulation:
FET is wrong, unsupported by evidence, and most models are refuted on multiple fronts; those that aren't tend not to make enough predictions to be realistically falsifiable
Jane said these

?

totallackey

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2018, 12:18:57 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Do you have a specific argument against the claim made by Mr. Davis?

Are you now standing in the corner rejecting NASA science?
This has nothing to do with NASA!  More just basic chemistry and physics, and a wee bit biology.
So, you would not accept a source indicating NASA has detected just such an atmosphere on the moon?

Letís forget NASA and look at johnís a claim in particular the elements he lists.
 I repeat this has nothing to do with NASA.
I see the elements John lists:

"The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and Hydrogen." - as attributed to John Davis according to Nightsky

NASA states the same thing as far as I am aware (not that I agree with their statement either)...

So, am I to reject the OP as being:

1) fraudulent as not being based on current evidence?

2) fraudulent because the author is currently rejecting evidence the author would previously accept or offer in support of argumentation made in previous threads?
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:27:34 PM by totallackey »

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 12:24:08 PM »
Indeed, what a ludicrous claim.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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Slemon

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 02:45:57 PM »
Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is.
May I ask for your justification as to why his claim is wrong? That's a notable absence from your post.

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ER22

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2018, 04:39:59 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.

Not sure what you're going for here.
I don't have a masters in chemistry and I could not call bullshit on his claim.
Mostly cause I don't know.

The phrasing I have a problem with (If in fact he said it)
Is the moon has a growing atmosphere.
Kind of implies the moon atmosphere is growing.
Kinda actually says that.

What does this mean?
JD, over to you...
Show me a Flat Earth map that works.

Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2018, 05:30:13 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis

Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.

Not sure what you're going for here.
I don't have a masters in chemistry and I could not call bullshit on his claim.
Mostly cause I don't know.

The phrasing I have a problem with (If in fact he said it)
Is the moon has a growing atmosphere.
Kind of implies the moon atmosphere is growing.
Kinda actually says that.

What does this mean?
JD, over to you...

The moon's atmosphere is growing due to moonshramp farts.

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2018, 05:39:59 PM »
See? This is the kind of round earth malarky we have to deal with every day. "Moonshramp farts."

The fissuring continues and has not diminished as far as records and your theory shows.

Thanks Jane; I'd also love to hear the justification for why its wrong.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2018, 05:45:15 PM »
See? This is the kind of round earth malarky we have to deal with every day. "Moonshramp farts."

The fissuring continues and has not diminished as far as records and your theory shows.

Thanks Jane; I'd also love to hear the justification for why its wrong.

Are there or are there not moonshramp on the moon? Where is your evidence that they don't fart?

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2018, 05:46:58 PM »
What is a 'moonshramp'?
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2018, 05:50:44 PM »
What is a 'moonshramp'?

Use the search function.

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2018, 05:51:46 PM »
I'm asking you.

Professor, profess.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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rabinoz

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2018, 06:04:48 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis
Yes indeed, "the leading Zetetic scientist of our time" who has "advanced our knowledge of the universe more so than any one other person since Rowbotham himself" is technically correct to claim that:
"The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and Hydrogen".

Here are som references, Moon Fact Sheet or even Is There an Atmosphere on the Moon? .

And ;) Wikipedia, that ultimate authority says so.  ;) and Wikipedia is certainly a better authority than John Davis's "some say" and "everybody says"! So look at:
Quote from: Wikipedia
Atmosphere of the Moon
Composition
What little atmosphere the Moon has consists of some unusual gases, including sodium and potassium, which are not found in the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, or Venus. At sea level on Earth, each cubic centimeter of the atmosphere contains approximately 1019 molecules; by comparison the lunar atmosphere contains fewer than 106 molecules in the same volume. On Earth, this is considered to be a very good vacuum. In fact, the density of the atmosphere at the Moon's surface is comparable to the density of the outermost fringes of Earth's atmosphere, where the International Space Station orbits.

The elements sodium and potassium have been detected in the Moon's atmosphere using Earth-based spectroscopic methods, whereas the isotopes radon-222 and polonium-210 have been inferred from data obtained by the Lunar Prospector alpha particle spectrometer.[6] Argon-40, helium-4, oxygen and/or methane (CH4), nitrogen (N2) and/or carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2)) were detected by in-situ detectors placed by the Apollo astronauts.

The average daytime abundances of the elements known to be present in the lunar atmosphere, in atoms per cubic centimeter, are as follows:
Argon: 20,000Ė100,000, Helium: 5,000Ė30,000, Neon: up to 20,000, Sodium: 70, Potassium: 17 and Hydrogen: fewer than 17.

This yields approximately 80,000 total atoms per cubic centimeter, marginally higher than the quantity posited to exist in the atmosphere of Mercury. While this greatly exceeds the density of the solar wind, which is usually on the order of just a few protons per cubic centimeter, it is virtually a vacuum in comparison with the atmosphere of the Earth.

From: Atmosphere of the Moon
See John Davis is "technically" correct, though as usual he tries to be as misleading as possible!
But John Davis's atmosphere on the moon would be classed as an extremely good vacuum on earth.

Quote from: Nightsky
Now you donít need a masters in chemistry to see what utter bullshit that claim is. The problem is John Davis periodically makes these claims, yet calls himself a scientist. The question is is it permissible to make far fetched claims with no evidence. Incidentally he claims thatís what the moon shrimp feed on when not eating each other.
Oh yes, John Davis is a "scientist", a Computer Scientist.

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Slemon

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 06:31:43 PM »
On a recent thread zetetic scientist John Davis made a claim that the moon has a growing atmosphere composed of, and I quote.

The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and HydrogenĒ
John Davis
Yes indeed, "the leading Zetetic scientist of our time" who has "advanced our knowledge of the universe more so than any one other person since Rowbotham himself" is technically correct to claim that:
"The lunar atmosphere consists of Argon, Helium, Neon, Sodium, Potassium, and Hydrogen".
Shh, don't tell him that, I wanted to see how he'd deny it.

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Shifter

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2018, 06:33:16 PM »
Is it too much NightSky? If it is, I suggest you crawl back into your safe space to prevent you from being triggered again.


Member of the BOTD for Anti Fascism and Racism

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2018, 07:00:15 PM »
If I'm wrong, please let me know why. NASA always puts a bit of truth in theirs lies; if you pay attention.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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rabinoz

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2018, 08:12:34 PM »
If I'm wrong, please let me know why. NASA always puts a bit of truth in theirs lies; if you pay attention.
As you put a little bit of truth in your posts. You just leave put the bit about the pressure on the moon being low enough to be classed as a very good vacuum on earth.

And falsely accusing others of lying doesn't bother you when they're not here to put you right.

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John Davis

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Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2018, 08:20:08 PM »
I didn't leave that out at all. You are the one that has been going about accusing me of lying (for demonstrable example - this very instance) and not showing that I have.

Shame on you.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: When is too much, too much?
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2018, 03:46:42 PM »
Iím a bit late on the scene but from picking together the rather flaky arguments it looks like John Davis is basing his argument on the moon having an atmosphere from data supplied by an Apollo 17 moon based experiment
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/lunar-atmosphere.html

Now forgive me but I thought that he and other flat earthers deny that any moon mission took place. How can he therefore use data supplied by a mission that he denies happened? How can he also use data from a mission that scortches his other beliefs about the moon.

I think we need some clarification here from Mr Davis.

I think we also need to get the facts right on this moon atmosphere. In fact, the density of the atmosphere at the moon's surface is comparable to the density of the outermost fringes of Earth's atmosphere where the International Space Station orbits, so hardly an atmosphere as we understand one.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/lunar-atmosphere.html