Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure

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I believe that den pressure is at odds with hydrogen bonds found in water.  And den pressure is at odds with the reality that water can hang from a ceiling as a water droplet.  Not falling.  Until the water droplet gains enough mass from condensation to have gravity overcome water’s properties of adhesion and cohesion. 

Quote
Detailed Description
Cohesion: Hydrogen Bonds Make Water Sticky
Water has an amazing ability to adhere (stick) to itself and to other substances. The property of cohesion describes the ability of water molecules to be attracted to other water molecules, which allows water to be a "sticky" liquid.
Hydrogen bonds are attractions of electrostatic force caused by the difference in charge between slightly positive hydrogen ions and other, slightly negative ions. In the case of water, hydrogen bonds form between neighboring hydrogen and oxygen atoms of adjacent water molecules. The attraction between individual water molecules creates a bond known as a hydrogen bond.

https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/strong-polar-bond-between-water-molecules-creates-water-cohesion#:~:text=In%20the%20case%20of%20water,known%20as%20a%20hydrogen%20bond.


Water stuck on a window?  Not running down?

Water stuck to the ceiling not dripping?

Water can stick to windows and overhangs and not fall because of “Hydrogen bonds are attractions of electrostatic force”.


Let’s take a water drop on a ceiling.  The hydrogen bond that makes water “sticky” allows it to hold on and not drip. The forces of cohesion and adhesion with the water drop and the ceiling is greater than the force of gravity on the water droplet.

  If the water drop continues to accumulate mass through say condensation, gravity
will finally have enough force to overcome the water droplet’s cohesion and adhesion with the ceiling, and the water drop will fall.

So.  In den pressure.  How can a water droplet stick to the underside of a ceiling.  Then when the water droplet is massive enough, what in den pressure overcomes the forces of cohesion and adhesion with the water droplet and ceiling to make it fall?  There is no atmosphere between the water droplet and ceiling.


Note.  Added.  In den pressure there can’t be free space.  So as the water droplet starts to fall and pull away from the ceiling.  In den pressure how can it fall.  I guess den pressure everything is occupied by something.  So how does the water droplet pull away from the ceiling to fall? 
« Last Edit: May 15, 2023, 09:32:50 AM by DataOverFlow2022 »

Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2023, 10:15:58 AM »
Why do you keep splitting off from previous threads? We're up to 5 threads actively discussing denpressure, and you started 4 of them. This would work as a point in the pinboard thread. The pinboard was a point that was being made in the experiment ideas thread, which was branched off the flight thread. I don't even know where you got the N2 02 thread from. This seems excessive. I disagree with Scepti, but do you enjoy shitting on him this much?
« Last Edit: May 15, 2023, 04:29:58 PM by Magicalus »

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
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Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2023, 09:00:34 PM »
This one has also been answered in the other topic so my participation also ceases after this post in another desperate topic.
 :P

Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2023, 12:57:56 PM »
This one has also been answered in the other topic so my participation also ceases after this post in another desperate topic.
 :P

Then it should be easy for you to cite and link.

But don’t remember you ever covering how lack of atmosphere between the water droplet and the ceiling can make the droplet fall.

Don’t remember you coving how gravity explains how the droplet gains enough mass until there is a point gravity can overcome the adhesion and cohesion of the water droplet.  Yet the water never changes density.  So, why in the den pressure delusion wouldn’t the adhesive and cohesive properties of water cause it to uniformly cover a window or ceiling before it could form drops and fall.  How can water with a specific density hang there in den pressure, the water not change density and pool into a drop, and still not change density have the water droplet finally fall from the forces of adhesion and cohesion finally being overcame by another force to make the water droplet fall?

But the answer is it takes a force like gravity to overcome the forces of cohesion and adhesion.  Density is not a force, and it offers nothing in the way of overcoming the cohesion and adhesion of the water droplet stuck to the ceiling.

Another shortcoming of den pressure.  Forces are not broken.  The forces are always there.  They are just overcame by another force or by adding something like kinetic energy.  I get break is easy figurative language.  But the reality is forces are always there relative to other forces. 
« Last Edit: May 16, 2023, 01:01:52 PM by DataOverFlow2022 »

Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2023, 11:12:22 AM »
Quote from: sceptimatic link=topic=91690.msg2403504#m

It can't gain mass without gaining density.


Really.


Easily proven false.

So, one drop of water gains enough mass in your delusion to increase its density so much the water drop falls?

Setup for simple experiment.



An empty graduated cylinder on a scale with the weight of the cylinder zeroed.  The graduated cylinder reads 0 to 50 ml in one ml increments.

Using your den pressure delusion.  What should the density of water be at 23.2 degrees Celsius.  City tap water.

What should the weight in grams modeling with the den pressure delusion be for water at 5ml, 10ml, 20ml, and 50ml.  For your delusion, what should be the increase in density from 5 ml of water to 50 ml of water?

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Username

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Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2023, 11:56:29 AM »
This one has also been answered in the other topic so my participation also ceases after this post in another desperate topic.
 :P

Then it should be easy for you to cite and link.
Please use the search function.
The illusion is shattered if we ask what goes on behind the scenes.

Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2023, 02:09:10 PM »
This one has also been answered in the other topic so my participation also ceases after this post in another desperate topic.
 :P

Then it should be easy for you to cite and link.
Please use the search function.



Ran a search for cohesion and sceptimatic


Got three results.  Two are from my threads.

One was from today.

The other post was by sceptimatic demanding me to change the subject.

The third was…

Has anyone ever picked up 2 flat boards or whatever - and found that as you pick up the top board, the bottom board is stuck to it and yet all that's between them is a very small covering of water moisture.

I'd like to see people's explanations as to why that happens. I'd like to see the explanations in simple terms from the words of the person and not by looking at google or any other reference.

Let's see what answers you come up with as to why it happens. Maybe this can be another way to help prove what I'm saying. Or maybe not with the stubborn ones or the hypnotised ones, or the paid ones.

Maybe some genuine ones might come up with reality.

Let's go.

You don't need moisture.
Take two clean pieces of fine glass. For example two pocket mirrors without frames.
Wash off grease from fingers, using some rubbing alcohol. Or wash with dish detergent and dry out.
Do not touch surface again.

Stack them on top of each other, and "plop" vacuum-held kitchen rag-holder on the center of the top one.
Press them together for a moment, then pull top one up about ten inches, then stop.

Movement of the top glass will try to create partial vacuum between them, but atmospheric pressure will push bottom glass up.

Yes, UP.

Air won't instantly get between them at the moment you start pulling.
It will take time and pieces of glass will start separating with delay.

If there is a bit of moisture between them, spread well by initial pressure, adhesion force between
water and glass will keep glass pieces together, together with air perssure on bottom glass from below,
as long as you keep it horizontal. Small tilt or shake, and bottom glass slides aside, reduces contact surface
and falls back down.

BEWARE OF SHATTERED GLASS, or glass chips from edges.
Do this on some thick fabric (like carpet or not-too-thin table cover),
not on hard surfaces (like marble table).

The same adhesion force between glass and water holds drops in place on wet window.
Small drops stay where they are until dry out.
Bigger drops are heavier and slide (roll) down, leaving trail of water taken from them again
by same adhesion force along their way down the glass.
Surface Tension reshapes individual portions of the trail back into drop shape.

Google for "Adhesion vs Cohesion", and for "Surface Tension".
Come back to me when you learn to actually type from your own fingers.
No wonder you people can never understand anything.

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: Water hanging from ceiling. Highlighting den pressure failure
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2023, 02:10:03 PM »
This one has also been answered in the other topic so my participation also ceases after this post in another desperate topic.
 :P

Then it should be easy for you to cite and link.
Please use the search function.

And what would he be searching.  His question or scepti's none answer he has continually posted all over the forums.
Rabinoz RIP

That would put you in the same category as pedophile perverts like John Davis, NSS, robots like Stash, Shifter, and victimized kids like Alexey.