Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #330 on: June 19, 2016, 04:29:22 PM »
June summer solstice full moon is rare and unpredictable...and whose light will be upon those who would venture outdoors during the event.

This is not much harder to predict than any other full moon. According to this website, the last full moon on the same GMT day as the June solstice was 1967, almost 50 years ago, and the next will be in 2062. If, by same day, you mean both events occur within 24 hours of each other - that is, it's the same day in at least one time zone - then it's more common, occurring about once every 19 years. Whether once in 19 years (or even once every 50) is "rare" or not depends, of course, on your definition of "rare"[nb]Transits of Venus, for instance, usually occur twice about every 143 years; the reappearance of Halley's Comet is once about every 76 years.[/nb]; at any rate, this is expected.

Regardless, for the superstitious types that don't like being out under the full moon, rejoice! Since the full moon is always on the opposite side of the ecliptic as the Sun, the Moon will be up the shortest amount of time of the entire year on this night while full (in the northern hemisphere)![nb]For you poor bastards south of the equator, it will be up the longest of any full moon this year, but then, it's not a summer solstice for you, so that mystical property, whatever it is, will be absent.[/nb]

Everyone needs to keep calm and carry on.
 
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #331 on: June 19, 2016, 04:37:53 PM »
He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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Woody

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #332 on: June 19, 2016, 04:40:53 PM »
He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.

A strawberry moon can not be bad since strawberries are a delicious treat.

Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #333 on: June 19, 2016, 05:46:18 PM »
June summer solstice full moon is rare and unpredictable...

He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.

"... is rare and unpredictable..." hmmm...

Maybe "... is rare and has unpredictable effects..." is what he meant to say. Context suggests otherwise, but that could be offered as an interpretation when pressed, I suppose. One of the hallmarks of mysticism is trying to remain vague enough that alternative meanings can be justified when a more obvious one turns out to be wrong.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #334 on: June 20, 2016, 03:38:24 PM »
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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #335 on: June 20, 2016, 03:39:17 PM »
He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.

A strawberry moon can not be bad since strawberries are a delicious treat.

That's what they want you to think  >:(
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #336 on: June 21, 2016, 12:35:30 PM »
He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.

A strawberry moon can not be bad since strawberries are a delicious treat.

That's what they want you to think  >:(


Damn "they" !

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gotham

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #337 on: September 15, 2016, 07:19:42 PM »
On the verge of a full moon. Will have to see if additional hydration is recommended during the event?  May be adding water or maybe something with electrolytes to the preparation list...just in case it's needed, as they say.

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #338 on: October 16, 2016, 03:52:53 PM »
Supermoon tonight! WEAR YOUR GOGGLES.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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robintex

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #339 on: October 16, 2016, 04:18:24 PM »
On the verge of a full moon. Will have to see if additional hydration is recommended during the event?  May be adding water or maybe something with electrolytes to the preparation list...just in case it's needed, as they say.

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Nightsky

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Re: Moonlight: Preparation & Precautions
« Reply #340 on: November 02, 2016, 12:39:32 PM »
Moonlight: Preparation & Precautions


Of course, the natural response when presented with such compelling evidence is to ask how one can avoid the risks posed by Lunar rays. Unfortunately, the Moon is an almost ever-present feature of our lives, and it emits its injurious beams for a considerable period almost every twenty-four hours.


The most important step, therefore, is to be aware of when such emissions are most likely to take place. Thankfully the Moon's emanations are regular, and therefore with sufficient research can be predicted, so that one can take steps to avoid it when it is most dangerous. Depending on your location, the apparent state of the Lunar cycle may vary, so we advise that you conduct independent, Zetetically rigorous research, preferably through remote means such as video cameras or specialized means of filtrating and projecting its light. You will soon record a cycle lasting approximately nine and-a-half days, punctuated by varying but regular degrees of Lunar emissions.


As the above research indicates that the harmful effects of the Moon correspond with the quantity of Moonlight to which one is exposed, the Full Moon is obviously particularly dangerous, as indeed are the Waxing and Waning Gibbous. Exposure to Moonlight during these periods should be kept to a bare minimum, and ideally should be limited to situations where contact is either necessary or unavoidable. The Waxing and Waning Crescent are obviously less dangerous, but nevertheless it is advised that one should not be foolhardy, as the limited amount of light produced by the Moon during these periods will be more than offset by any extensive exposure.


During the standard Lunar cycle, keeping regular hours and remaining indoors after dark should be enough to prevent illness in the majority of cases. However, many people may find themselves in situations where they are forced to expose themselves to Moonlight. In such cases, noted Zetetic James MacIntyre has the following advice:


When viewing the Moon, or expecting to face exposure to the Moon, please try to follow these procedures:

  • Wear sunglasses - Dark glasses may protect your eyes, which are particularly sensitive, from Moon rays which can damage your eyes.
  • Cover any exposed skin - Cases of Moonlight exposure to bare skin can be particularly severe. Always wear long sleeves, gloves and a hat. A balaclava or thick scarf can protect your nose, mouth, cheeks and ears from the Moon.


He also advises that even when one is inside, one should ensure that your shelter is adequately sealed and protected:


  • Protect your home - Moonlight can seep in through uncovered windows, doors and skylights. Make sure that you have thick curtains, or, better still, shutters on major windows which are likely to face the Moon. You may find it useful to tape reflective material, such as aluminium foil (shiny side out) on gaps in your home, or even on the windows themselves, in order to improve Moon-protection further.


Finally, one should take precautions to ensure the safety of any other biological life for which you may be responsible:


  • Make sure your pets are safe - The Moon can hurt animals just as much as humans. Consider bringing your pets indoors during the evening, or if you intend to let them roam the night, you may want to wrap them up in protective clothing just as you did with yourself!
  • Watch out for plants - Moonlight can putrefy many varieties of unsuspecting garden plant. Most flowers close their petals at night in order to protect them from Moon rays, but during the Super-harvest Moon this may not be enough. You may want to cover even self-defending flowers and other plants with aluminium foil or another protective material.


Though such measures should prove sufficent during the standard Lunar cycle, there are also occasional spikes in Lunar radiance, notably events such as the Super Moon and Super Harvest Moon. Though rare, during these events the Moon's intensity is noticeably greater, and thus its effects are especially powerful. During these crises, MacIntyre suggests that "it may be safer to stay indoors entirely and avoid exposure". Indeed, some have even suggested that such events may cause an increase in the number of natural disasters here on Earth. Accordingly, it may best to store or stockpile the following items:


  • Several days worth of clean water, uncontaminated by Lunar rays. Filling spare bottles, baths and sinks before hand is a useful strategy.
  • Proteinous tinned food and vegetables, along with any other non-perishables.
  • A portable gas stove with plenty of spare gas cannisters.
  • A fully-equipped first-aid kit.
  • An emergency heat source, and sufficient blankets and other insulative materials.
  • At least two high-quality flashlights, with plenty of spare batteries. If disaster strikes, you may be without electricity, and (for obvious reasons) you will be unable to navigate by Moonlight - indeed you should be sealed off in complete darkness. Make sure to have several high-quality flashlights that will run efficiently and reliably.
  • At least one multi-tool, and ideally a decent knife and perhaps a folding saw and hatchet.
  • Depending on the situation, it may be advisable to stock several firearms and plenty of ammunition, depending on local laws. Natural disasters often bring out the worst in some people, and under the deleterious influence of a Super (Harvest) Moon it could be even worse. Do not seek violence, but be prepared to defend you and your family from the exposed.


So that our members are aware of such crises, we will endeavour to keep an updated list of immanent Super Moon events, detailing the date, duration and (when possible) intensity of these spikes in Lunar activity.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #341 on: November 02, 2016, 01:48:51 PM »
Are you being serious?  Wilmore posted that 5 years ago, and you think the conspiracy has not taken him out yet? 

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #342 on: November 09, 2016, 09:07:00 AM »
Beware the Beaver Moon!
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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rabinoz

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #343 on: November 09, 2016, 02:00:08 PM »
He didn't mean it's hard to predict when it will occur, lol.

The strawberry moon might be more dangerous than other moons.

A strawberry moon can not be bad since strawberries are a delicious treat.

That's what they want you to think  >:(

Yes certainly "strawberries are a delicious treat" and the the cream protects from those dangerous rays. Wearing 8) helps too. 8)

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #344 on: November 09, 2016, 02:03:05 PM »
Strawberry moon is over, rabinoz. The deadly Beaver Moon is nearly upon us.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #345 on: November 09, 2016, 02:23:32 PM »
I do wonder how FET explains this though:


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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #346 on: November 09, 2016, 02:26:14 PM »
Sometimes the moon is closer, sometimes it's farther away.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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RocksEverywhere

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #347 on: November 09, 2016, 03:25:35 PM »
Sometimes the moon is closer, sometimes it's farther away.
It's almost like people can make sense here sometimes.

Mind = blown
AMA: https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=68045.0

Just because you don't understand something, doesn't mean it's not real.

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rabinoz

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #348 on: November 09, 2016, 04:28:26 PM »
Sometimes the moon is closer, sometimes it's farther away.
Eureka! I finally understand what the Wiki means by:
Quote
The Phases of the Moon
The lunar phases vary cyclically according to the changing geometry of the Moon and Sun, which are constantly wobbling up and down and exchange altitudes as they rotate around the North Pole.

When the moon is below the sun's altitude the moon is dark and a New Moon occurs.

When the moon is above the altitude of the sun the moon is fully lit and a Full Moon occurs.

So according to the  ::) highest authority in the land  ::) when the moon is at its highest point "a Full Moon occurs".

So these predictions of a very large full moon on Nov 14 must be wrong, on that date, the moon is only about 363,400 km away.
"The Wiki" could  ;D NEVER be wrong, no never  ;D! Maybe it's a very large New Moon!

So according to "the Wiki" the next Full Moon must be around Nov 28, when the moon will be about 405,500 km away, about as far as it gets.

Now, should anyone doubt these distances, I invite them to measure the distance to the moon on those dates and come back with actual measurements.

Of course, it will be easy to check if "the Wiki" is right about
         "When the moon is below the sun's altitude the moon is dark and a New Moon occurs" and
         "When the moon is above the altitude of the sun the moon is fully lit and a Full Moon occurs".
Just leave you "Wiki", "ENaG", etc and poke your head outside and have a look on Nov 14 and Nov 28.

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #349 on: November 09, 2016, 04:32:53 PM »
Settle down, rab. People have been complaining about the wiki forever.

Look, sometimes a beaver makes the moon super dangerious, OK?
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #350 on: November 09, 2016, 04:49:47 PM »
Good thing we have idiots like rabinoz to constantly insist that the wiki needs to be changed.  We would have never known. 

Seriously, if you think something needs to be changed, then type up a correction and submit it to, well, anyone.  If we think you have a better explanation than the current wiki, then we will change it.  If you are unwilling to even do this, then shut the f*ck up about it.  You are a broken record repeating the same crap over and over again. 

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rabinoz

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #351 on: November 09, 2016, 09:01:07 PM »
Good thing we have idiots like rabinoz to constantly insist that the wiki needs to be changed.  We would have never known. 

Seriously, if you think something needs to be changed, then type up a correction and submit it to, well, anyone.  If we think you have a better explanation than the current wiki, then we will change it.  If you are unwilling to even do this, then shut the f*ck up about it.  You are a broken record repeating the same crap over and over again.
::)  And you don't have better explanations for lunar phases?  ::)

All I can do is point out the errors, I can hardly be expected to find impossible solutions.

Not my problem! Even Ski acknowledge's that Voliva's "calcuation" of 3,000 miles and and Rowbotham's "calcuation" of 700 mile's for the height of the sun "of Rev. Voliva and Dr. Rowbotham can't possibly be correct".
See
Why? Are you talking about the distances involved? Because I'd agree that the classical numbers of Rev. Voliva and Dr. Rowbotham can't possibly be correct.

Also on the "perspective" explanation of sunsets:
The "squishing" of the sun at the horizon is just Rowbotham's perspective at play. I definitely agree that perspective is insufficient to account for the sunset, however, if that is your argument.

The maintenance of the accuracy of "the Wiki" has nothing to do with me, but having obvious fallacies in it makes the Flat Earth look unnecessarily ridiculous. But, don't ask me for better explanations.

As I said, not my problem!

I do have a very simple explanation for all these thing, but a lot of people seem too blinkered to see it.

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Twerp

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #352 on: November 10, 2016, 12:20:21 AM »
Good thing we have idiots like rabinoz to constantly insist that the wiki needs to be changed.  We would have never known. 

Seriously, if you think something needs to be changed, then type up a correction and submit it to, well, anyone.  If we think you have a better explanation than the current wiki, then we will change it.  If you are unwilling to even do this, then shut the f*ck up about it.  You are a broken record repeating the same crap over and over again.

I'm not Rab but I would like to submit a suggestion that we update the wiki to state that the earth is globular. Please consider this my submission.
“Heaven is being governed by Devil nowadays..” - Wise

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #353 on: November 13, 2016, 03:10:14 PM »
Please use extreme caution when viewing the deadly Beaver Moon.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #354 on: January 22, 2017, 11:22:09 PM »
Please use extreme caution when viewing the deadly Beaver Moon.

Or even viewing beavers by moonlight....can be very dangerous.

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Gumby

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #355 on: January 23, 2017, 10:53:01 AM »
Please use extreme caution when viewing the deadly Beaver Moon.

Or even viewing beavers by moonlight....can be very dangerous.

To be safe you need to hide inside a crate.

It's a known fact that the moon light has a particular wavelenght that causes several afflictions.
I recommend a diet of water boiled for 12 minutes left to cool in dark place. This water will block the moonlight in your organism. If water catches moonlight must be boiled again. 

The harmfull wavelength is produced by decomposing cheese on the moon surface.
How dumb can you be?
I think MH370 was hijacked and the persons who did the hijacking were indeed out to prove a flat earth.

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #356 on: February 09, 2017, 03:12:13 PM »
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/comet-eclipse-and-full-moon-light-friday-night-180962086/

Quote
This time of year, cabin fever often starts to set in across much of North America as the late days of winter set in. But on Friday, there’s a great excuse—actually several excuses—for venturing outdoors. That’s because there will be a penumbral eclipse, a full moon and a fly-by of an emerald green comet all on the same night.

The unusual celestial triple play begins early Friday evening, reports Weather.com. Starting at 5:34 P.M. eastern time, people along the east coast will be able to observe a penumbral lunar eclipse, when the sun, moon and earth all align. Unlike a total eclipse, in which the Earth casts a cone-shaped shadow, or umbra, that blacks out the moon, the effect of a penumbral eclipse is more subtle, reports Deborah Byrd at EarthSky.com. The face of the moon will slowly darken several shades over time as it passes through the penumbra, the more diffuse area on the edge of the shadow cone.

According to Bruce McClure at EarthSky.com, the ideal spots to view this particular eclipse are in Europe, Africa, Greenland and Iceland and that the entire eclipse will last four hours and 20 minutes. In North America, the period of greatest eclipse will take place at 7:44 P.M. local time.
...
Quote
The second cosmic event taking place on Friday is the Full “Snow” Moon, which lights up the sky every February. Doyle Rice at USA Today explains that the name was given to the moon by Native Americans as part of a system used to keep track of the seasons. He reports that the name Snow Moon is pretty apt, since on average February is the snowiest month in the United States. There’s also an alternate name, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac; it's also called the Full Hunger Moon because tough weather made hunting difficult during this time of year.

Anyone not too tuckered out by watching the eclipse can try and wait up (or get up early) for the third event, a flyby of comet Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková—the so-called New Year Comet. Weather.com reports that the comet will be visible with binoculars in the predawn hours when it passes through the constellation Hercules.

Please, if you're out there Friday night watching the sky, USE PROTECTION.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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gotham

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #357 on: March 11, 2017, 12:38:21 PM »
Worm moon approaching. Cover open soil to protect them and then take proper measures for humans. 

They rely on us and we them.

All should be clear by Monday.

 

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Shifter

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #358 on: April 06, 2017, 11:55:26 PM »
OMG I just read this. Now I feel like all the times I have held my kid up high to look at the moon, has actually been child abuse  ??? :'(
RIP rabinoz. Forum legend

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Twerp

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Re: Moonlight: Dangers & Precautions
« Reply #359 on: April 07, 2017, 12:12:37 AM »
OMG I just read this. Now I feel like all the times I have held my kid up high to look at the moon, has actually been child abuse  ??? :'(

That is bad! It may not affect them right away but eventually they will turn on you! Probably in their teens.
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