The Universe is perfectly flat

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Ryan Onessence

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  • All and neither; make of it what you will
http://soundcloud.com/orin-zolis/sets/world-music-ethnic-beats/

Knowledge gained via academic means and intelligence are not mutually inclusive. Those who assume authority and superiority over conventionally uneducated persons would be wiser to keep this in mind.

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momentia

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Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #32 on: September 02, 2011, 01:46:48 PM »
Yes, the universe is globally flat as best we can tell. I don't get what everyone is arguing about.
But the standard model of science (globularist science, but this is an aside) is that things tend to form spheres due to gravity and that for surface area they have the most volume. Why should something infinitely large (i.e the universe) be any different? Do make your minds up.

I'm not talking about mass, which does tend to conglomerate and form local deviations in space-time, but about space-time itself, on a universal scale, which seems to be flat. In other words, if you drew a large circle that is comparable to the size of the universe, the circumference of that circle would be 2πR .

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Ryan Onessence

  • 325
  • All and neither; make of it what you will
Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #33 on: September 02, 2011, 03:55:19 PM »
Yes, the universe is globally flat as best we can tell. I don't get what everyone is arguing about.
But the standard model of science (globularist science, but this is an aside) is that things tend to form spheres due to gravity and that for surface area they have the most volume. Why should something infinitely large (i.e the universe) be any different? Do make your minds up.

I'm not talking about mass, which does tend to conglomerate and form local deviations in space-time, but about space-time itself, on a universal scale, which seems to be flat. In other words, if you drew a large circle that is comparable to the size of the universe, the circumference of that circle would be 2πR .

just to clarify ...I'm not laughing at you, just the irony of the phrase
http://soundcloud.com/orin-zolis/sets/world-music-ethnic-beats/

Knowledge gained via academic means and intelligence are not mutually inclusive. Those who assume authority and superiority over conventionally uneducated persons would be wiser to keep this in mind.

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Around And About

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Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #34 on: September 02, 2011, 04:03:10 PM »
The question is, where did Agnostic get the "perfectly flat" idea from? Was it in a brochure sales pitch? Flatties are suckers for those.
I'm not black nor a thug, I'm more like god who will bring 7 plagues of flat earth upon your ass.

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Hazbollah

  • Flat Earth Editor
  • 2444
  • Earth Shape Apathetic.
Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2011, 03:36:26 AM »
Yes, the universe is globally flat as best we can tell. I don't get what everyone is arguing about.
But the standard model of science (globularist science, but this is an aside) is that things tend to form spheres due to gravity and that for surface area they have the most volume. Why should something infinitely large (i.e the universe) be any different? Do make your minds up.

I'm not talking about mass, which does tend to conglomerate and form local deviations in space-time, but about space-time itself, on a universal scale, which seems to be flat. In other words, if you drew a large circle that is comparable to the size of the universe, the circumference of that circle would be 2πR .
Obvious statement of the month?
Always check your tackle- Caerphilly school of Health. If I see an innuendo in my post, I'll be sure to whip it out.

Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #36 on: September 05, 2011, 02:33:56 AM »
I used to live in a 2 bedroom flat.

Re: The Universe is perfectly flat
« Reply #37 on: September 27, 2011, 08:47:00 PM »
The "flatness" in question isn't the flatness associated with say a piece of paper, it is a description of the overall curve of space-time. With any curvature, you would still have 3 dimensions to move in and objects could be anywhere in that 3D space. If the universe is has positive, then space-time can be described as a sort of 4 dimensional sphere, with 3 dimensions of space and one of time. A negatively curves universe would look like a saddle with space-time spreading away from itself. In a "flat" universe, the warping of space-time is virtually non-existent and would more or less look like a regular 3D space.
You, sir, can't comprehend the idea of bottoms.