Water rotation/circumnavigation/gravity

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Water rotation/circumnavigation/gravity
« on: May 12, 2024, 10:11:40 PM »
I am arguing with someone who is very smart,(not that I am not smart, but Science isn't my bag... I just trust my gut and the things I see around me... but I digress...) and they want to know why the water rotates when it goes down the drain if we are on a flat earth. Also, why do G forces happen if there is not gravity at play, also why someone was able to go around the earth in 180 days if we aren't a globe. She keeps making the argument that if we start at one point and travel in any cardinal direction we will return to the starting point. How is this possible on a flat earth? I know these are a lot of questions,but I am new to this and I figured someone could start with at least one. Thanks. 

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gnuarm

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Re: Water rotation/circumnavigation/gravity
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2024, 11:13:38 PM »
I am arguing with someone who is very smart,(not that I am not smart, but Science isn't my bag... I just trust my gut and the things I see around me... but I digress...) and they want to know why the water rotates when it goes down the drain if we are on a flat earth.

The whole water rotating thing is vastly over stated.  This is supposed to be due to the Coriolis effect, but is very, very tiny force in any sink or bathtub.  Typically the rotation starts because of random forces.  I saw a video about this, where there's a demonstration of how the drain spins one way, just north of the equator and the other way, just south of the equator.  This small displacement from the equator produces far too small a force to do anything, even remotely reliably.  In fact, the videographers found that both setups were a bit south of the true equator.  The people performing the demonstration (and "performing" is the right word) were "forcing" the rotation by the way they poured the water into the tub from a bucket.  It only takes a bit of a sideways slant while pouring, to create a bit of rotation.  So, in reality, they could create any rotation in any tub they wanted. 


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Also, why do G forces happen if there is not gravity at play,

G forces in general have nothing to do with gravity.  They often use units of the 'G' force with 1 being what we feel on the surface of the earth due to gravity.  But, that's just a convenient unit of measurement and has nothing to do with the physics.


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also why someone was able to go around the earth in 180 days if we aren't a globe. She keeps making the argument that if we start at one point and travel in any cardinal direction we will return to the starting point. How is this possible on a flat earth? I know these are a lot of questions,but I am new to this and I figured someone could start with at least one. Thanks.

The idea of traveling in a circle around the globe can only happen on the globe.  It can be any circle, anywhere on the globe.  But on a flat earth, this will only work if you travel on a line of latitude (due east or due west).  Any other direction will cause you to eventually run into the "Antarctic ice wall".  In fact, this only works with a flat earth with the North Pole or South Pole at the center. 

There are many, many things wrong with the flat earth.  I had hoped to find a coherent description of the flat earth here.  But, I only find scattered bits and pieces and most of it makes no sense.  Also, most flat earth believers seem to focus on debunking the globe earth, rather than showing how a flat earth would function.  Of course, that doesn't work out too well, and only produces long, draw out arguments with no resolution or purpose.

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: Water rotation/circumnavigation/gravity
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2024, 07:09:35 AM »
This is Flat Earth Q&A. If you know the FET answer you may give it, but this is not a debate forum.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.