Water always finds level...or does it?

  • 29 Replies
  • 1270 Views
Water always finds level...or does it?
« on: September 08, 2022, 03:05:02 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

*

NotSoSkeptical

  • 8534
  • Flat like a droplet of water.
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2022, 08:37:41 AM »
The flatness is amazing.....

Rabinoz RIP

That would put you in the same category as pedophile perverts like John Davis, NSS, robots like Stash, Shifter, and victimized kids like Alexey.

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2022, 09:23:40 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

?

Username

  • Administrator
  • 17523
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2022, 09:28:57 AM »
Its ridiculous to use what you are trying to prove (the earth being round) as the basis of your argument. That would be circular logic.

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2022, 09:58:10 AM »
Its ridiculous to use what you are trying to prove (the earth being round) as the basis of your argument. That would be circular logic.

Then my intention with this post has been misunderstood. I'm not trying to prove that the earth is round. I'm trying to disprove the claim that "water appears flat, therefore the earth must be flat"

I want flat earthers to try to understand how water would act on a round planet
« Last Edit: September 08, 2022, 10:02:13 AM by Notthecurtains »

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2022, 09:59:14 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2022, 10:09:47 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2022, 10:22:58 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water


*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2022, 10:37:33 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2022, 11:23:30 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2022, 11:26:30 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2022, 11:32:01 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #12 on: September 08, 2022, 11:41:17 AM »

Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works.


We know from other threads, the only way a sunset is possible is because of a spherical earth.  Where the sun goes below the horizon to cast a shadow of the earth’s curvature we call nightfall.

Things also not explained by flat earth.

Low tide.

High tide.

Tidal bores.

Quote


 tidal bore,[1] often simply given as bore in context, is a tidal phenomenon in which the leading edge of the incoming tide forms a wave (or waves) of water that travels up a river or narrow bay, reversing the direction of the river or bay's current. It is a strong tide that pushes up the river, against the current.




https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_bore

And add the fact the force exerted by gravity is demonstrated by a hanging spring scale. When a load on the spring causes the spring to lengthen in accordance with Hooke’s law.

Quote

In physics, Hooke's law is an empirical law which states that the force (F) needed to extend or compress a spring by some distance (x) scales linearly with respect to that distance—that is, Fs = kx, where k is a constant factor characteristic of the spring (i.e., its stiffness), and x is small compared to the total possible deformation of the spring.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooke%27s_law

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2022, 11:42:07 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

A flat earth can still be whizzing throughout the cosmos. To fall off this merry-go-round you would still have to counteract the speed in which it is traveling first. As that is impossible, it is moot

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2022, 11:48:05 AM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

A flat earth can still be whizzing throughout the cosmos. To fall off this merry-go-round you would still have to counteract the speed in which it is traveling first. As that is impossible, it is moot

How fast is it traveling? Which direction is it traveling in relative to "down"? Why is that impossible?

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2022, 12:07:05 PM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

A flat earth can still be whizzing throughout the cosmos. To fall off this merry-go-round you would still have to counteract the speed in which it is traveling first. As that is impossible, it is moot

How fast is it traveling? Which direction is it traveling in relative to "down"? Why is that impossible?

I'm not the answer man. Maybe we are moving at 30km/s or maybe we are moving at 9.8m/s/s. Who knows


Direction of down is opposite to the direction of travel. If Earth and Mars were on a collision course, Mars' down would be Earth's up. 2 separate bodies in the empty void.

On a flat earth you cant have one person pointing UP to the sky and it being someone elses direction of DOWN while they also pointing UP at the sky.


Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2022, 12:15:55 PM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

A flat earth can still be whizzing throughout the cosmos. To fall off this merry-go-round you would still have to counteract the speed in which it is traveling first. As that is impossible, it is moot

How fast is it traveling? Which direction is it traveling in relative to "down"? Why is that impossible?

I'm not the answer man. Maybe we are moving at 30km/s or maybe we are moving at 9.8m/s/s. Who knows


Direction of down is opposite to the direction of travel. If Earth and Mars were on a collision course, Mars' down would be Earth's up. 2 separate bodies in the empty void.

On a flat earth you cant have one person pointing UP to the sky and it being someone elses direction of DOWN while they also pointing UP at the sky.

But earlier you said " down" was absolute. Remember, "space has direction". Now its relative to direction of travel of a specified object. If you don't know how fast we're traveling then you can't say with certainty that acting against that motion is impossible. You're reinforcing the notion that flat earthers just make up whatever explanation is convenient at the time.

In a similar example: on a flat earth you can't have two people on opposite sides of the planet point south and both see the same stars, because they're actually looking in opposite directions. People can look south in opposite places at the same time and both see the same stars.

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2022, 12:23:05 PM »
Flat earthers always point to lakes and oceans and say "water always finds level" as evidence that the earth is flat.

For the sake of argument, imagine a massive planet sized ball. For simplicity let's say its a perfect sphere with no hills or valleys or any landmasses at all.

Now imagine that the entire surface is covered by water 1m deep.

According to flat earther's rules of how water works, how would that 1m deep layer of water then move in order to find level?

This ball and the water is completely separate from earth, so not affected by anything on earth at all.

Looking for serious flat earthed responses

Hang on, the premise of your question is stupid. 'Ball shaped' planets? Flat Earth is flat. IF There was a ball shaped planet out there with water, the water would fall off into the void of space. Your probably assuming that a theory called gravity would hold the water to the planet but that's not how space works. There is an up and a down. A ball shaped planet with liquid all over it would not be able to contain it. It would just fall off leaving a rocky planet

Earth is flat. It's special. Curated. I grant you planets could be ball shaped. Just huge rocks. But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

What would cause the water to fall off the planet?

Why would it fall in one specific direction rather than any other possible direction?

Because space has direction. And whatever gravity turns out to be once we understand it, we know what is up, goes down at the least. Water will follow the down direction. Liquid is not tightly bound to the surface of a planet. It is separate. A flat Earth like ours has land masses and an Antarctic ice wall to keep it in

The lack of liquid on every ball shaped rock we have studied out in the universe confirms liquid water can not hold onto a ball shape

If space has direction, can you explain which direction that is in? Without using relative directions

Why does it have a direction at all?

We do have candidates for extrasolar liquid water. With JWST we're only going to find more candidates and with higher certainty

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extrasolar_candidates_for_liquid_water

Well we are on a flat plane are we not? Point to the sky. That's up. Point to the ground. That's down

So its up and down relative to the surface of the earth then. What if you're on a different planet? Or if you're just floating in space with no reference points?

Well other planets that are ball shaped you could only be standing on a part that has your head upwards and feet downwards.

Why do all your arguments hinge on 'what ifs'? Cant you use reality to make your point?

What ifs make you think about other possibilities that you might not have considered. They're important, unless you want to only think about things that you already feel that you're right about and you don't want to question your preexisting beliefs about how things work.

If there is an absolute direction of space, then if I fell off the planet would I fall forever? What causes this "down"? Is the earth falling down right now? Is there a bottom? If so, what happens if we reach it?

A flat earth can still be whizzing throughout the cosmos. To fall off this merry-go-round you would still have to counteract the speed in which it is traveling first. As that is impossible, it is moot

How fast is it traveling? Which direction is it traveling in relative to "down"? Why is that impossible?

I'm not the answer man. Maybe we are moving at 30km/s or maybe we are moving at 9.8m/s/s. Who knows


Direction of down is opposite to the direction of travel. If Earth and Mars were on a collision course, Mars' down would be Earth's up. 2 separate bodies in the empty void.

On a flat earth you cant have one person pointing UP to the sky and it being someone elses direction of DOWN while they also pointing UP at the sky.

But earlier you said " down" was absolute. Remember, "space has direction". Now its relative to direction of travel of a specified object. If you don't know how fast we're traveling then you can't say with certainty that acting against that motion is impossible. You're reinforcing the notion that flat earthers just make up whatever explanation is convenient at the time.

In a similar example: on a flat earth you can't have two people on opposite sides of the planet point south and both see the same stars, because they're actually looking in opposite directions. People can look south in opposite places at the same time and both see the same stars.

If everything is moving, space has relative direction. If everything is stationary, space has an absolute direction. So what?

As for the stars being different, I am reminded by something Worf said on Star Trek TNG Season 7; Episode 13 'Homeward', when moving refugees to another world but tricking them in the meantime through the holodeck

"Where we are going will be very far away. Even the stars will be different"

America and Australia are pretty far away, hence our different looking stars

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #18 on: September 08, 2022, 12:57:12 PM »
Why does space have a direction if everything is stationary? If the earth stopped moving and stopped spinning we would still know where north, south, up and down is.

Also that example doesn't work, did you actually think about it or just spout a quote?

Australia and Uruguay and south Africa are all far away from each other, they see the same stars.

Someone in Egypt and someone in Florida would also see the same stars. Just being far away from a different place on earth doesn't mean you'll see different stars

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #19 on: September 08, 2022, 01:09:32 PM »
Why does space have a direction if everything is stationary? If the earth stopped moving and stopped spinning we would still know where north, south, up and down is.

Also that example doesn't work, did you actually think about it or just spout a quote?

Australia and Uruguay and south Africa are all far away from each other, they see the same stars.

Someone in Egypt and someone in Florida would also see the same stars. Just being far away from a different place on earth doesn't mean you'll see different stars

Again. I am not answer man and I wont pretend I know it all. If Earth was moving and then stopped, who knows? Or maybe it's not the Earth that's moving but the void around us.


As for the stars it depends on the directional plane you travel. East-West, can be same. North-South, different. There are different refractive indexes across sections of the 'dome'. And no I dont subscribe that the 'dome' is like a physical shield. It is just our atmosphere (the 'thin blue line'). If it's physical it is literally just atmospheric gases that have frozen around the outer edges (antarctic ice wall)


Look, I'm doing my best alright.  :P It's not easy doing a thought experiment on something seemingly illogical. You're the one that wanted flat earth answers.

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #20 on: September 08, 2022, 01:31:42 PM »
Why does space have a direction if everything is stationary? If the earth stopped moving and stopped spinning we would still know where north, south, up and down is.

Also that example doesn't work, did you actually think about it or just spout a quote?

Australia and Uruguay and south Africa are all far away from each other, they see the same stars.

Someone in Egypt and someone in Florida would also see the same stars. Just being far away from a different place on earth doesn't mean you'll see different stars

Again. I am not answer man and I wont pretend I know it all. If Earth was moving and then stopped, who knows? Or maybe it's not the Earth that's moving but the void around us.


As for the stars it depends on the directional plane you travel. East-West, can be same. North-South, different. There are different refractive indexes across sections of the 'dome'. And no I dont subscribe that the 'dome' is like a physical shield. It is just our atmosphere (the 'thin blue line'). If it's physical it is literally just atmospheric gases that have frozen around the outer edges (antarctic ice wall)


Look, I'm doing my best alright.  :P It's not easy doing a thought experiment on something seemingly illogical. You're the one that wanted flat earth answers.

Again.  Your ignoring it’s been proven in other threads sun set is a property of a spherical earth.  Not a flat earth.

And the more on topic high tide, tidal bores, and low tides.  That are predictable because of the known movements of the solar system, and basic understanding of gravity.

Which is backed by why a hanging spring scale works in accordance with Hooke’s law. 

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2022, 01:38:53 PM »
Why does space have a direction if everything is stationary? If the earth stopped moving and stopped spinning we would still know where north, south, up and down is.

Also that example doesn't work, did you actually think about it or just spout a quote?

Australia and Uruguay and south Africa are all far away from each other, they see the same stars.

Someone in Egypt and someone in Florida would also see the same stars. Just being far away from a different place on earth doesn't mean you'll see different stars

Again. I am not answer man and I wont pretend I know it all. If Earth was moving and then stopped, who knows? Or maybe it's not the Earth that's moving but the void around us.


As for the stars it depends on the directional plane you travel. East-West, can be same. North-South, different. There are different refractive indexes across sections of the 'dome'. And no I dont subscribe that the 'dome' is like a physical shield. It is just our atmosphere (the 'thin blue line'). If it's physical it is literally just atmospheric gases that have frozen around the outer edges (antarctic ice wall)


Look, I'm doing my best alright.  :P It's not easy doing a thought experiment on something seemingly illogical. You're the one that wanted flat earth answers.

Again.  Your ignoring it’s been proven in other threads sun set is a property of a spherical earth.  Not a flat earth.

And the more on topic high tide, tidal bores, and low tides.  That are predictable because of the known movements of the solar system, and basic understanding of gravity.

Which is backed by why a hanging spring scale works in accordance with Hooke’s law.

Not if the sky above / around us had different refractive indexes giving us the illusion of a spherical style sun set.

Tides can be explained by gentle movements inside the Earths crust. For example a vicious movement like a sudden earthquake can cause a tsunami. A pretty high tide!

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #22 on: September 08, 2022, 02:10:52 PM »
But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape

Saturn's moon Titan has seas and lakes of liquid methane and ethane: Lakes of Titan

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #23 on: September 08, 2022, 02:19:18 PM »

Not if the sky above / around us had different refractive indexes giving us the illusion of a spherical style sun set.


Based on what composition of the atmosphere.

Two. We are posting about why the sun is physically blocked from view.

Three.  It is impossible for the “ground” of a flat earth to block the sun at sunset to creat night.

Quote
Tides can be explained by gentle movements inside the Earths crust.

What such movements.  And why do tides correspond to the movements of the solar system inline with the measured gravitational forces exerted by the bodies of the solar system.

Quote
For example a vicious movement like a sudden earthquake can cause a tsunami.

Again.  Has nothing to do with why tides are predictable and are predictable based on movements of the solar system.


And has no explanation why tidal bores cause rivers to run backwards.

And you completely ignored hanging spring scales work in accordance with Hooke’s law and gravity.

*

Wolvaccine

  • EXTRA SPICY MODE
  • 25833
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #24 on: September 08, 2022, 02:30:44 PM »

Not if the sky above / around us had different refractive indexes giving us the illusion of a spherical style sun set.


Based on what composition of the atmosphere.

Two. We are posting about why the sun is physically blocked from view.

Three.  It is impossible for the “ground” of a flat earth to block the sun at sunset to creat night.

Quote
Tides can be explained by gentle movements inside the Earths crust.

What such movements.  And why do tides correspond to the movements of the solar system inline with the measured gravitational forces exerted by the bodies of the solar system.

Quote
For example a vicious movement like a sudden earthquake can cause a tsunami.

Again.  Has nothing to do with why tides are predictable and are predictable based on movements of the solar system.


And has no explanation why tidal bores cause rivers to run backwards.

And you completely ignored hanging spring scales work in accordance with Hooke’s law and gravity.

Spotlight sun and celestial gears.

Someone else can take over now. I'm out 8)

Quote from: sokarul
what website did you use to buy your wife? Did you choose Chinese over Russian because she can't open her eyes to see you?

What animal relates to your wife?

Know your place

Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #25 on: September 08, 2022, 02:51:37 PM »

Spotlight sun


Which has nothing to do with your first assertion of “ different refractive indexes ”

A sun that should still be detectable by telescope and proper filtering.  The other radiation given off by the sun.  Radar.  Or blocking stars in the night sky as it pasted in front of them while shaded


Quote
and celestial gears.

Which as nothing to do with why the sun is blocked by the earth at sunset.  High tides.  Low tides.  Tidal bores.  Nor Spring scales and Hooke’s law.

And has nothing to do with why nautical charts don’t show your delusional assertion of large underwater masses moving in time to the tides that would be a threat to shipping and submarines.



I'm not the answer man.


Evidently not a concept man either

*

JackBlack

  • 20276
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2022, 02:52:05 PM »
But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape
We have found them with gas surfaces.
And the evidence indicates that Mars used to have liquid water on  its surface, but its poor atmosphere resulted in it boiling away or freezing.

So I would say that a liquid surface would be possible.

Its ridiculous to use what you are trying to prove (the earth being round) as the basis of your argument. That would be circular logic.
No, what is circular is FEers using their fantasy of how the world should work to try and say the water would fall off a round Earth.
That is using a flat Earth as the basis of their argument to try and refute the RE.

*

Mikey T.

  • 3534
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2022, 05:07:13 PM »
But have you ever found a ball shaped planet out there with a liquid surface? Of the many thousands of planets our telescopes have looked at, none are confirmed to have liquid surfaces. On the balance of probabilities it would appear that you cant have a ball shaped planet with liquid. That alone is a slam dunk proof that Earth is not a ball shape
We have found them with gas surfaces.
And the evidence indicates that Mars used to have liquid water on  its surface, but its poor atmosphere resulted in it boiling away or freezing.

So I would say that a liquid surface would be possible.

Its ridiculous to use what you are trying to prove (the earth being round) as the basis of your argument. That would be circular logic.
No, what is circular is FEers using their fantasy of how the world should work to try and say the water would fall off a round Earth.
That is using a flat Earth as the basis of their argument to try and refute the RE.

There are liquid oceans of methane on Titan.  They didn't specify water had to be the liquid. 

?

Username

  • Administrator
  • 17523
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2022, 09:59:02 PM »
And yes, your lot always says why is everything round if the earth is flat. Everyone has to deal with shitty ideas at some point as tender or be ignorant. Get off your high horse.

*

Mikey T.

  • 3534
Re: Water always finds level...or does it?
« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2022, 05:12:57 AM »
And yes, your lot always says why is everything round if the earth is flat. Everyone has to deal with shitty ideas at some point as tender or be ignorant. Get off your high horse.
Just because we can provide evidence and you only provide sparky comments and strawman arguments, doesn't mean we are on a high horse.  Kinda means you are just mucking around in the mud.  But sure, tell yourself what you need to feel special.