Why is the Earth's crust cool?

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markjo

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #30 on: August 08, 2021, 04:43:42 PM »
No Icelandic experts or geologists can explain why the lava in the crust is so hot.
Your inability to understand has nothing to do with their ability to explain.  But if you're really interested, you way want to look into tectonic activity in Iceland.
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A friend of mine living in Iceland on top of the cool crust just beside the deep crack where hot lava is spilling out has no idea why the lava is so hot. He has asked around! Nobody knows!
Why should living in Iceland make one an expert on lava? ???  Try asking a volcanologist.  You know, an expert on volcanoes and lava.

By the way, lava is hot because if it were cold, then it would just be be rock.
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Bullwinkle

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #31 on: August 08, 2021, 08:42:00 PM »

 part of  the plate titanic system,

Haha, I know what you meant.   ;D

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Heiwa

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #32 on: August 09, 2021, 07:43:27 AM »
Some people believe that radioactive decay takes place inside the Earth and heats up the granite core, so it melts and becomes liquid. So the whole rotating Earth core is hot and liquid lava flowing up and down in the core below us. The heat escapes away from the core and arrives at the top crust that is cooled by seawater covering >70% of planet Earth. And then there are cracks in the crust and some lava spills out, like on Iceland and Japan and Hawaii surrounded by sea water. Radioactive decay is known - some atoms just split and split releasing heat and becomes finally lead, wismut or iron or whatever. Of course radioactive decay has not been seen on planet Mars because there is no water on top of any crust there. Mars is freezing cold at ground. But there are plenty experts explaining why Mars is different from Earth, e.g. no radioactive decay on Mars. Then there are people suggesting God created Earth in seven days, etc, etc, etc. ROTFL.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2021, 07:46:10 AM by Heiwa »

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sokarul

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2021, 05:40:29 PM »
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

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markjo

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2021, 06:42:32 PM »
Some people believe that radioactive decay takes place inside the Earth and heats up the granite core...
I wouldn't listen to those people because they don't seem to know that the earth has a liquid iron and nickle outer core and a solid iron-nickle alloy inner core.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2021, 07:52:45 PM »
Some people believe that radioactive decay takes place inside the Earth and heats up the granite core...
I wouldn't listen to those people because they don't seem to know that the earth has a liquid iron and nickle outer core and a solid iron-nickle alloy inner core.
Other planets have other cores and crusts, e.g. Uranus and Neptune that are called ice giants because they are smaller and compositionally different from Jupiter and Saturn, the gas giants.
Jupiter and Saturn are composed of mostly hydrogen and helium, with large mantles of metallic hydrogen (which acts like a metal, due to the pressure and temperature within these planets) and only small cores of rock and ice. This is why they are called gas giants: They are mostly gaseous, with very little rock and ice.
Uranus and Neptune are composed of some hydrogen and helium, but they also contain heavier elements such as oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Beneath their relatively thin outer shells of hydrogen and helium, these planetsí mantles are largely made of compressed, slushy water and ammonia. The ice giantsí rocky, icy cores are also proportionally larger than the amount of gas they contain, unlike the gas giants. This is why Uranus and Neptune are called ice giants.
Etc, etc, etc.

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markjo

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2021, 08:19:19 PM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #37 on: August 09, 2021, 11:07:36 PM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Question is about the cool Earth's crust. It is cool as it is cooled by sea water on top of the crust. The heat then escapes into the atmosphere and from there into the Universe! Another question is what heats up the crust? It seems the crust is heated from below and radioactive decay of the core producing heat is a possibility. But it has not been noted on the Moon or cold planet Mars (or hot planet Venus or any other planets), so maybe I am wrong. Or maybe magnetic field forces rotate the Earth's core so it heats up? But it has not been observed anywhere else in the Universe either. Maybe the Earth is the center of the Universe and it's flat crust is just heated by itself? By MAGIC!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2021, 11:13:42 PM by Heiwa »

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #38 on: August 10, 2021, 06:31:52 AM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Question is about the cool Earth's crust. It is cool as it is cooled by sea water on top of the crust. The heat then escapes into the atmosphere and from there into the Universe! Another question is what heats up the crust? It seems the crust is heated from below and radioactive decay of the core producing heat is a possibility. But it has not been noted on the Moon or cold planet Mars (or hot planet Venus or any other planets), so maybe I am wrong. Or maybe magnetic field forces rotate the Earth's core so it heats up? But it has not been observed anywhere else in the Universe either. Maybe the Earth is the center of the Universe and it's flat crust is just heated by itself? By MAGIC!

Solar Radiation.
Rabinoz RIP

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Heiwa

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #39 on: August 10, 2021, 07:55:18 AM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Question is about the cool Earth's crust. It is cool as it is cooled by sea water on top of the crust. The heat then escapes into the atmosphere and from there into the Universe! Another question is what heats up the crust? It seems the crust is heated from below and radioactive decay of the core producing heat is a possibility. But it has not been noted on the Moon or cold planet Mars (or hot planet Venus or any other planets), so maybe I am wrong. Or maybe magnetic field forces rotate the Earth's core so it heats up? But it has not been observed anywhere else in the Universe either. Maybe the Earth is the center of the Universe and it's flat crust is just heated by itself? By MAGIC!

Solar Radiation.
No, the Sun only heats up planet Earth during day time and the polar sections are mostly in the shade. The crust is heated from below one way or other. There are volcanoes down at Antartic below 1000's of meter of ice.

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #40 on: August 10, 2021, 08:33:08 AM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Question is about the cool Earth's crust. It is cool as it is cooled by sea water on top of the crust. The heat then escapes into the atmosphere and from there into the Universe! Another question is what heats up the crust? It seems the crust is heated from below and radioactive decay of the core producing heat is a possibility. But it has not been noted on the Moon or cold planet Mars (or hot planet Venus or any other planets), so maybe I am wrong. Or maybe magnetic field forces rotate the Earth's core so it heats up? But it has not been observed anywhere else in the Universe either. Maybe the Earth is the center of the Universe and it's flat crust is just heated by itself? By MAGIC!

Solar Radiation.
No, the Sun only heats up planet Earth during day time and the polar sections are mostly in the shade. The crust is heated from below one way or other. There are volcanoes down at Antartic below 1000's of meter of ice.

If the crust was heated from below, being in the shade wouldn't matter.
Rabinoz RIP

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Heiwa

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Re: Why is the Earth's crust cool?
« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2021, 10:22:28 AM »
Other planets...
Are irrelevant and off topic.
Question is about the cool Earth's crust. It is cool as it is cooled by sea water on top of the crust. The heat then escapes into the atmosphere and from there into the Universe! Another question is what heats up the crust? It seems the crust is heated from below and radioactive decay of the core producing heat is a possibility. But it has not been noted on the Moon or cold planet Mars (or hot planet Venus or any other planets), so maybe I am wrong. Or maybe magnetic field forces rotate the Earth's core so it heats up? But it has not been observed anywhere else in the Universe either. Maybe the Earth is the center of the Universe and it's flat crust is just heated by itself? By MAGIC!

Solar Radiation.
No, the Sun only heats up planet Earth during day time and the polar sections are mostly in the shade. The crust is heated from below one way or other. There are volcanoes down at Antarctic below 1000's of meter of ice.

If the crust was heated from below, being in the shade wouldn't matter.
Correct. Sun bathing at night doesn't work. Better a sandy beach or a snowy mountain alp top for it at noon.