How did Round Earth scientists manage to predict an annular eclipse?

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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Tomorrow, there is a solar eclipse. Not just an eclipse, but an annular eclipse! In Round Earth terminology, an annular eclipse is when the moon passes in front of the Sun but does not completely block it, leaving a 'ring of fire' where the sun and moon are.

Now, by what method is an annular eclipse predictable years in advance by Flat Earth scientists?
Nullius in Verba

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JJA

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Re: How did Round Earth scientists manage to predict an annular eclipse?
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2021, 04:08:46 AM »
I can take a guess from previous responses.

Some people will tell your it's all done with epicycles, then fail to provide any math or examples of how it can actually predict the effects of the eclipse down to street level accuracy. And three body something.

Another common response is that some round earth equations may work for predicting things like eclipses, they have nothing to do with the shape of the earth, which is is still flat somehow.

I'd love to see a flat earth response with some math but we all know the real reason that can't happen. To produce a map showing the path of the eclipse, on a flat earth, you need a working flat earth map to draw it on, which doesn't exist. 

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Gumwars

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Re: How did Round Earth scientists manage to predict an annular eclipse?
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2021, 01:31:52 PM »
Ptolemaic astronomy explains it fairly well, if being needlessly complex explains anything well:

https://www.princeton.edu/~hos/mike/texts/ptolemy/ptolemy.html
I reject your reality and substitute my own. -- Every FE'er

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JJA

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Re: How did Round Earth scientists manage to predict an annular eclipse?
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2021, 01:58:58 PM »
Ptolemaic astronomy explains it fairly well, if being needlessly complex explains anything well:

https://www.princeton.edu/~hos/mike/texts/ptolemy/ptolemy.html

While they could predict lunar eclipses due to how big the Earth's shadow is which gives a ton of wiggle room, they were unable to predict annular eclipses as that requires an understanding of the actual motion of the Sun Earth and Moon system.

Even the best predictions could only guess within a month or more of when a solar eclipse might happen, and not at all where.

Re: How did Round Earth scientists manage to predict an annular eclipse?
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2021, 02:42:11 PM »
Ptolemaic astronomy explains it fairly well, if being needlessly complex explains anything well:

https://www.princeton.edu/~hos/mike/texts/ptolemy/ptolemy.html
That still utilises a RE and I would say has more in common with the modern RE model than the modern FE models.
It has a celestial sphere (lots actually), all moving around a round Earth, with the various celestial objects at different (and varying) distances to Earth).
That is in stark contrast to a FE, with the stars and sun and moon as a disk or dome above it, with all the celestial objects on the same dome.