How the frick do sunsets work on Flat Earth?

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FlatEarthisStupid

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How the frick do sunsets work on Flat Earth?
« on: February 13, 2021, 06:25:04 PM »
Sunsets happen. The sun goes below the horizon. On a Flat Earth model, the Sun will recede further away and get smaller in the sky until it disappears. But it doesn't. Why? I know it's not refraction from water droplets in the air or the air itself. The sunset looks the same regardless of the weather condition.

Re: How the frick do sunsets work on Flat Earth?
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2021, 04:28:13 PM »
I recommend giving the wiki here (and on the sister site) a quick read through to get a sense of the various answers to your question.

The answer, in my view, is that "setting" is an optical illusion.

Whether it is a light in the sky, a boat at sea, or a telephone pole / skyscraper; as the object recedes from the observer a few predictable things happen (appear to happen) chiefly for 2 generally understood reasons.

One thing is perspective.  The object appears to get smaller and will ultimately disappear when it is beyond your eye's angular resolution limit.

The other chief effect involved is caused by the air itself and the other matter that is in it (particulate/dust, water vapor etc.)

The air on earth (all things material, actually) has a tendency to settle in layers by density.  The densest air tends to be the air closest to the ground, and it wanes in density from there (increasing in elevation/altitude).

When light travels through those varying layers it is affected by it - causing it to follow a, generally, convex curve towards the ground.  This is what is most responsible for the "bottom disappearing first" phenomenon.  The light isn't blocked by earth/water - it is diverted by the density gradient in our air.

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Stash

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Re: How the frick do sunsets work on Flat Earth?
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2021, 05:08:13 PM »
I recommend giving the wiki here (and on the sister site) a quick read through to get a sense of the various answers to your question.

The answer, in my view, is that "setting" is an optical illusion.

Whether it is a light in the sky, a boat at sea, or a telephone pole / skyscraper; as the object recedes from the observer a few predictable things happen (appear to happen) chiefly for 2 generally understood reasons.

One thing is perspective.  The object appears to get smaller and will ultimately disappear when it is beyond your eye's angular resolution limit.

The other chief effect involved is caused by the air itself and the other matter that is in it (particulate/dust, water vapor etc.)

The air on earth (all things material, actually) has a tendency to settle in layers by density.  The densest air tends to be the air closest to the ground, and it wanes in density from there (increasing in elevation/altitude).

When light travels through those varying layers it is affected by it - causing it to follow a, generally, convex curve towards the ground.  This is what is most responsible for the "bottom disappearing first" phenomenon.  The light isn't blocked by earth/water - it is diverted by the density gradient in our air.

Using one of the FE claims about Sun & Moon altitude and size, here's a simulation showing how a 3000 mile high, 30 mile wide Moon (Same for the sun) would change size as it “sets”. “Perspective” would shrink the Moon or Sun as it recedes instead of setting below the horizon. It doesn’t shrink:



I’m not seeing a diversion by the density gradient in our air:



Nor here:



Nor here:

We've never really been a single entity.  We're more like a collection of rabid honey badgers stuffed into a 3 piece suit.  It occasionally bears the semblance of a man

Re: How the frick do sunsets work on Flat Earth?
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2021, 01:38:59 PM »
One thing is perspective.  The object appears to get smaller and will ultimately disappear when it is beyond your eye's angular resolution limit.
Which doesn't happen for the sun. In fact the fact the sun remains roughly the same size (when viewed through a filter that removes glare) shows that perspective is not responsible for the sun setting at all.
Another factor showing it isn't perspective is the fact that its angular speed in the equatorial plane remains ~constant. If it was perspective it would appear to slow down as it got further away.

If perspective was causing the sun to vanish, it would appear to shrink to a dot while still high in the sky.


The air on earth (all things material, actually) has a tendency to settle in layers by density.  The densest air tends to be the air closest to the ground, and it wanes in density from there (increasing in elevation/altitude).
When light travels through those varying layers it is affected by it - causing it to follow a, generally, convex curve towards the ground.
Which would make the sun appear higher and make it harder for it to set.
This does not cause the bottom of the object to disappear from the bottom up.
What you need for that is an inverted gradient which causes light to bend upwards, away from the ground.

Regardless, the effect of refraction cannot account for the massive change in angle required for the commonly promoted 5000 km high sun for the FE.