What are meteors?

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MidnightWolf9908

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What are meteors?
« on: April 07, 2021, 08:24:16 PM »
If meteors aren't tiny rocks burning up in Earth's atmosphere from space, because space apparently isn't real, then what are they really?
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sceptimatic

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2021, 01:11:58 AM »
What they are is open to question.

My theory is:

Hydrogen/helium ice build up on the dome from gases that turned into superfluids then icicles that get too dense to hold at the top of the atmospheric stack/dome.
They break off and are caught in an atmospheric stream where they may friction burn as they hit more and more dense atmosphere higher up.


In my opinion, of course.

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JJA

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2021, 07:04:48 AM »
What they are is open to question.

My theory is:

Hydrogen/helium ice build up on the dome from gases that turned into superfluids then icicles that get too dense to hold at the top of the atmospheric stack/dome.
They break off and are caught in an atmospheric stream where they may friction burn as they hit more and more dense atmosphere higher up.


In my opinion, of course.

A few problems.

Anything in freefall in an atmosphere will hit terminal velocity and prevent it from moving fast enough to burn up.  If you drop an object from the top of the dome it simply won't be able to gain enough speed to burn up.  Meteors burn up do to their massive orbital velocity, hitting the atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles an hour.

We have countless meteor samples and they are not ice, they are rock and metal. We even have samples that hit in cities so people witnessed them. So the question of where this rock and metal is coming from remains.

Objects entering the atmosphere do not burn up due to friction, they burn up doe to heat transfer from the large amount of atmosphere they compress in front of themselves, which retains all the heat but in a much smaller space. It's a similar result to friction but it's important to get the mechanics right.

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MidnightWolf9908

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2021, 07:16:52 AM »
What they are is open to question.

My theory is:

Hydrogen/helium ice build up on the dome from gases that turned into superfluids then icicles that get too dense to hold at the top of the atmospheric stack/dome.
They break off and are caught in an atmospheric stream where they may friction burn as they hit more and more dense atmosphere higher up.


In my opinion, of course.

While ice burning up in the atmosphere sounds reasonable, I have two comments regarding it:
In 2013, a meteor exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia. Since ice would've melted or sublimated long before getting to an altitude into which pressure from the outside air would've built up in cracks and pores enough for the meteor to explode, the explanation for why it could've exploded is that it was made of rock. I know that hydrogen is an explosive substance, but Earth's atmosphere is made up of around 0.000055% hydrogen (at Wikipedia's estimates). I don't think there is enough hydrogen in the Earth's atmosphere to produce an explosion of this magnitude. Yet again, this is just my speculation.
My second comment regards to the fact that you said that the meteors could be "gases that turned into superfluids then icicles". Superfluids are liquids with no viscosity, meaning they are able to flow with absolutely zero difficulty. Helium becomes this state of matter instead of turning solid. Superfluids are unable to become solids, because elements that solidify cannot become a superfluid, and vice versa.
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Ski

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2021, 07:32:32 AM »
Quote from: wolf
then what are they really?
Tiny rocks burning up in Earth's atmoplane from "space", mostly.


Quote
Since ice would've melted or sublimated long before getting to an altitude into which pressure from the outside air would've built up in cracks and pores enough for the meteor to explode, ...
That's rather presumptuous.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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MidnightWolf9908

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2021, 07:45:31 AM »
Tiny rocks burning up in Earth's atmoplane from "space", mostly.

If it ain't from space, then where the heck is it from?
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MidnightWolf9908

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2021, 07:46:22 AM »
Quote
Since ice would've melted or sublimated long before getting to an altitude into which pressure from the outside air would've built up in cracks and pores enough for the meteor to explode, ...
That's rather presumptuous.

Setting a piece of ice on fire does cause it to melt, does it not?
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Ski

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2021, 07:54:10 AM »
How long does a meteor typically last? The one in your example, for instance.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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sceptimatic

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2021, 08:24:14 AM »
What they are is open to question.

My theory is:

Hydrogen/helium ice build up on the dome from gases that turned into superfluids then icicles that get too dense to hold at the top of the atmospheric stack/dome.
They break off and are caught in an atmospheric stream where they may friction burn as they hit more and more dense atmosphere higher up.


In my opinion, of course.

A few problems.

Anything in freefall in an atmosphere will hit terminal velocity and prevent it from moving fast enough to burn up.  If you drop an object from the top of the dome it simply won't be able to gain enough speed to burn up.
Up near the dome you would have extreme expansion, not extreme pressure.
Any hydrogen/helium build up on the dome would fall and be taken by the high atmospheric stream of gases which would be extremely slow moving...but, enough for a friction burn which can vary in severity depending on the size and the distance it manages to fall before friction burn out.

Remember I'm not looking at it through the eyes of a globalist.


Quote from: JJA
  Meteors burn up do to their massive orbital velocity, hitting the atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles an hour.
So you've been led to believe.


Quote from: JJA
We have countless meteor samples and they are not ice, they are rock and metal. We even have samples that hit in cities so people witnessed them. So the question of where this rock and metal is coming from remains.
Any metals or rocks or suchlike ...if it is the case, would likely come directly from the central energy point which projects the light we call, the sun.

Again, my theory for my Earth.



Quote from: JJA
Objects entering the atmosphere do not burn up due to friction, they burn up doe to heat transfer from the large amount of atmosphere they compress in front of themselves, which retains all the heat but in a much smaller space.
It's still friction no matter how it's dressed up.
The only difference with friction is in the pressure and frequency and what it creates in terms of visual or feel or senses.

Quote from: JJA
It's a similar result to friction but it's important to get the mechanics right.
It's energy and friction/vibration which creates pressure to show light and/or sound depending on frequency of it.

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sceptimatic

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Re: What are meteors?
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2021, 08:44:37 AM »
What they are is open to question.

My theory is:

Hydrogen/helium ice build up on the dome from gases that turned into superfluids then icicles that get too dense to hold at the top of the atmospheric stack/dome.
They break off and are caught in an atmospheric stream where they may friction burn as they hit more and more dense atmosphere higher up.


In my opinion, of course.

While ice burning up in the atmosphere sounds reasonable, I have two comments regarding it:
In 2013, a meteor exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia. Since ice would've melted or sublimated long before getting to an altitude into which pressure from the outside air would've built up in cracks and pores enough for the meteor to explode, the explanation for why it could've exploded is that it was made of rock.
This may be the case but it depends on the mindset.
You believe in space and things coming into Earth's atmosphere.
I believe we're a cell in itself, meaning space does not exist to our view or abilities to exit the cell.
Everything is contained meaning whatever falls is whatever was produced by this cell, alone.


Quote from: MidnightWolf9908
I know that hydrogen is an explosive substance, but Earth's atmosphere is made up of around 0.000055% hydrogen (at Wikipedia's estimates). I don't think there is enough hydrogen in the Earth's atmosphere to produce an explosion of this magnitude. Yet again, this is just my speculation.
The above atmosphere would be abundant with hydrogen/helium, etc. In my opinion.

The difference is, down here we can break down gases/liquids and use them in this dense atmosphere we live under at sea level, etc.
Any substance broken down will naturally be acted upon by the denser atmosphere we live under.
However, in their rightful place those gases will be very little in terms of volatile, unless allowed to build and fall.

It's like light versions of the icicles that fall from roof's. They build and build and build depending on how little energy can reach them to friction melt them.

Down here icicles melt. Up there they would glow as they hit denser atmosphere.

Quote from: MidnightWolf9908
My second comment regards to the fact that you said that the meteors could be "gases that turned into superfluids then icicles". Superfluids are liquids with no viscosity, meaning they are able to flow with absolutely zero difficulty.
You have rising gases then those gases enter their own stack where they are not under any real pressure or friction.
This causes them to freeze...but, in that mix of gas to freeze, you get a superfluid. A stream. A moving stream, dependent on the movement of the reflected energy of the sun/moon reflections coming from within.


With regularity you'll get many hydrogen etc, icicle break off's from the dome that will fall slowly and friction melt back into gas, high up to be no issue.

Then you'll get a larger icicle build which maybe be a massive mix of hydrogen/helium, etc that falls and friction melts much slower as it moves and falls.
The more dense atmosphere it hits the bigger the glow. The bigger the glow the more pressure created by massive expansion into the dense atmosphere, which inevitably creates a smash back or a massive clap  as that dense atmosphere is displaced by the icicle.



Quote from: MidnightWolf9908
Helium becomes this state of matter instead of turning solid. Superfluids are unable to become solids, because elements that solidify cannot become a superfluid, and vice versa.
Hard to do down here but a regularity up at the dome.

Obviously in my opinion and the fact that I obviously do not follow a global model with space.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2021, 08:48:48 AM by sceptimatic »