A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.

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TheAdvocate

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A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« on: May 12, 2020, 07:07:44 AM »
I am curious, after doing a bit of research, what makes things fall to the ground. Does gravity exist or is Acceleration the force that is keeping things from falling off the surface of the Earth?

I am a Globe earther but am curious on what you belive. I don't just want one answer, I'd like all of your oppinions.



3$+3=719.43

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John Davis

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2020, 09:48:56 PM »
Science is a measure of what makes things fall. Gravity is a fake force and things follow their natural path.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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John Davis

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2020, 09:49:24 PM »
Sorry not fall - fail. Ahem.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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jmf

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2020, 08:14:32 AM »
First post as a very long-time lurker on this particular site.

There are multiple competing views in Flat Earth about what causes the downward force "gravity" acting on everything on earth.

"Universal Acceleration" (UA) is the one you mentioned. It's the idea that the flat earth, in its own reference frame, accelerates upward at 9.8m/s^2, which gives us, in our reference frame, the appearance that we are accelerating down at that rate. Like how when you hit the gas in a car, even though the car is accelerating forward, you feel a slight backward acceleration.

There's also Infinite Plane (IP), or really just any stationary plane idea. My impression is that this is the dominant belief among FE. In this the earth is stationary, and gravity really is a downward force, contrast to a perceived/relative force like in UA. Some will explain this with things like magnetism or pressure, but its usually just explained that gravity really is a downward force from mass. Personally, I also favor IP, as gravity stemming from mass is one of the only and simplest ways you can explain things like the Cavendish experiment, among other things.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2020, 08:16:08 AM by jmf »

Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2020, 09:21:33 PM »
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Gravity is a fake force and things follow their natural path.

Things accelerate towards the ground very predictably at about 9.8m/s2. What causes that acceleration?

Quote
here's also Infinite Plane (IP), or really just any stationary plane idea. My impression is that this is the dominant belief among FE. In this the earth is stationary, and gravity really is a downward force, contrast to a perceived/relative force like in UA. Some will explain this with things like magnetism or pressure, but its usually just explained that gravity really is a downward force from mass.

This would mean gravity behaves differently depending on where you are on the earth. Gravity acts towards the center of mass of an object, so near the outside of the disk gravity would be weaker and not straight down, at the center it would be strongest and straight down.

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boydster

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2020, 12:51:39 PM »
Quote
here's also Infinite Plane (IP), or really just any stationary plane idea. My impression is that this is the dominant belief among FE. In this the earth is stationary, and gravity really is a downward force, contrast to a perceived/relative force like in UA. Some will explain this with things like magnetism or pressure, but its usually just explained that gravity really is a downward force from mass.

This would mean gravity behaves differently depending on where you are on the earth. Gravity acts towards the center of mass of an object, so near the outside of the disk gravity would be weaker and not straight down, at the center it would be strongest and straight down.
An infinite plane doesn't have a center of mass (if it had a center, it wouldn't be infinite). Regardless, if you'd like to discuss or debate this rather than just simply asking a question and waiting for an answer, you'd be better served opening a thread in FE General or FE Debate. The Q&A section is very simply for asking FE questions and getting FE answers.

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sandokhan

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2020, 12:06:55 AM »
Here is the real law of gravity:

https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=30499.msg2265207#msg2265207

Wtotal =  [-mg x g-forcematter] + [g x g-forceantimatter]

g = -ρ x V = negative density mass of antimatter

mg = ρ x V = mass density of matter


For normal matter, W = -mg x g-forcematter. The weight-force and g-force (vector acceleration) have opposite signs of direction.

For antimatter W = g x g-forceantimatter.


The matter-antimatter law of gravity/antigravity has been verified experimentally using the exact formula for g-forceantimatter for the Biefeld-Brown effect:




https://arxiv.org/pdf/gr-qc/0507082.pdf

Weyl electrovacuum solutions and gauge invariance
Dr. B.V. Ivanov

Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2020, 11:47:52 AM »
The Universal Acceleration the flat earth folk talk about here seems to me to be a 2 dimensional force that only
explains the very basic "up/down" motion here on the surface of the earth. It falls apart when you consider a 3 dimensional
universe. You cannot hope to explain earth's acceleration in just one direction, when everything in the solar system is moving in all directions.
Gravity (attraction between masses , and not just 2 masses, by the way), conversely, is beautifully explained by gravitational theory,
supplemented by Einstein's added relativity equations, which become necessary at near-light speed velocities, and really big masses.
I saw the quote : "science is a measure of why things fail" near the top. Wow.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2020, 11:51:57 AM by dbamember »

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Crouton

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2020, 11:53:32 AM »
Hello dbamember.

You're a little new here so it's not a big deal but I should tell you that q&a is not the place to debate ideas.  You're welcome to start a conversation on the subject in flat earth general or the debate subforum.

thanks
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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2020, 05:26:21 PM »
I'm not sure I understand. I was simply answering the guy's question. Not even trying
to start a debate. Are you referring to my last sentence, or the whole post? My apologies,
but I'm a little confused.

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Space Cowgirl

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2020, 07:02:43 PM »
I'm not sure I understand. I was simply answering the guy's question. Not even trying
to start a debate. Are you referring to my last sentence, or the whole post? My apologies,
but I'm a little confused.

This is the Flat Earth Society. People ask questions in Q&A because they want answers from flat earth theory. Please read the rules of the forum.
I'm sorry. Am I to understand that when you have a boner you like to imagine punching the shit out of Tom Bishop? That's disgusting.

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Curvature

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2020, 02:28:48 AM »
What I would like to know is how flat earthers explain the fact that freefall acceleration is different depending on where you are. At the equator it is 9.780 m/s^2 whereas on the poles it is 9.832 m/s^2. On round earth, this makes perfect sense because the earth rotates around an axis through the poles which causes you to accelerate upward when you are on the equator. This of course decreases the downward acceleration. But on flat earth this makes no sense because on a flat disc the force of gravity would be exactly the same everywhere.

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sandokhan

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Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2020, 03:01:05 AM »
But on flat earth this makes no sense because on a flat disc the force of gravity would be exactly the same everywhere.

No.

The density of the ether drift varies by latitude, by altitude.


Re: A Question about Gravity and Acceleration.
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2020, 07:46:15 AM »
@theadvocate

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Does gravity exist or is Acceleration the force that is keeping things from falling off the surface of the Earth?

No, to both.

Mass and gravity are mathematical fiction with no reality.  They cannot be measured nor rigorously/adequately defined.

Weight, an intrinsic and inexorable property of all matter, is all there is - and can you believe the coincidence? When you multiply mass and gravity together, they return to the real and measured weight they started as!

Archimedes had all this worked out millennia ago, and it is sad to see us struggle so today...

Archimedes principle describes and provides/allows experimental proof of the cause of things falling, rising, or neither.  It's weight, an intrinsic and inexorable property of all matter!

The energy for the falling, comes from the lifting directly - and is always balanced in accord with the law of conservation.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 07:48:37 AM by jack44556677 »