Light clock doesn't work if moving?

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Light clock doesn't work if moving?
« on: November 19, 2020, 10:02:00 AM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the fifty percent speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 07:53:09 AM by E E K »

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JJA

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Re: Light clock doesn't work if moving?
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2020, 12:54:24 PM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?

I'm not sure what the question you are asking is here.

If you set up some mirrors so light bounces perfectly between them, then move one then yes, the light will miss the mirror. That you moved. Out of the path of the light.

Einstein doesn't have a 'standard' light clock. As in all scientific papers, he describes a specific setup for any argument or test he proposes. You would have to point out a specific paper and ask about that setup if you have questions.

Moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at angle?
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2020, 07:45:50 PM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?

I'm not sure what the question you are asking is here.

If you set up some mirrors so light bounces perfectly between them, then move one then yes, the light will miss the mirror. That you moved. Out of the path of the light.

Einstein doesn't have a 'standard' light clock. As in all scientific papers, he describes a specific setup for any argument or test he proposes. You would have to point out a specific paper and ask about that setup if you have questions.
so does the mathematical model of time dilation (considered as universal truth)  correct if time doesn't dilate in the aforementioned light clock?

BTW its an anti-time dilation light clock. dilation in the first cycle is balanced by the compression in the second half cycle.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2020, 11:13:03 AM by E E K »

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JJA

  • 4141
  • Math is math!
Re: Moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at angle?
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2020, 04:03:21 AM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?

I'm not sure what the question you are asking is here.

If you set up some mirrors so light bounces perfectly between them, then move one then yes, the light will miss the mirror. That you moved. Out of the path of the light.

Einstein doesn't have a 'standard' light clock. As in all scientific papers, he describes a specific setup for any argument or test he proposes. You would have to point out a specific paper and ask about that setup if you have questions.
so does the mathematical model of time dilation (considered as universal truth)  correct if time doesn't dilate in the aforementioned light clock?

BTW where to ask about the specific paper and the set up of the light clock?

There are many ways to design a light clock.  If you design one that doesn't work on purpose, what you have isn't a light clock but something else.

So you can't design a broken light clock and expect anything but it not working. It wouldn't make sense any other way.

Re: Moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at angle?
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2020, 05:46:04 AM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?

I'm not sure what the question you are asking is here.

If you set up some mirrors so light bounces perfectly between them, then move one then yes, the light will miss the mirror. That you moved. Out of the path of the light.

Einstein doesn't have a 'standard' light clock. As in all scientific papers, he describes a specific setup for any argument or test he proposes. You would have to point out a specific paper and ask about that setup if you have questions.
so does the mathematical model of time dilation (considered as universal truth)  correct if time doesn't dilate in the aforementioned light clock?

BTW where to ask about the specific paper and the set up of the light clock?

There are many ways to design a light clock.  If you design one that doesn't work on purpose, what you have isn't a light clock but something else.

So you can't design a broken light clock and expect anything but it not working. It wouldn't make sense any other way.
Actually the same (out of path) is true for the light clock used by Einstien as well but we didn't realize. A light clock is perfectly fine if it works accurately at rest for all stationary observers. A broken light doesn't work not only at rest but also in moving.

If a moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at an angle then it means the two postulates of Einstein on which the modern relativity is based are also wrong.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 06:40:15 AM by E E K »

*

JJA

  • 4141
  • Math is math!
Re: Moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at angle?
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2020, 04:41:25 PM »
A light clock shown in the following figure consists of four mirrors A, B, C, and D. Distances AB=BC=CD=DA. Angle ABC = Angle BCD= Angle CDA = Angle DAB =90o or θ1 = θ 2 = 45o degrees. The observer in the clock at point A is Oc. There is another stationary observer Os on an asteroid. A pulse of a light clock takes 1 second to complete a path of ABCDA or ADCBA for all stationary observers. The clock of Os is synchronized with the light clock before its journey into space. Let the said clock starts moving at a very high speed in space relative to Os.

It is observed that a pulse misses its upper target if the aforementioned light clock moves at any speed. It means a pulse of light doesn’t even hit mirror B if fired at A in its desired direction towards mirror B due to the speed of the light clock in its forward direction.

Even if the firing angle of a pulse is adjusted with the speed of a moving clock, then it (a pulse) still misses the lower target/ mirror “C” in its round trip if the speed of the light clock is less than the speed of light.

A light clock can be designed in an infinite number of ways. So, is the light clock used by Einstein, which consists of two mirrors for the derivation of his famous equation of “Time Dilation” standard?

I'm not sure what the question you are asking is here.

If you set up some mirrors so light bounces perfectly between them, then move one then yes, the light will miss the mirror. That you moved. Out of the path of the light.

Einstein doesn't have a 'standard' light clock. As in all scientific papers, he describes a specific setup for any argument or test he proposes. You would have to point out a specific paper and ask about that setup if you have questions.
so does the mathematical model of time dilation (considered as universal truth)  correct if time doesn't dilate in the aforementioned light clock?

BTW where to ask about the specific paper and the set up of the light clock?

There are many ways to design a light clock.  If you design one that doesn't work on purpose, what you have isn't a light clock but something else.

So you can't design a broken light clock and expect anything but it not working. It wouldn't make sense any other way.
Actually the same (out of path) is true for the light clock used by Einstien as well but we didn't realize. A light clock is perfectly fine if it works accurately at rest for all stationary observers. A broken light doesn't work not only at rest but also in moving.

If a moving clock doesn’t work if one of its mirrors is at an angle then it means the two postulates of Einstein on which the modern relativity is based are also wrong.

It's only broken if you make it broken on purpose like you did.

Einstein's postulates are not wrong.

You are not making a light clock, you are making a bunch of mirrors move around. Not sure what to call what you created, but it's not a light clock.