Orbits. How do they work?

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #330 on: October 16, 2020, 11:38:21 PM »
I invest my savings in plenty companies.
Investing a company does not automatically make you an expert on that company.

Topic here is orbits and how they work. I have explained it several times. It is simple. Once in orbit you cannot stop or get out of it.
You must have a different definition of "explain" than the rest of the English speaking world.  Saying that you cannot get out of an orbit is not the same as explaining why you cannot get out of an orbit.

Orbiting the moon or sun is no different than orbiting the earth and the concept of changing orbit is really quite simple.  It's really just a matter of getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
Hm, any rocket/spacecraft taking off from Earth to enter space/Universe orbits Earth. And that's it! You cannot start orbiting anything else, e.g. by getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
You are going too fast and cannot adjust speed due to lack of fuel.

Why is there a lack of fuel? I thought you agreed that spacecrafts can carry fuel?
Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits. That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #331 on: October 16, 2020, 11:47:50 PM »
I invest my savings in plenty companies.
Investing a company does not automatically make you an expert on that company.

Topic here is orbits and how they work. I have explained it several times. It is simple. Once in orbit you cannot stop or get out of it.
You must have a different definition of "explain" than the rest of the English speaking world.  Saying that you cannot get out of an orbit is not the same as explaining why you cannot get out of an orbit.

Orbiting the moon or sun is no different than orbiting the earth and the concept of changing orbit is really quite simple.  It's really just a matter of getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
Hm, any rocket/spacecraft taking off from Earth to enter space/Universe orbits Earth. And that's it! You cannot start orbiting anything else, e.g. by getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
You are going too fast and cannot adjust speed due to lack of fuel.
Anders, you do understand that when you head off to the moon, you are still under the earth's gravitational influence, therefore you are slowing down quite a lot as you depart the earth.  It's not until you get fairly close to the moon that its gravitational influence becomes greater then the earth's and you begin accelerating again.  However, since the moon's gravity is only 1/6th that of the earth, you don't need to slow down very much to enter lunar orbit.

Only stupid people, members of the religious space travel sect, believe otherwise. I feel sorry for them.
But, if you are American, you have no choice. Both Donald and Joe believe in space travel and an American woman on the Moon 2024.
Please stop with the unnecessary insults and mockery.  It does nothing to help your position.
Markjo, please stop repeating your nonsense about your spacecraft slowing down after departure Earth, but that it will speed up when approaching the Moon, etc, etc? The Moon has speed >1000 m/s in one direction and you approach it in another direction at lower speed so you will always miss the target No way to change direction and adjust speed and land on the Moon. Only idiots believe it is possible. Only cheap actors say they have done it. On presidential executive orders!

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Stash

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #332 on: October 17, 2020, 01:54:39 AM »
I invest my savings in plenty companies.
Investing a company does not automatically make you an expert on that company.

Topic here is orbits and how they work. I have explained it several times. It is simple. Once in orbit you cannot stop or get out of it.
You must have a different definition of "explain" than the rest of the English speaking world.  Saying that you cannot get out of an orbit is not the same as explaining why you cannot get out of an orbit.

Orbiting the moon or sun is no different than orbiting the earth and the concept of changing orbit is really quite simple.  It's really just a matter of getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
Hm, any rocket/spacecraft taking off from Earth to enter space/Universe orbits Earth. And that's it! You cannot start orbiting anything else, e.g. by getting within your celestial body of choice's gravitational field and adjusting your speed accordingly.
You are going too fast and cannot adjust speed due to lack of fuel.

Why is there a lack of fuel? I thought you agreed that spacecrafts can carry fuel?
Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

How much is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity. 

That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

Arianespace does what they do because that's the business they decided to be in - Launching satellites. Has Arianespace ever stated that they do not perform other types of space endeavors because they can't be done? Of course not. So your statement is nonsense and irrelevant.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #333 on: October 17, 2020, 01:54:53 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #334 on: October 17, 2020, 08:38:37 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 08:45:08 AM by Heiwa »

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Stash

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #335 on: October 17, 2020, 09:42:17 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.



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markjo

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #336 on: October 17, 2020, 09:48:17 AM »
Markjo, please stop repeating your nonsense about your spacecraft slowing down after departure Earth, but that it will speed up when approaching the Moon, etc, etc? The Moon has speed >1000 m/s in one direction and you approach it in another direction at lower speed so you will always miss the target
*sigh* I thought that we sorted this out already. 

Yes, the moon is moving at a known speed and in a known orbit.  That means that you can aim for where the moon will be based on your speed, rather than where it currently is.


No way to change direction and adjust speed and land on the Moon.
I'm sorry that you lack the imagination to see possible solutions to those problems.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #337 on: October 17, 2020, 10:47:12 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #338 on: October 17, 2020, 10:51:57 AM »
Markjo, please stop repeating your nonsense about your spacecraft slowing down after departure Earth, but that it will speed up when approaching the Moon, etc, etc? The Moon has speed >1000 m/s in one direction and you approach it in another direction at lower speed so you will always miss the target
*sigh* I thought that we sorted this out already. 

Yes, the moon is moving at a known speed and in a known orbit.  That means that you can aim for where the moon will be based on your speed, rather than where it currently is.


No way to change direction and adjust speed and land on the Moon.
I'm sorry that you lack the imagination to see possible solutions to those problems.
No, the Moon is moving at >1000 m/s in one direction in space and you approach it with a manned, teapot spacecraft at less velocity in another direction and ... ? You will never collide with the Moon or land on it. Only idiots believe that you can approach on object doing >1000 m/s speed and land on it.

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Stash

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #339 on: October 17, 2020, 10:53:23 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #340 on: October 17, 2020, 11:06:59 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

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Stash

  • 6038
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #341 on: October 17, 2020, 11:29:28 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

That's an opinion and not helpful. You've been provided with all the data dozens of times by dozens of people regarding fuel capacity, burn durations, vectoring, distances, etc to change orbits. So based upon that data and your calculations can you show how they didn't have enough fuel to do what they claimed to do? This is literally the only way to make your challenge legitimate. Otherwise there's no benchmark as to why it couldn't be done.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #342 on: October 17, 2020, 11:45:14 AM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

That's an opinion and not helpful. You've been provided with all the data dozens of times by dozens of people regarding fuel capacity, burn durations, vectoring, distances, etc to change orbits. So based upon that data and your calculations can you show how they didn't have enough fuel to do what they claimed to do? This is literally the only way to make your challenge legitimate. Otherwise there's no benchmark as to why it couldn't be done.
According Dr. PhD, Buzz Aldrin he just pushed a button 1969 to change orbits and land on the Moon. He sounds like an alcholic to me. Has he been tested?

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Stash

  • 6038
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #343 on: October 17, 2020, 12:02:49 PM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

That's an opinion and not helpful. You've been provided with all the data dozens of times by dozens of people regarding fuel capacity, burn durations, vectoring, distances, etc to change orbits. So based upon that data and your calculations can you show how they didn't have enough fuel to do what they claimed to do? This is literally the only way to make your challenge legitimate. Otherwise there's no benchmark as to why it couldn't be done.
According Dr. PhD, Buzz Aldrin he just pushed a button 1969 to change orbits and land on the Moon. He sounds like an alcholic to me. Has he been tested?

It's impressive how you perpetually prove yourself to be a fraud with every post. At least you're consistent. 

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #344 on: October 17, 2020, 12:24:03 PM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

That's an opinion and not helpful. You've been provided with all the data dozens of times by dozens of people regarding fuel capacity, burn durations, vectoring, distances, etc to change orbits. So based upon that data and your calculations can you show how they didn't have enough fuel to do what they claimed to do? This is literally the only way to make your challenge legitimate. Otherwise there's no benchmark as to why it couldn't be done.
According Dr. PhD, Buzz Aldrin he just pushed a button 1969 to change orbits and land on the Moon. He sounds like an alcholic to me. Has he been tested?

It's impressive how you perpetually prove yourself to be a fraud with every post. At least you're consistent.
I am not a fraud. Everyone knows who I am at http://heiwaco.com . I am not anonymous. Like you.

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Stash

  • 6038
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #345 on: October 17, 2020, 12:47:56 PM »

Of course you can carry fuel but not enough to change speed and orbits.

Changing speed changes orbits.
A fart can change speed ergo orbit.



That's why Arianespace only sends very lightweight objects, 100% electronic, into one-way orbits.

No mechanical objects? Like a rocket engine?
As I understand it since 25 years Arianespace SA only sends their clients low weight, unmanned satellites/spacecrafts into one way orbits from Earth using rockets. After that the owners of the satellites/spacecrafts can do whatever the like with them.

"On August 15, 2020 Arianespace launched their Ariane 5 rocket with three satellites on board. One of which was the Galaxy-30, a geostationary communications satellite for Intelsat. Satellite is built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS) and is planned to provide video distribution and broadcast services to customers in North America.
Galaxy 30 satellite is launched in tandem with MEV-2 vehicle. MEV-2, which stands for Mission Extension Vehicle-2, is the second servicing mission by NGIS. MEV-2 will rendezvous and dock with the Intelsat 1002 satellite in early 2021. Then, MEV-2 will use its own thrusters and fuel supply to control the satellite’s orbit, thereby extending its useful lifetime."

https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/ariane-5-eca-galaxy-30-mev-2-bsat-4b/

Electronic only?

And you still haven't answered the questions: How much fuel is not enough? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.

Arianespace puts their clients satellites in orbits using its rockets. One rocket may put several satellites in different orbits in space. After that the rocket returns to Earth and burns up in the atmosphere. It has been done 100's of times.  In orbit the owners of the satellites may do whatever they want with their satellites.
If an owner wants to go to the Moon he must get out of the original orbit which requires fuel. Plenty clients of Arianespace say that their spacecrafts put into LEO by Arianespace have left LEO and gone off to asteroids using electronics, etc, but it is pure lies.

That's great and all that you think it's all lies, but you have no evidence for that claim.

Now, how much fuel is not enough to change orbits? In other words, what's your calculation for how much fuel would be necessary in relation to what a spacecraft could carry? It makes no sense to say they can't carry enough fuel if you don't say how much fuel would be needed versus capacity.
I just refer to the clowns saying that they, aboard on their spacecrafts, have changes orbits and landed on the Moon. They look like liars to me.
So how much fuel did they use to change orbits? They just pushed on a button and a computer did it. 1969.

That's an opinion and not helpful. You've been provided with all the data dozens of times by dozens of people regarding fuel capacity, burn durations, vectoring, distances, etc to change orbits. So based upon that data and your calculations can you show how they didn't have enough fuel to do what they claimed to do? This is literally the only way to make your challenge legitimate. Otherwise there's no benchmark as to why it couldn't be done.
According Dr. PhD, Buzz Aldrin he just pushed a button 1969 to change orbits and land on the Moon. He sounds like an alcholic to me. Has he been tested?

It's impressive how you perpetually prove yourself to be a fraud with every post. At least you're consistent.
I am not a fraud. Everyone knows who I am at http://heiwaco.com . I am not anonymous. Like you.

If you say so. But all evidence proves fraud. You can't even show how changing orbits is impossible when given all of the data showing how it is done. Your only response is that Buzz was drunk and rocket scientists won't return your calls. That makes for a fraudulent challenge. And that makes you a fraud. And just because you have a website doesn't mean you are actually Anders. I'm beginning to suspect that is all a fraud as well.

If you can't show a way how all of the data and calculations are wrong, then you literally have nothing. Sorry, that's just a fact.

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markjo

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #346 on: October 17, 2020, 01:15:59 PM »
No, the Moon is moving at >1000 m/s in one direction in space and you approach it with a manned, teapot spacecraft at less velocity in another direction and ... ? You will never collide with the Moon or land on it. Only idiots believe that you can approach on object doing >1000 m/s speed and land on it.
The speed of the moon is known (1011 m/s) and its trajectory is known (a really big circle around the earth).  The speed of your spacecraft is also known and can be adjusted as needed.  So, what's so hard about aiming your spacecraft where you know the moon will be at a given time based on your speed?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #347 on: October 17, 2020, 04:00:58 PM »
No, the Moon is moving at >1000 m/s in one direction in space and you approach it with a manned, teapot spacecraft at less velocity in another direction and ... ? You will never collide with the Moon or land on it. Only idiots believe that you can approach on object doing >1000 m/s speed and land on it.
The speed of the moon is known (1011 m/s) and its trajectory is known (a really big circle around the earth).  The speed of your spacecraft is also known and can be adjusted as needed.  So, what's so hard about aiming your spacecraft where you know the moon will be at a given time based on your speed?
The Moon orbits the Earth in one plane and direction since  millions of years. It has more or less constant speed but the direction changes all the time. Your spacecraft is in another orbit around Earth with variable speed and direction after take off. If you think that you can blast off from a rotating Earth and arrive at the Moon, when it passes by at 1011 m/s in a known direction and that you can adjust your direction and speed so you can land, you are simply mistaken.

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #348 on: October 17, 2020, 04:02:24 PM »
Markjo, please stop repeating your nonsense about your spacecraft slowing down after departure Earth, but that it will speed up when approaching the Moon, etc, etc? The Moon has speed >1000 m/s in one direction and you approach it in another direction at lower speed so you will always miss the target
*sigh* I thought that we sorted this out already. 

Yes, the moon is moving at a known speed and in a known orbit.  That means that you can aim for where the moon will be based on your speed, rather than where it currently is.


No way to change direction and adjust speed and land on the Moon.
I'm sorry that you lack the imagination to see possible solutions to those problems.
No, the Moon is moving at >1000 m/s in one direction in space and you approach it with a manned, teapot spacecraft at less velocity in another direction and ... ? You will never collide with the Moon or land on it. Only idiots believe that you can approach on object doing >1000 m/s speed and land on it.

If what you say were true, you couldn't catch up to say a moving bus and then move between them?






OR even better example.  Jump out of one plane, catch up to another and then enter it.

« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 04:04:26 PM by NotSoSkeptical »
Eternal rest grant to him, O Lord; and let light perpetual shine upon him. May his soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace.

RAB.

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frenat

  • 3602
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #349 on: October 17, 2020, 04:45:24 PM »
No, the Moon is moving at >1000 m/s in one direction in space and you approach it with a manned, teapot spacecraft at less velocity in another direction and ... ? You will never collide with the Moon or land on it. Only idiots believe that you can approach on object doing >1000 m/s speed and land on it.
The speed of the moon is known (1011 m/s) and its trajectory is known (a really big circle around the earth).  The speed of your spacecraft is also known and can be adjusted as needed.  So, what's so hard about aiming your spacecraft where you know the moon will be at a given time based on your speed?
The Moon orbits the Earth in one plane and direction since  millions of years. It has more or less constant speed but the direction changes all the time. Your spacecraft is in another orbit around Earth with variable speed and direction after take off. If you think that you can blast off from a rotating Earth and arrive at the Moon, when it passes by at 1011 m/s in a known direction and that you can adjust your direction and speed so you can land, you are simply mistaken.
Translation: I don't understand it so I assume nobody else does either.

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markjo

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #350 on: October 17, 2020, 08:55:24 PM »
The Moon orbits the Earth in one plane and direction since  millions of years. It has more or less constant speed but the direction changes all the time.
The moon travels in at a constant speed a circle centered on the earth.  It's not that hard to predict where it's going to be at any given time.

Your spacecraft is in another orbit around Earth with variable speed and direction after take off.
The spacecraft speed varies based on known influences such as the gravitational influences of the earth, moon and sun, as well as the thrust applied by the rocket engine.

If you think that you can blast off from a rotating Earth and arrive at the Moon, when it passes by at 1011 m/s in a known direction and that you can adjust your direction and speed so you can land, you are simply mistaken.
Why am I wrong?  The rotation of the earth doesn't really matter.  Why is it so hard to control my speed and direction and speed in space?  It's not as if NASA and the Soviets didn't practice a number of times with unmanned orbiters and landers before risking human moon missions.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 08:57:15 PM by markjo »
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #351 on: October 17, 2020, 10:04:08 PM »
The Moon orbits the Earth in one plane and direction since  millions of years. It has more or less constant speed but the direction changes all the time.
The moon travels in at a constant speed a circle centered on the earth.  It's not that hard to predict where it's going to be at any given time.

Your spacecraft is in another orbit around Earth with variable speed and direction after take off.
The spacecraft speed varies based on known influences such as the gravitational influences of the earth, moon and sun, as well as the thrust applied by the rocket engine.

If you think that you can blast off from a rotating Earth and arrive at the Moon, when it passes by at 1011 m/s in a known direction and that you can adjust your direction and speed so you can land, you are simply mistaken.
Why am I wrong?  The rotation of the earth doesn't really matter.  Why is it so hard to control my speed and direction and speed in space?  It's not as if NASA and the Soviets didn't practice a number of times with unmanned orbiters and landers before risking human moon missions.
Thanks for asking.
Taking off from a rotating planet Earth affects your departure velocity and direction. You really have to take off at the right time in the right location.
Your departure time affects the location of your target (the Moon).
Your own speed/direction will vary all the time due to gravity, etc.
But OK - you do it in two steps. First step is to move into high speed LEO. And in LEO, second step, you blast off to the Moon at the right location, time, direction, etc, in LEO. Your speed increases from 7000 to 11000 m/s which takes time. How do you do this trans lunar injection move?
And then, third step, you are in a modified orbit that will bring you to the Moon. You leave Earth LEO behind and fly away. Speed is reduced all the time and your direction is also changed and then the Moon is coming in sight. It moves at 1011 m/s in another direction. There are many trajectories to chose.
Say that your arrival speed is 1011 m/s at 90° vertically towards the Moon. You are still orbiting Earth. What is step FOUR?
You brake hard and land? Not possible!
So you, somewhere else in spave (location, time, speed, direction unknown in Earth orbit) you start orbiting the Moon! But how? At one moment you were orbiting Earth and then, suddenly, you are magically orbiting the Moon. But how?
Pushing a button and your onboard computer takes care of it automatically. Your spacecraft rocket pushes you from one orbit to another?
And the Soviets did it. ROTFL! They just produced communist propaganda lies all the time. Still do!
Let's face it. There is no way to leave an Earth orbit and start orbiting a Moon in it's 1011 m/s speed orbit around Earth.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 06:32:55 PM by Heiwa »

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markjo

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #352 on: October 18, 2020, 07:04:45 PM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #353 on: October 18, 2020, 07:29:07 PM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
All objects ejected from planet Earth evidently orbits planet Earth at different altitudes, velocities and directions. E.g. Arianespace does it all the time with objects given to them. They use a rocket to put the object in orbit around Earth.
But how can an object orbiting Earth suddenly start orbiting the Moon, planet Mars och the Sun?
Nobody can explain it!

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Stash

  • 6038
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #354 on: October 18, 2020, 08:39:22 PM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
All objects ejected from planet Earth evidently orbits planet Earth at different altitudes, velocities and directions. E.g. Arianespace does it all the time with objects given to them. They use a rocket to put the object in orbit around Earth.
But how can an object orbiting Earth suddenly start orbiting the Moon, planet Mars och the Sun?
Nobody can explain it!

Now you're just lying. It's been explained so many times it's ridiculous. You've even been give the data and calculations to do so so many times it's ridiculous. And you've never once come back with or posted on your silly website any data/calculations of your own to show them being wrong. So I'm at a loss. Since you've moved into straight up lying mode there's really no where else to go with this if that's all we can expect.

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Heiwa

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #355 on: October 18, 2020, 10:13:44 PM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
All objects ejected from planet Earth evidently orbits planet Earth at different altitudes, velocities and directions. E.g. Arianespace does it all the time with objects given to them. They use a rocket to put the object in orbit around Earth.
But how can an object orbiting Earth suddenly start orbiting the Moon, planet Mars och the Sun?
Nobody can explain it!

Now you're just lying. It's been explained so many times it's ridiculous. You've even been give the data and calculations to do so so many times it's ridiculous. And you've never once come back with or posted on your silly website any data/calculations of your own to show them being wrong. So I'm at a loss. Since you've moved into straight up lying mode there's really no where else to go with this if that's all we can expect.
Sorry. I and Arianespace know all about circular orbits around Earth at different altitudes/velocities. No problems at all. Gravity and centrifugal forces in LEO or GEO are in balance and you are weightless and float around inside your craft. But then? You go off to the Moon. Velocity increases from 7000 to 11000 m/s and direction change by applying a rocket force for a certain time burning plenty fuel. Your orbit becomes very elliptical You aim forward of the moving Moon. When the rocket is switched off, gravity force slows you down and your direction changes all the time. You are no longer weightless. You can walk on the floor again! How you calculate your trajectory and arrival time at the Moon are unclear. They depend on your trajectory.
All agrees that you slow down and, if you miss the Moon, your velocity will become 0 and you'll drop back on Earth again at increased velocity. You are still in orbit. No problem at all.
But it is suggested that you arrive close to the Moon at a certain time, speed and direction and that you fire your rocket engine again for a few minutes and ... magic ... you leave your orbit around Earth and ... fantastic ... you start to orbit the Moon with its speed 1011 m/s around the Earth.
Nobody can explain how! The Apollo 11 clowns just pushed a button and a computer did the rest. And in orbit around the Moon you are weightless again.

Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #356 on: October 18, 2020, 11:02:28 PM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
All objects ejected from planet Earth evidently orbits planet Earth at different altitudes, velocities and directions. E.g. Arianespace does it all the time with objects given to them. They use a rocket to put the object in orbit around Earth.
But how can an object orbiting Earth suddenly start orbiting the Moon, planet Mars och the Sun?
Nobody can explain it!

Now you're just lying. It's been explained so many times it's ridiculous. You've even been give the data and calculations to do so so many times it's ridiculous. And you've never once come back with or posted on your silly website any data/calculations of your own to show them being wrong. So I'm at a loss. Since you've moved into straight up lying mode there's really no where else to go with this if that's all we can expect.
Sorry. I and Arianespace know all about circular orbits around Earth at different altitudes/velocities. No problems at all. Gravity and centrifugal forces in LEO or GEO are in balance and you are weightless and float around inside your craft. But then? You go off to the Moon. Velocity increases from 7000 to 11000 m/s and direction change by applying a rocket force for a certain time burning plenty fuel. Your orbit becomes very elliptical You aim forward of the moving Moon. When the rocket is switched off, gravity force slows you down and your direction changes all the time. You are no longer weightless. You can walk on the floor again! How you calculate your trajectory and arrival time at the Moon are unclear. They depend on your trajectory.
All agrees that you slow down and, if you miss the Moon, your velocity will become 0 and you'll drop back on Earth again at increased velocity. You are still in orbit. No problem at all.
But it is suggested that you arrive close to the Moon at a certain time, speed and direction and that you fire your rocket engine again for a few minutes and ... magic ... you leave your orbit around Earth and ... fantastic ... you start to orbit the Moon with its speed 1011 m/s around the Earth.
Nobody can explain how! The Apollo 11 clowns just pushed a button and a computer did the rest. And in orbit around the Moon you are weightless again.
The problem here is that you almost have it right, to get to the moon you have a short burn, Coast there and when you arrive at the Moon,  you have a second burn to put you in orbit around the moon. From there  you separate your landing craft  land do your business on the surface and return to the orbital craft, discard the lander, then do your burn to return to earth.
The the universe has no obligation to makes sense to you.
The earth is a globe.

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Heiwa

  • 8735
  • I have been around a long time.
Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #357 on: October 19, 2020, 01:41:45 AM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
All objects ejected from planet Earth evidently orbits planet Earth at different altitudes, velocities and directions. E.g. Arianespace does it all the time with objects given to them. They use a rocket to put the object in orbit around Earth.
But how can an object orbiting Earth suddenly start orbiting the Moon, planet Mars och the Sun?
Nobody can explain it!

Now you're just lying. It's been explained so many times it's ridiculous. You've even been give the data and calculations to do so so many times it's ridiculous. And you've never once come back with or posted on your silly website any data/calculations of your own to show them being wrong. So I'm at a loss. Since you've moved into straight up lying mode there's really no where else to go with this if that's all we can expect.
Sorry. I and Arianespace know all about circular orbits around Earth at different altitudes/velocities. No problems at all. Gravity and centrifugal forces in LEO or GEO are in balance and you are weightless and float around inside your craft. But then? You go off to the Moon. Velocity increases from 7000 to 11000 m/s and direction change by applying a rocket force for a certain time burning plenty fuel. Your orbit becomes very elliptical You aim forward of the moving Moon. When the rocket is switched off, gravity force slows you down and your direction changes all the time. You are no longer weightless. You can walk on the floor again! How you calculate your trajectory and arrival time at the Moon are unclear. They depend on your trajectory.
All agrees that you slow down and, if you miss the Moon, your velocity will become 0 and you'll drop back on Earth again at increased velocity. You are still in orbit. No problem at all.
But it is suggested that you arrive close to the Moon at a certain time, speed and direction and that you fire your rocket engine again for a few minutes and ... magic ... you leave your orbit around Earth and ... fantastic ... you start to orbit the Moon with its speed 1011 m/s around the Earth.
Nobody can explain how! The Apollo 11 clowns just pushed a button and a computer did the rest. And in orbit around the Moon you are weightless again.
The problem here is that you almost have it right, to get to the moon you have a short burn, Coast there and when you arrive at the Moon,  you have a second burn to put you in orbit around the moon. From there  you separate your landing craft  land do your business on the surface and return to the orbital craft, discard the lander, then do your burn to return to earth.
Sorry, it doesn't work! Arriving close to the Moon at 1000 m/s speed, short burns getting out of one orbit and entering another, landing, having a piss at the South Pole, take off, docking, short burn, dropping down on Earth, arriving at atmosphere with 11000 m/s speed, braking by friction, landing in the ocean close to a ship, bla, bla, bla. On what drugs are you?

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markjo

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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #358 on: October 19, 2020, 06:24:41 AM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
I have provided links to several textbooks about orbital mechanics but you obviously just ignored them.  Here's another one for you to deny.
http://www.nssc.ac.cn/wxzygx/weixin/201607/P020160718380095698873.pdf
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

Heiwa

  • 8735
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Re: Orbits. How do they work?
« Reply #359 on: October 19, 2020, 10:35:19 AM »
We have provided information to answer all of those questions numerous times.  What more can we do to satisfy you?
Why do you say that? Who has provided any info to me or anyone about changing orbits in space?
I have provided links to several textbooks about orbital mechanics but you obviously just ignored them.  Here's another one for you to deny.
http://www.nssc.ac.cn/wxzygx/weixin/201607/P020160718380095698873.pdf
Yes, Thanks a lot. But topic is something else. However, Howard D. Curtis of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, is a 2005 expert of space travel. He likes Hohmann transfers where it  take years to go from one orbit to another, if you are there at the right time in 3D space to do it, when the orbits contact each other, when you are there.
You cannot go to the Moon with his ideas. This Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, (https://daytonabeach.erau.edu/ ) looks like Disney Land to me. How much does it cost to join? Nobody knows.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2020, 10:38:19 AM by Heiwa »