Same mass but different number of moles - Why?

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Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« on: September 12, 2020, 03:49:19 AM »
Please recheck the following before making your own calculation

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L (22.4 dm^3)

Number of moles = Molecule Given or Atoms Given/ Avogadro’s number 

WATER: One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at maximum density (+4 °C) and standard pressure

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1 L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.04464286


Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

PLATINUM: Of which the standard Kilogram is made of (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram)
Atomic mass of platinum = 195.084
Mass of 1 Kg of Plaitinum = 1000 g

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000/195.084
Number of moles = 5.125


One liter of platinum weighs 21.45 kg (source internet)

Therefore volume of one liter (1L) of platinum = 1/21.45 L=0.04662005

Number of moles = (1/21.45) L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.00208125

ANY REASONS
[/b]
« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 04:13:34 AM by E E K »

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JJA

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2020, 04:49:41 AM »
ANY REASONS
[/b]

It's very simple.  A mole is just 6.02214076×1023 atoms.

Since every atom has a different atomic mass, one mole of hydrogen atoms will weight less than one mole of lead atoms.

It's like asking why 100 bricks weighs more than 100 feathers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(unit)

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2020, 09:56:48 AM »
Please recheck the following before making your own calculation

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Yes

Quote
Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L (22.4 dm^3)
Yes. But remember this is for a gas. I think you don't know this.

Quote
Number of moles = Molecule Given or Atoms Given/ Avogadro’s number 
yes

Quote
WATER: One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at maximum density (+4 °C) and standard pressure

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1 L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.04464286
1L of water at STP would somehow be a gas.

Quote
Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556
This is one litre of liquid water. Not the same as gas.

Quote
PLATINUM: Of which the standard Kilogram is made of (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram)
Atomic mass of platinum = 195.084
Mass of 1 Kg of Plaitinum = 1000 g

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000/195.084
Number of moles = 5.125
Yes

Quote
One liter of platinum weighs 21.45 kg (source internet)
ok

Quote
Therefore volume of one liter (1L) of platinum = 1/21.45 L=0.04662005

Number of moles = (1/21.45) L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.00208125

ANY REASONS
[/b]
That litre of platinum will not be a gas. You cannot use the 22.4 L per mole for it.
Here are some other errors.
Quote
Therefore volume of one liter (1L) of platinum = 1/21.45 L=0.04662005
The volume of 1 L of platinum is 1 L. You did 1 L/21.45 kg = 0.047 L/kg. This is the inverse of density. You want 21450/1000= 21.45 g/ml or 21.45 g/cm3.

Here is how it's really done:
21.45 kg * 1000g/kg =  21450 g          21450 g * 1 mol / 195.084 g = 109.95 mol.  How I laid it out you can see the "g" cancels out and you are left with mol.


Quote
Number of moles = (1/21.45) L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.00208125
Once again 22.4 L is for gases. Plus once again since you omit units you have a problem. Its 22.4 L/mol. You did this earlier too.

I hope this helps.
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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2020, 11:48:45 PM »
Please recheck the following before making your own calculation

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Yes

Quote
Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L (22.4 dm^3)
Yes. But remember this is for a gas. I think you don't know this.

Quote
Number of moles = Molecule Given or Atoms Given/ Avogadro’s number 
yes

Quote
WATER: One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at maximum density (+4 °C) and standard pressure

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1 L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.04464286
1L of water at STP would somehow be a gas.

Quote
Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556
This is one litre of liquid water. Not the same as gas.

Quote
PLATINUM: Of which the standard Kilogram is made of (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram)
Atomic mass of platinum = 195.084
Mass of 1 Kg of Plaitinum = 1000 g

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000/195.084
Number of moles = 5.125
Yes

Quote
One liter of platinum weighs 21.45 kg (source internet)
ok

Quote
Therefore volume of one liter (1L) of platinum = 1/21.45 L=0.04662005

Number of moles = (1/21.45) L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.00208125

ANY REASONS
[/b]
That litre of platinum will not be a gas. You cannot use the 22.4 L per mole for it.
Here are some other errors.
Quote
Therefore volume of one liter (1L) of platinum = 1/21.45 L=0.04662005
The volume of 1 L of platinum is 1 L. You did 1 L/21.45 kg = 0.047 L/kg. This is the inverse of density. You want 21450/1000= 21.45 g/ml or 21.45 g/cm3.

Here is how it's really done:
21.45 kg * 1000g/kg =  21450 g          21450 g * 1 mol / 195.084 g = 109.95 mol.  How I laid it out you can see the "g" cancels out and you are left with mol.


Quote
Number of moles = (1/21.45) L/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 0.00208125
Once again 22.4 L is for gases. Plus once again since you omit units you have a problem. Its 22.4 L/mol. You did this earlier too.

I hope this helps.
TY, I messed up with 1.0L of water as 1000g. TY – Sorry I didn’t even realize. But again

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30 shouldn't be this 55.55


Equation:
2H2O→2H2 + O2

2 mol H2O to produce 2mol H2 and 1 mol O2

55.55 mol H2O to produce 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.775 mol O2

Now volume of H2 and O2 at STP

1 mol H2 and 1 mol O2 each has volume 22.4L

Volume of H2 released  = 55.55mol * 22.4L/mol = 1,244L

Volume of O2 released = 27.775*2204 =622L

Total gas releases: 1244 +622=1866

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2020, 12:32:57 AM »

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30 shouldn't be this 55.55
 

Equation:
2H2O→2H2 + O2

2 mol H2O to produce 2mol H2 and 1 mol O2

55.55 mol H2O to produce 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.775 mol O2

Now volume of H2 and O2 at STP

1 mol H2 and 1 mol O2 each has volume 22.4L

Volume of H2 released  = 55.55mol * 22.4L/mol = 1,244L

Volume of O2 released = 27.775*2204 =622L

Total gas releases: 1244 +622=1866

1 mol of water require 1 mol of H2 and 1/2 mol of O.

So 55.55 mol of water requires 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.78 mol O 

55.55+27.78 = 83.33

That's were the 83.33 comes from.

Everything works perfect.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2020, 08:45:56 AM »

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30 shouldn't be this 55.55
 

Equation:
2H2O→2H2 + O2

2 mol H2O to produce 2mol H2 and 1 mol O2

55.55 mol H2O to produce 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.775 mol O2

Now volume of H2 and O2 at STP

1 mol H2 and 1 mol O2 each has volume 22.4L

Volume of H2 released  = 55.55mol * 22.4L/mol = 1,244L

Volume of O2 released = 27.775*2204 =622L

Total gas releases: 1244 +622=1866

1 mol of water require 1 mol of H2 and 1/2 mol of O.

So 55.55 mol of water requires 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.78 mol O 

55.55+27.78 = 83.33

That's were the 83.33 comes from.

Everything works perfect.
One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at stp.

Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30

My question is how comes 55.56 mole of H2O produces 83.30 moles (gases hydrogen and oxygen)

Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles

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JJA

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2020, 09:09:02 AM »
My question is how comes 55.56 mole of H2O produces 83.30 moles (gases hydrogen and oxygen)

Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles

You are not understanding what a mole is.

A mole is just a specific number of particles.  It's just a unit of measurement.

A mole is 6.02214076×1023 of something.

Just like a million is 1,000,000 of something.

Or a thousand is 1,000 of something.

A car is made with 4 tires. So 1 million cars = 4 million tires. Or 1 mole of cars = 4 moles of tires.

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2020, 09:11:12 AM »
One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at stp.

Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30

My question is how comes 55.56 mole of H2O produces 83.30 moles (gases hydrogen and oxygen)

Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles


It's very simple.  A mole is just 6.02214076×1023 atoms.


A mole is the amount of atoms or molecules. You can take two atoms and get one molecule out of it.

If you have 20 slices of bread and 10 slices of cheese, you get 10 sandwiches, not 20 or 30.

Here is what I said

"So 55.55 mol of water requires 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.78 mol O "

To get water from hydrogen and oxygen you need 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. Three atoms go into one molecule.

Another way, you can start with one piece of glass and when it breaks you get many pieces of glass.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

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markjo

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2020, 10:42:26 AM »
Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles
55.56 moles of what = 55.56 moles of what?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2020, 03:14:13 AM »
One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at stp.

Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30

My question is how comes 55.56 mole of H2O produces 83.30 moles (gases hydrogen and oxygen)

Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles


It's very simple.  A mole is just 6.02214076×1023 atoms.


A mole is the amount of atoms or molecules. You can take two atoms and get one molecule out of it.

If you have 20 slices of bread and 10 slices of cheese, you get 10 sandwiches, not 20 or 30.

Here is what I said

"So 55.55 mol of water requires 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.78 mol O "

To get water from hydrogen and oxygen you need 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. Three atoms go into one molecule.

Another way, you can start with one piece of glass and when it breaks you get many pieces of glass.
What i said, in simple words

As 1.0Kg (1.0L) of water in liquid form = 1866 L of water in gasous form (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2), therefore

# of particles that conated water in liquid form must equal to (=) # of particles in gaseous form (hydrogen and oxygen)

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2020, 04:13:47 AM »
One liter is defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water at stp.

Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produces 1866 L of gas. (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles = Volume Given at STP/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 1866/ 22.4 L
Number of moles = 83.30

My question is how comes 55.56 mole of H2O produces 83.30 moles (gases hydrogen and oxygen)

Shouldn’t be 55.56 moles = 55.56 moles


It's very simple.  A mole is just 6.02214076×1023 atoms.


A mole is the amount of atoms or molecules. You can take two atoms and get one molecule out of it.

If you have 20 slices of bread and 10 slices of cheese, you get 10 sandwiches, not 20 or 30.

Here is what I said

"So 55.55 mol of water requires 55.55 mol H2 and 55.55/2 = 27.78 mol O "

To get water from hydrogen and oxygen you need 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. Three atoms go into one molecule.

Another way, you can start with one piece of glass and when it breaks you get many pieces of glass.
What i said, in simple words

As 1.0Kg (1.0L) of water in liquid form = 1866 L of water in gasous form (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2), therefore

# of particles that conated water in liquid form must equal to (=) # of particles in gaseous form (hydrogen and oxygen)

No. You are taking 1 water particle and turingit into 2 particles, 1 H2 and 1 O.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

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markjo

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2020, 06:24:05 AM »
As 1.0Kg (1.0L) of water in liquid form = 1866 L of water in gasous form (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2), therefore

# of particles that conated water in liquid form must equal to (=) # of particles in gaseous form (hydrogen and oxygen)
If you're counting the number of particles, then whether the water is in liquid or gaseous form is irrelevant.

However, if you're counting the number of particles, then whether you're counting atoms or molecules is very relevant.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2020, 09:34:05 AM »
As 1.0Kg (1.0L) of water in liquid form = 1866 L of water in gasous form (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2), therefore

# of particles that conated water in liquid form must equal to (=) # of particles in gaseous form (hydrogen and oxygen)
If you're counting the number of particles, then whether the water is in liquid or gaseous form is irrelevant.

However, if you're counting the number of particles, then whether you're counting atoms or molecules is very relevant.
i meant atomic particles

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2020, 09:54:07 AM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
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markjo

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2020, 10:10:33 AM »
As 1.0Kg (1.0L) of water in liquid form = 1866 L of water in gasous form (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2), therefore

# of particles that conated water in liquid form must equal to (=) # of particles in gaseous form (hydrogen and oxygen)
If you're counting the number of particles, then whether the water is in liquid or gaseous form is irrelevant.

However, if you're counting the number of particles, then whether you're counting atoms or molecules is very relevant.
i meant atomic particles
If you're counting individual atoms, then 166.68 moles (55.556 H2O molecules * 3 atoms/molecule) is the correct number.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2020, 12:05:25 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2020, 12:42:03 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
Yes. No one has claimed otherwise.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

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markjo

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2020, 12:42:41 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
H2O is a molecule made up of 3 atoms.  It doesn't matter if you count the atoms or the molecules, but you must be consistent.  That's why we keep stressing the importance of units so that everyone knows what you're counting.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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JJA

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2020, 05:01:28 AM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something

You understand that a molecule is made of atoms, right?  1 H2O molecule contains 3 atoms.

A mole is just a unit like million or thousand.  It's not a weight or volume, it's just a number unit like thousand, million or billion or dozen.

Remember the car analogy.  If I have a mole of cars and then take off all the tires, I now have 4 moles of tires.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2020, 10:37:09 AM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
Yes. No one has claimed otherwise.
Total number of atoms contain in 1.0L as 1000g of liquid water must equal to the total number of atoms contained in a gas released by 1000g of liquid water but they are not.

A mole of water molecules contains 2 moles of hydrogen atoms and 1 mole of oxygen atoms.

Avogadro's number is 6.023×10^23 molecules/mole.
One mole of water =6.023×10^23   molecules of water.
1 molecule of water = 3 atoms of water.
One mole of water =3×6.023×10^23=1.807×10^24   atoms.
Now
Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

55.56 moles of water as liquid = 55.56 x 3×6.023×10^23 = 1.0039x10^26

Total number of atoms = 1.0039x10^26

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produce 1866 L of gas (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles of hydrogen = 1244/22.4 = 55.54
Number of moles of oxygen = 622/22.4= 27.76

Atoms contain in 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 3.346x10^25

Atoms contain in 2x 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 2x55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 6.69x10^25

Atoms contain in 27.76 moles of oxygen = 27.76 x  6.023×10^23=1.67x10^25

Total number of atoms = 8.36 x10^25

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JJA

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2020, 12:03:50 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
Yes. No one has claimed otherwise.
Total number of atoms contain in 1.0L as 1000g of liquid water must equal to the total number of atoms contained in a gas released by 1000g of liquid water but they are not.

As explained to you many times before, this is because you are performing the conversions wrong.

You can't say 1+1=3 and then claim addition is broken.  The math and physics is fine, your usage of them is the problem.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2020, 12:05:40 PM by JJA »

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markjo

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2020, 01:16:25 PM »
A mole of water molecules contains 2 moles of hydrogen atoms and 1 mole of oxygen atoms.
Yes.  The number of moles in one liter of H2O depends on whether you're counting H2O molecules or if you're counting hydrogen and oxygen atoms.  I'm not sure why you're trying to make it any more complicated than that.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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sokarul

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Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2020, 05:34:09 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
Yes. No one has claimed otherwise.
Total number of atoms contain in 1.0L as 1000g of liquid water must equal to the total number of atoms contained in a gas released by 1000g of liquid water but they are not.

A mole of water molecules contains 2 moles of hydrogen atoms and 1 mole of oxygen atoms.

Avogadro's number is 6.023×10^23 molecules/mole.
One mole of water =6.023×10^23   molecules of water.
1 molecule of water = 3 atoms of water.
One mole of water =3×6.023×10^23=1.807×10^24   atoms.
Now
Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

55.56 moles of water as liquid = 55.56 x 3×6.023×10^23 = 1.0039x10^26

Total number of atoms = 1.0039x10^26

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produce 1866 L of gas (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles of hydrogen = 1244/22.4 = 55.54
Number of moles of oxygen = 622/22.4= 27.76

Atoms contain in 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 3.346x10^25

Atoms contain in 2x 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 2x55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 6.69x10^25

Atoms contain in 27.76 moles of oxygen = 27.76 x  6.023×10^23=1.67x10^25

Total number of atoms = 8.36 x10^25


Rounding error.

You already agree one water molecule breaks down to 3 atoms. That's what it does. So when atom counts don't match you know there is a problem. Rounding error is likely the cause. 
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

Re: Same mass but different number of moles - Why?
« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2020, 11:11:09 PM »
Do you understand if you have one of something and break it in half you now have two of something?
Yes, i do but do you understand that the equal # of atoms before and after breaking of something
Yes. No one has claimed otherwise.
Total number of atoms contain in 1.0L as 1000g of liquid water must equal to the total number of atoms contained in a gas released by 1000g of liquid water but they are not.

A mole of water molecules contains 2 moles of hydrogen atoms and 1 mole of oxygen atoms.

Avogadro's number is 6.023×10^23 molecules/mole.
One mole of water =6.023×10^23   molecules of water.
1 molecule of water = 3 atoms of water.
One mole of water =3×6.023×10^23=1.807×10^24   atoms.
Now
Atomic mass of H2O = 16 + 2 = 18g/moles

Number of moles = Mass Given/(Atomic Mass) or Molecular Mass
Number of moles = 1000g/18
Number of moles = 55.556

55.56 moles of water as liquid = 55.56 x 3×6.023×10^23 = 1.0039x10^26

Total number of atoms = 1.0039x10^26

The mass of 1.0L as 1000g or 55.56 moles of water produce 1866 L of gas (1244L of H2 and 622L of O2).

Number of moles of hydrogen = 1244/22.4 = 55.54
Number of moles of oxygen = 622/22.4= 27.76

Atoms contain in 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 3.346x10^25

Atoms contain in 2x 55.54 moles of hydrogen = 2x55.56 x  6.023×10^23= 6.69x10^25

Atoms contain in 27.76 moles of oxygen = 27.76 x  6.023×10^23=1.67x10^25

Total number of atoms = 8.36 x10^25


Rounding error.
Show me where? Please! - TY