The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emit

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wise

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The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emitted by the sun.

Lets look at the wrong answer first:

Quote
Dear Tom,
Parade Magazines Marilyn Savant says air temperature is the same in the sun as in the shade, but placing a thermometer in the sun heats up the thermometer. Does that make sense? If true, what do they use to measure air temperature?
Mike Beirl, Bolingbrook

Dear Mike,
Air temperature is always measured in a shady location because in the shade the thermometer is measuring the actual air temperature, and only the air temperature. A thermometer placed in the sun measures the temperature that the sun heats the thermometer to, not the true air temperature. When you are in the shade, you are experiencing the true air temperature. In the sun, you are experiencing the true air temperature plus the effect of the suns rays on your body, and consequently it feels warmer than just the air temperature.
Thomas Valle, Source

As we have seen, popular science cannot explain the difference of temperature in the shade and sun with scientific data. It explains it with strange explanations, such as the warming of the Thermometer.



Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature

As we can see, the temperature depends on these three factors and sunlight is one of them. If the moon is not visible or but far away in a day, the effect is zero. Likewise, since the sun is not visible at night, its effect is zero. In exceptional cases, the night effect of the sun is also taken into account.

The effects of both daylight, sunlight and moonlight on the temperature can be easily calculated depends on the distance of the sun and the moon.

Of course, there are other factors that affect the air temperature in a place, such as altitude, distance to the sea, but these factors are not taken into account because they are constant in anywhere.

If you are in the shade, sunlight will have no effect, and in this case the air temperature will be less.

In short, the temperature measured by popular science in the shade is "daylight temperature" and it is erroneous because it does not take into account sunlight.


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rabinoz

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The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emitted by the sun.

Lets look at the wrong answer first:

Quote
Dear Tom,
Parade Magazines Marilyn Savant says air temperature is the same in the sun as in the shade, but placing a thermometer in the sun heats up the thermometer. Does that make sense? If true, what do they use to measure air temperature?
Mike Beirl, Bolingbrook

Dear Mike,
Air temperature is always measured in a shady location because in the shade the thermometer is measuring the actual air temperature, and only the air temperature. A thermometer placed in the sun measures the temperature that the sun heats the thermometer to, not the true air temperature. When you are in the shade, you are experiencing the true air temperature. In the sun, you are experiencing the true air temperature plus the effect of the suns rays on your body, and consequently it feels warmer than just the air temperature.
Thomas Valle, Source

As we have seen, popular science cannot explain the difference of temperature in the shade and sun with scientific data. It explains it with strange explanations, such as the warming of the Thermometer.



Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!

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markjo

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Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
How do you measure sunlight and moonlight temperatures?

In short, the temperature measured by popular science in the shade is "daylight temperature" and it is erroneous because it does not take into account sunlight.
Actually, temperature is measured in the shade so that they don't have to worry about sunlight and moonlight.  Why make things more complicated than they need to be?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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JJA

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Of course, there are other factors that affect the air temperature in a place, such as altitude, distance to the sea, but these factors are not taken into account because they are constant in anywhere.

If you are in the shade, sunlight will have no effect, and in this case the air temperature will be less.

In short, the temperature measured by popular science in the shade is "daylight temperature" and it is erroneous because it does not take into account sunlight.

Wise doesn't understand temperature. 

Why do I have to take into account the "constant" distance to the sea if I want to measure how hot something is?

I can't even begin to parse this nonsense.

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wise

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Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
How do you measure sunlight and moonlight temperatures?

In short, the temperature measured by popular science in the shade is "daylight temperature" and it is erroneous because it does not take into account sunlight.
Actually, temperature is measured in the shade so that they don't have to worry about sunlight and moonlight.  Why make things more complicated than they need to be?
If you measure and subtract the air temperature in the sunlight and in the shade, you will find the temperature of the sunlight. Likewise, the moonlight temperature is calculated. Moon light lowers 2-5 degrees of heat. However, the range of sunlight is more change. There are countless experiments on this subject, you can find it on youtube.


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wise

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The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emitted by the sun.

Lets look at the wrong answer first:

Quote
Dear Tom,
Parade Magazines Marilyn Savant says air temperature is the same in the sun as in the shade, but placing a thermometer in the sun heats up the thermometer. Does that make sense? If true, what do they use to measure air temperature?
Mike Beirl, Bolingbrook

Dear Mike,
Air temperature is always measured in a shady location because in the shade the thermometer is measuring the actual air temperature, and only the air temperature. A thermometer placed in the sun measures the temperature that the sun heats the thermometer to, not the true air temperature. When you are in the shade, you are experiencing the true air temperature. In the sun, you are experiencing the true air temperature plus the effect of the suns rays on your body, and consequently it feels warmer than just the air temperature.
Thomas Valle, Source

As we have seen, popular science cannot explain the difference of temperature in the shade and sun with scientific data. It explains it with strange explanations, such as the warming of the Thermometer.



Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!
Double rubbishinoz! It has been measured and verified. Go and get fact yourself.


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rabinoz

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The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emitted by the sun.

Lets look at the wrong answer first:

Quote
Dear Tom,
Parade Magazines Marilyn Savant says air temperature is the same in the sun as in the shade, but placing a thermometer in the sun heats up the thermometer. Does that make sense? If true, what do they use to measure air temperature?
Mike Beirl, Bolingbrook

Dear Mike,
Air temperature is always measured in a shady location because in the shade the thermometer is measuring the actual air temperature, and only the air temperature. A thermometer placed in the sun measures the temperature that the sun heats the thermometer to, not the true air temperature. When you are in the shade, you are experiencing the true air temperature. In the sun, you are experiencing the true air temperature plus the effect of the suns rays on your body, and consequently it feels warmer than just the air temperature.
Thomas Valle, Source

As we have seen, popular science cannot explain the difference of temperature in the shade and sun with scientific data. It explains it with strange explanations, such as the warming of the Thermometer.



Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!
Double rubbishinoz! It has been measured and verified. Go and get fact yourself.
Double incorrect!
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!

Get used to the facts for a change!

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wise

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The difference in temperature in the shade and under the sun gives the heat emitted by the sun.

Lets look at the wrong answer first:

Quote
Dear Tom,
Parade Magazines Marilyn Savant says air temperature is the same in the sun as in the shade, but placing a thermometer in the sun heats up the thermometer. Does that make sense? If true, what do they use to measure air temperature?
Mike Beirl, Bolingbrook

Dear Mike,
Air temperature is always measured in a shady location because in the shade the thermometer is measuring the actual air temperature, and only the air temperature. A thermometer placed in the sun measures the temperature that the sun heats the thermometer to, not the true air temperature. When you are in the shade, you are experiencing the true air temperature. In the sun, you are experiencing the true air temperature plus the effect of the suns rays on your body, and consequently it feels warmer than just the air temperature.
Thomas Valle, Source

As we have seen, popular science cannot explain the difference of temperature in the shade and sun with scientific data. It explains it with strange explanations, such as the warming of the Thermometer.



Is this the truth? Of course no. In reality, the air temperature is expressed by the formula:

Temperature = Daylight temperature + Sunlight temperature - moonlight temperature
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!
Double rubbishinoz! It has been measured and verified. Go and get fact yourself.
Double incorrect!
Rubbish! The presence or absence of that Moon makes no difference to day or night temperature!

Get used to the facts for a change!
Triple incorrectinoz!
Double rubbishinoz!

It has been measured and verified by many FE'r. There isn't a difference in terms of changing the temperature between moonlight and sunlight. They are lights and have affect to the temperature. It is quite simple to get it.

I can not open youtube at the moment because your FET friends have made it forbid again. If you tell them open the youtube I can show you the evidences. Or I can show you the experiments at this night, if you prefer to wait.


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rabinoz

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Triple incorrectinoz!
Double rubbishinoz!

It has been measured and verified by many FE'r. There isn't a difference in terms of changing the temperature between moonlight and sunlight. They are lights and have affect to the temperature. It is quite simple to get it.

I can not open youtube at the moment because your FET friends have made it forbid again. If you tell them open the youtube I can show you the evidences. Or I can show you the experiments at this night, if you prefer to wait.
No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!

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wise

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Triple incorrectinoz!
Double rubbishinoz!

It has been measured and verified by many FE'r. There isn't a difference in terms of changing the temperature between moonlight and sunlight. They are lights and have affect to the temperature. It is quite simple to get it.

I can not open youtube at the moment because your FET friends have made it forbid again. If you tell them open the youtube I can show you the evidences. Or I can show you the experiments at this night, if you prefer to wait.
No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!
Rubbishitinoz!

Some of these experiments were carried out outdoors, in a windless environment, under and over an open table from its four side.

As an alternative experiment I even saw that a measurement was made under the glass table and under a wooden table next to it. How can you deny this exact proof now? With creating more lies and excuses? Even your existance is an exact proof that the east must be flat, have to be flat; just because you are here. You're here just to force me to think like you. Then "everything was luck". yeah yeah!


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JJA

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Triple incorrectinoz!
Double rubbishinoz!

It has been measured and verified by many FE'r. There isn't a difference in terms of changing the temperature between moonlight and sunlight. They are lights and have affect to the temperature. It is quite simple to get it.

I can not open youtube at the moment because your FET friends have made it forbid again. If you tell them open the youtube I can show you the evidences. Or I can show you the experiments at this night, if you prefer to wait.
No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!
Rubbishitinoz!

Some of these experiments were carried out outdoors, in a windless environment, under and over an open table from its four side.

Something like a four sided cube?  Hmmm, heard that before somewhere.

The moon doesn't produce cold rays.  That would go against all the laws of thermodynamics.

Heat is transferred in several ways.  Conduction, convection and radiation. Of course if you measure in the sunlight vs the shade it's different. Why does this confuse you so much?

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rabinoz

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No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!
Rubbishitinoz!

Some of these experiments were carried out outdoors, in a windless environment, under and over an open table from its four side.

As an alternative experiment I even saw that a measurement was made under the glass table and under a wooden table next to it. How can you deny this exact proof now? With creating more lies and excuses? Even your existance is an exact proof that the east must be flat, have to be flat; just because you are here. You're here just to force me to think like you. Then "everything was luck". yeah yeah!
But, Mr Wise, on a clear night through sky overhead is fast colder that any shade from buildings. I have measured that many times.

Here are the genuine results of one set:


I took two containers filled with water and placed one in a location shaded from the sky (under a verandah roof or under a shrub, it made little difference).
The sky temperature was measured with an IR thermometer directed as near as possible vertical but well away from any overhead objects and the sun (in daylight).
Here are a few of my results - with no moon in the sky.[/size]
Date and Time
   
Sky Temp
   
Shade Temp
   
Exposed Temp
Aug 10 06:40
   
   
   
7.1C   
   
3.2C   
09:00
   
-21C   
   
11.1C   
   
7.3C   
16:00
   
-20C   
   
17.8C   
   
16.5C   
19:45
   
-24C   
   
12.0C   
   
10.3C   
Aug 11 07:00
   
-21C   
   
8.4C   
   
5.7C   
Bright Sun: 11:35
   
-16C   
   
20.2C   
   
34.2C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 12 06:40
   
-18C   
   
10.2C   
   
6.82C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 13 07:00
   
-40C   
   
1.5C   
   
-3.0C   

The temperature of that one in the bright sun kept rising.

There is no need for any moon in the sky. The moon does not send out "rays".
Moonlight travels in all directions and has an extremely small heating effect - maybe (50/500,000)C and virtually impossible to measure.
The temperature of an object is due to an equilibrium between heat lost to the environment and heat gained.
The sky, day or night, is very cold and very little heat is gained from that source but shading objects are usually at about the air temperature and far warmer than the sky.


Take it or leave it but those are the true results of measurements I have done personally.

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wise

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No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!
Rubbishitinoz!

Some of these experiments were carried out outdoors, in a windless environment, under and over an open table from its four side.

As an alternative experiment I even saw that a measurement was made under the glass table and under a wooden table next to it. How can you deny this exact proof now? With creating more lies and excuses? Even your existance is an exact proof that the east must be flat, have to be flat; just because you are here. You're here just to force me to think like you. Then "everything was luck". yeah yeah!
But, Mr Wise, on a clear night through sky overhead is fast colder that any shade from buildings. I have measured that many times.

Here are the genuine results of one set:


I took two containers filled with water and placed one in a location shaded from the sky (under a verandah roof or under a shrub, it made little difference).
The sky temperature was measured with an IR thermometer directed as near as possible vertical but well away from any overhead objects and the sun (in daylight).
Here are a few of my results - with no moon in the sky.[/size]
Date and Time
   
Sky Temp
   
Shade Temp
   
Exposed Temp
Aug 10 06:40
   
   
   
7.1C   
   
3.2C   
09:00
   
-21C   
   
11.1C   
   
7.3C   
16:00
   
-20C   
   
17.8C   
   
16.5C   
19:45
   
-24C   
   
12.0C   
   
10.3C   
Aug 11 07:00
   
-21C   
   
8.4C   
   
5.7C   
Bright Sun: 11:35
   
-16C   
   
20.2C   
   
34.2C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 12 06:40
   
-18C   
   
10.2C   
   
6.82C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 13 07:00
   
-40C   
   
1.5C   
   
-3.0C   

The temperature of that one in the bright sun kept rising.

There is no need for any moon in the sky. The moon does not send out "rays".
Moonlight travels in all directions and has an extremely small heating effect - maybe (50/500,000)C and virtually impossible to measure.
The temperature of an object is due to an equilibrium between heat lost to the environment and heat gained.
The sky, day or night, is very cold and very little heat is gained from that source but shading objects are usually at about the air temperature and far warmer than the sky.


Take it or leave it but those are the true results of measurements I have done personally.
Rubbish!

On the one hand, you are claiming moon has not a cooling effect. On the other hand, you are doing an experiment completely in a weather moon is not exist. However, although you have not considered the moon affect in your experiment, you have magically make a conclusion moon can not affect noticeably the temperature. How is it possible? How can you talk about something as a result of an experiment that you have not considered it as a factor!

Double rubbish!

1- Put your hand behind your head, think your mistakes, and do it again. 2-Do it again, again and again, till you find the difference with/without moon as 2-3 degrees. 3- If you can't, return the step 1.

Bye bye zonibar.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2020, 02:04:08 PM by wise »


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JJA

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On the one hand, you are claiming moon has not a cooling effect. On the other hand, you are doing an experiment completely in a weather moon is not exist. However, although you have not considered the moon affect in your experiment, you have magically make a conclusion moon can not affect noticeably the temperature. How is it possible? How can you talk about something as a result of an experiment that you have not considered it as a factor!

Double rubbish!

Moon magic indeed, tripple rubbish.

The moon doesn't cast cooling rays, death beams or anything else of that sort.  It's reflected light, which is energy.  That heats objects, if you understand what energy is.

So if I point my telescope at Moon will my Eye freese for tens of degrees since it is focused Moonlingt?

There are other explenations for "cold" under shadows when moon is under sky. Do same experiment with Moon and without Moon.

Also, whoudnt astronomers study this subject since it is noticable :D


  ;D And my when i open my frigde it emits cold light ;D

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rabinoz

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No! There is no "cold" from the Moon but the clear sky is what is cold. If you don't believe that, tough! It's not my problem. Bye!
Rubbishitinoz!

Some of these experiments were carried out outdoors, in a windless environment, under and over an open table from its four side.

As an alternative experiment I even saw that a measurement was made under the glass table and under a wooden table next to it. How can you deny this exact proof now? With creating more lies and excuses? Even your existance is an exact proof that the east must be flat, have to be flat; just because you are here. You're here just to force me to think like you. Then "everything was luck". yeah yeah!
But, Mr Wise, on a clear night through sky overhead is fast colder that any shade from buildings. I have measured that many times.

Here are the genuine results of one set:

I took two containers filled with water and placed one in a location shaded from the sky (under a verandah roof or under a shrub, it made little difference).
The sky temperature was measured with an IR thermometer directed as near as possible vertical but well away from any overhead objects and the sun (in daylight).
Here are a few of my results - with no moon in the sky.[/size]
Date and Time
   
Sky Temp
   
Shade Temp
   
Exposed Temp
Aug 10 06:40
   
   
   
7.1C   
   
3.2C   
09:00
   
-21C   
   
11.1C   
   
7.3C   
16:00
   
-20C   
   
17.8C   
   
16.5C   
19:45
   
-24C   
   
12.0C   
   
10.3C   
Aug 11 07:00
   
-21C   
   
8.4C   
   
5.7C   
Bright Sun: 11:35
   
-16C   
   
20.2C   
   
34.2C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 12 06:40
   
-18C   
   
10.2C   
   
6.82C   
After dawn, still in shade: Aug 13 07:00
   
-40C   
   
1.5C   
   
-3.0C   

The temperature of that one in the bright sun kept rising.

There is no need for any moon in the sky. The moon does not send out "rays".
Moonlight travels in all directions and has an extremely small heating effect - maybe (50/500,000)C and virtually impossible to measure.
The temperature of an object is due to an equilibrium between heat lost to the environment and heat gained.
The sky, day or night, is very cold and very little heat is gained from that source but shading objects are usually at about the air temperature and far warmer than the sky.


Take it or leave it but those are the true results of measurements I have done personally.
Rubbish!

On the one hand, you are claiming moon has not a cooling effect. On the other hand, you are doing an experiment completely in a weather moon is not exist. However, although you have not considered the moon affect in your experiment, you have magically make a conclusion moon can not affect noticeably the temperature. How is it possible? How can you talk about something as a result of an experiment that you have not considered it as a factor!

Double rubbish!

1- Put your hand behind your head, think your mistakes, and do it again. 2-Do it again, again and again, till you find the difference with/without moon as 2-3 degrees. 3- If you can't, return the step 1.

Bye bye zonibar.
I've pointed the IR thermometer directly at the moon and it makes absolutely no difference.
This is because even my IR thermometer has a reception angle of 12 and the Moon is only about 0.5 wide.

But astronomers have focused the Moon's image onto a thermocouple or other device and at full moon the surface of the moon is quite high.

The Moon certainly does not "radiate cold light"! There is no such thing.

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wise

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I've pointed the IR thermometer directly at the moon and it makes absolutely no difference.
This is because even my IR thermometer has a reception angle of 12 and the Moon is only about 0.5 wide.
You have debunked yourself! Haha!


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wise

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So if I point my telescope at Moon will my Eye freese for tens of degrees since it is focused Moonlingt?

There are other explenations for "cold" under shadows when moon is under sky. Do same experiment with Moon and without Moon.

Also, whoudnt astronomers study this subject since it is noticable :D

  ;D And my when i open my frigde it emits cold light ;D
It acts up to 2 degrees. I don't think this is observationally disturbing.


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So if I point my telescope at Moon will my Eye freese for tens of degrees since it is focused Moonlingt?

There are other explenations for "cold" under shadows when moon is under sky. Do same experiment with Moon and without Moon.

Also, whoudnt astronomers study this subject since it is noticable :D

  ;D And my when i open my frigde it emits cold light ;D
It acts up to 2 degrees. I don't think this is observationally disturbing.

Yes, but it is focused. I have seen people claiming moonlight under lens cools more

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wise

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So if I point my telescope at Moon will my Eye freese for tens of degrees since it is focused Moonlingt?

There are other explenations for "cold" under shadows when moon is under sky. Do same experiment with Moon and without Moon.

Also, whoudnt astronomers study this subject since it is noticable :D

  ;D And my when i open my frigde it emits cold light ;D
It acts up to 2 degrees. I don't think this is observationally disturbing.

Yes, but it is focused. I have seen people claiming moonlight under lens cools more
We cannot be sure without trying.


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JJA

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So if I point my telescope at Moon will my Eye freese for tens of degrees since it is focused Moonlingt?

There are other explenations for "cold" under shadows when moon is under sky. Do same experiment with Moon and without Moon.

Also, whoudnt astronomers study this subject since it is noticable :D

  ;D And my when i open my frigde it emits cold light ;D
It acts up to 2 degrees. I don't think this is observationally disturbing.

Yes, but it is focused. I have seen people claiming moonlight under lens cools more
We cannot be sure without trying.

Yeah, we can be sure.  There a lot of enormous telescopes with temperature controlled sensors that would certainly have noticed a cooling effect when pointed at the Moon.

Magic cold Moon rays, seriously.