Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2020, 04:40:11 AM »
Why swing a pendulum at all. It stinks of pretence.

How else do you impart a large amount of inertia?  Ever see the bicycle wheel on a rope demonstration? Or play with a gyroscope?  How would those things work if they didn't move?

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2020, 10:11:05 AM »
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No it doesn't help. Just what do you mean?
The only place the Earth's gravity comes into it is in providing the restoring force to make the pendulum swing
A spring pulling down could provide that.

I would suggest watching the following. Please!
https://english.alarabiya.net/en/variety/2015/02/16/Saudi-cleric-Sun-revolves-around-stationary-Earth

Foucault and his believers are thinking just like the aforementioned Saudi cleric - Right

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2020, 11:14:46 AM »
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This is easy to understand.

Imagine taking one of those huge pendulums and putting it on a giant turntable.  Now, slowly turn it, taking an entire day to do so.  What will happen? Will the weight at the bottom move with the table?  Of course it will.

Turntable acts like a cantilever beam. The major parts of interest of the turntable are the central column and top. The weight of the bob is transferred to the top surface of the table. The combined weight of the bob and the top surface of the table  is transferred to the central column. The combined weight of the central column, the top surface, and the bob are then transferred to the ground.

let placed a bob on top of the table but near the edge. it doesn't matter whether the table is stationary or revolving; the weight of the bob doesn't transfer directly to the ground but via aforesaid techniques. 

Addendum: its quite clear but still for those who have not yet applied above-said weight transfer techniques [ or simply weight transfer in frame structure] to Foucault's Pendulum.

The weight of bob of Foucault's Pendulum = mg where m = mass of the bob. Tention in wire = T=mg this T (=mg) is taken by the dome. The combined weight of the T=mg and the dome is transferred to the slab. 

I don't know about the bones/ structure of the building where Foucault's Pendulum is suspended but the weight of the slab and the weight taken by the slab is transferred to girders or beams. Usually, columns take the load from beams instead of the walls, and then finally the total weight of the building and Foucault's Pendulum are transferred to the ground via foundation either shallow or deep. 

Conclusion: the swing of the bob of Foucault's Pendulum has nothing to do with the rotation of the earth.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2020, 01:50:58 PM by E E K »

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2020, 11:35:00 AM »
Why swing a pendulum at all. It stinks of pretence.

How else do you impart a large amount of inertia?  Ever see the bicycle wheel on a rope demonstration? Or play with a gyroscope?  How would those things work if they didn't move?

Normally I’d say the best way to think about it is to compare to a spacecraft away from any gravitational fields.

Fire the main engine then shut it off.  The spacecraft just moves under its own linear momentum.  Now apply a rotation with RCS thrusters or whatever.  You’ve introduced a spin, but it doesn’t change the linear momentum of the craft. They are independent.

Normally that is. 

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2020, 01:51:45 PM »
Addendum: its quite clear but still for those who have not yet applied above-said weight transfer techniques [ or simply weight transfer in frame structure] to Foucault's Pendulum.

The weight of bob of Foucault's Pendulum = mg where m = mass of the bob. Tention in wire = T=mg this T (=mg) is taken by the dome. The combined weight of the T=mg and the dome is transferred to the slab.

I don't know about the bones/ structure of the building where Foucault's Pendulum is suspended but the weight of the slab and the weight taken by the slab is transferred to girders or beams. Usually, columns take the load from beams instead of the walls, and then finally the total weight of the building and Foucault's Pendulum are transferred to the ground via foundation either shallow or deep.

Conclusion: the swing of the bob of Foucault's Pendulum has nothing to do with the rotation of the earth.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2020, 02:15:06 PM »
None of that matters.  It’s all about the motion.

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2020, 02:54:40 PM »
Addendum: its quite clear but still for those who have not yet applied above-said weight transfer techniques [ or simply weight transfer in frame structure] to Foucault's Pendulum.

The weight of bob of Foucault's Pendulum = mg where m = mass of the bob. Tention in wire = T=mg this T (=mg) is taken by the dome. The combined weight of the T=mg and the dome is transferred to the slab.

I don't know about the bones/ structure of the building where Foucault's Pendulum is suspended but the weight of the slab and the weight taken by the slab is transferred to girders or beams. Usually, columns take the load from beams instead of the walls, and then finally the total weight of the building and Foucault's Pendulum are transferred to the ground via foundation either shallow or deep.

Conclusion: the swing of the bob of Foucault's Pendulum has nothing to do with the rotation of the earth.

You are discussing loads and weight and tension when the pendulum is all about kinetic energy in the swing. They have nothing at all to do with each other.

Conclusion: You are not understanding physics.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2020, 11:25:12 PM »
Why swing a pendulum at all. It stinks of pretence.

How else do you impart a large amount of inertia?  Ever see the bicycle wheel on a rope demonstration? Or play with a gyroscope?  How would those things work if they didn't move?
They work by resisting atmospheric pressure and crating pressure variations, just like the swinging pendulum does.
Because we live in a atmospheric cyclone ranging in super strength to the centre to mild (to us) from our existing point, a swinging weighted pendulum would definitely alter in movement.
The pendulum would actually be more of a proof of a stationary Earth with moving pressure. created by the displacement of atmosphere by the dense movement of the ball, through it....and compressing it each time, which is compressed back onto.


Foucault's pendulum proves opposite to what's told, in my opinion.

This is why having it stood still and having a table on a bearing instead is argued against, because the table would obviously not move and neither would the pendulum.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #38 on: June 16, 2020, 05:20:51 AM »
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You are discussing loads and weight and tension when the pendulum is all about kinetic energy in the swing. They have nothing at all to do with each other.

Can the pendulum of the subject gain motion without its weight (mg)?

Doesn’t the weight of the pendulum transfer to the ground at one POINT if it is attached to the L-shaped pole / or the same points in case of the building as explained above?

Doesn’t the said POINT, which is attached firmly to the earth, rotate along with the rotation of the earth and ultimately the pendulum with or w/o swinging or the vertical plane in which it lies?

As asked earlier I want to know more about the mechanism at a point where the wire is attached to the dome of the building. No idea how does dome rotate in the animation while the wire and bob don’t get along with revolving of the earth? TY

The pendulum must be detached from the gravitational field while observing the rotation of the earth. 

The weight of the rotating platform in the following along with anything on it is transferred to one point as explained. There two types of gravitational force



1-   b/t the ball in air and turntable  AND
2-   b/t  earth and ball in the air
Since 1 <<<<<< 2, therefore, ball in the air follow the g of the earth not the g of the turntable. The ball in the air makes a curve on the turntable but actually it rotates along with the rotation of the earth.  The moving plane in the air is similar to a ball in the air in the above video.

Why would a sniper adjust for the Coriolis effect in the absence of a rotating platform @ 2:44 in the following when he/she and the target are spinning along with earth?
« Last Edit: June 16, 2020, 05:59:58 AM by E E K »

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #39 on: June 16, 2020, 08:06:40 AM »
Why would a sniper adjust for the Coriolis effect in the absence of a rotating platform @ 2:44 in the following when he/she and the target are spinning along with earth?


Well this one is super easy to explain, barely an inconvenience.

The sniper and target are attached to the Earth and moving with it.

The bullet is NOT attached to the Earth, and is affected by the Coriolis effect.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2020, 08:35:34 AM by JJA »

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #40 on: June 16, 2020, 08:30:26 AM »

Well this one is super easy to explain, hardly an inconvenience.

Do you mean barely an inconvenience?


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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #41 on: June 16, 2020, 08:35:20 AM »

Well this one is super easy to explain, hardly an inconvenience.

Do you mean barely an inconvenience?

I did mean that.  I am a terrible person, and feel quite stupid now for misquoting. I'll fix it right away, nobody will ever know.

At least I got the Coriolis effect question right. Although I didn't mention that the bullet is still somewhat attached to the Earths rotation via atmospheric drag, but that's minimal in this case.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #42 on: June 16, 2020, 08:44:03 AM »

Well this one is super easy to explain, hardly an inconvenience.

Do you mean barely an inconvenience?

I did mean that.  I am a terrible person, and feel quite stupid now for misquoting. I'll fix it right away, nobody will ever know.

At least I got the Coriolis effect question right. Although I didn't mention that the bullet is still somewhat attached to the Earths rotation via atmospheric drag, but that's minimal in this case.

I’m just happy I’m not the only one who finds it vastly amusing.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2020, 09:25:10 AM »
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You are discussing loads and weight and tension when the pendulum is all about kinetic energy in the swing. They have nothing at all to do with each other.

Can the pendulum of the subject gain motion without its weight (mg)?

No.  But the direction of that motion comes entirely from the angle of the weight relative to the fixing when you first release it (if you were careful enough).

Once it starts swinging it should  just oscillate in that line without changing direction.  Gravity just pulls down, so as the weight passes the center it will slow down and then swing back along the same path.

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Doesn’t the weight of the pendulum transfer to the ground at one POINT if it is attached to the L-shaped pole / or the same points in case of the building as explained above?

Of course.

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Doesn’t the said POINT, which is attached firmly to the earth, rotate along with the rotation of the earth and ultimately the pendulum with or w/o swinging or the vertical plane in which it lies?

Yes.  The fixing point rotates with the earth, therefore the wire rotates with the earth, therefore the body of the pendulum rotates with the earth. 

But the direction of the swing doesn’t.

If something has linear momentum and you give it a spin, the direction of its momentum doesn’t change.  See my spaceship example above.

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As asked earlier I want to know more about the mechanism at a point where the wire is attached to the dome of the building. No idea how does dome rotate in the animation while the wire and bob don’t get along with revolving of the earth? TY

Then you are looking in the wrong place.

If you want you know how it works, we’re trying to tell you.


Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2020, 10:20:46 AM »
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But the direction of the swing doesn’t.
-How?
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If you want you know how it works, we’re trying to tell you
- Yes, please!

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If something has linear momentum and you give it a spin, the direction of its momentum doesn’t change.  See my spaceship example above.
- Understood but how does it work in the experiment of Foucault's pendulum?

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2020, 11:21:00 AM »
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The sniper and target are attached to the Earth and moving with it.

The bullet is NOT attached to the Earth, and is affected by the Coriolis effect.
Do airplanes also affect by the Coriolis effect?

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #46 on: June 16, 2020, 11:27:36 AM »
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But the direction of the swing doesn’t.
-How?
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If you want you know how it works, we’re trying to tell you
- Yes, please!

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If something has linear momentum and you give it a spin, the direction of its momentum doesn’t change.  See my spaceship example above.
- Understood but how does it work in the experiment of Foucault's pendulum?

The exact same way.  It takes a force to change an objects momentum.  A pendulum swinging back and forth has momentum in the direction of the swing.

Imagine you want to make the 950 pound weight swing in a different direction?  First you have to catch it, which is going to take an enormous amount of work, imagine just standing in front of that thing and trying to stop it!  It would send you flying.  Then you have to pull it in a new direction and set it in motion, again a lot of work.

So all that work to change it's direction is what keeps it swinging back and forth as the Earth rotates under it. It takes a massive amount of force applied to it to change it's direction, so it stays swinging in place as the Earth moves.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2020, 03:20:50 AM »
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Fire the main engine then shut it off.  The spacecraft just moves under its own linear momentum.  Now apply a rotation with RCS thrusters or whatever.  You’ve introduced a spin, but it doesn’t change the linear momentum of the craft. They are independent.
what if the said craft orbits the celestial body? like the earth orbits around the sun
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The exact same way.  It takes a force to change an objects momentum.  A pendulum swinging back and forth has momentum in the direction of the swing.

Pendulum rotates along with the rotation of the earth. It also revolves around the sun as it attached to the earth. its about the rotating frame. Would the said pendulum work if tried in merry go round?

According to you, the vertical plane remains fixed relative to the rotation of earth but changes its side relative to the sun when the earth moves to on the opposite side in its orbit around the sun. i.e bob changes its faces from west to east if faces west initially. 

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #48 on: June 17, 2020, 03:39:14 AM »
Quote from: JJA
The exact same way.  It takes a force to change an objects momentum.  A pendulum swinging back and forth has momentum in the direction of the swing.

Pendulum rotates along with the rotation of the earth. It also revolves around the sun as it attached to the earth. its about the rotating frame. Would the said pendulum work if tried in merry go round?

According to you, the vertical plane remains fixed relative to the rotation of earth but changes its side relative to the sun when the earth moves to on the opposite side in its orbit around the sun. i.e bob changes its faces from west to east if faces west initially.

I'm not sure who you are replying to about the Sun, I never mentioned the Sun and it has nothing to do with the Foucault's Pendulum.

Would the said pendulum work if tried in merry go round?

Yes, it would absolutely work the same on a merry go round.

Lets assume we are on a flat, non rotating Earth.

Not take a merry go round, clear off all the horses and set up a large pendulum on it.  Start the pendulum swinging.  Now start up the merry go round, but remember it is going to be going slowly, it's only going to go around once every 24 hours.

The pendulum is not going to follow the merry go round, it will continue to swing in the same direction.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2020, 08:05:45 AM »

Not take a merry go round, clear off all the horses and set up a large pendulum on it.  Start the pendulum swinging.  Now start up the merry go round, but remember it is going to be going slowly, it's only going to go around once every 24 hours.

The pendulum is not going to follow the merry go round, it will continue to swing in the same direction.

No need to go that slowly.  Should be much easier to demonstrate if not.

Take a weight and a piece of string, go to local children’s playground (although they may currently be shut).  Give the thing a spin, sit in the middle and swing the pendulum.


Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #50 on: June 18, 2020, 01:11:28 AM »
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Yes, it would absolutely work the same on a merry go round.

Lets assume we are on a flat, non rotating Earth. 

Not take a merry go round, clear off all the horses and set up a large pendulum on it.  Start the pendulum swinging.  Now start up the merry go round, but remember it is going to be going slowly, it's only going to go around once every 24 hours.

The weight of the pendulum and its to and fro motion is not going to follow the merry go round, it will continue to swing in the same direction.
But again the bob is connected to the earth gravitationally, not merry go round as compared o earth as explained in reply #38.

Question: Earth rotates from East to West. If the Coriolis effect is true then would the whole mass of water/liquid in a container (including water bodies) on the equator either at a small or large scale push to the east side if yes any reference. It means the shores are not leveled. Reasons if no? TY, please!
« Last Edit: June 18, 2020, 02:10:38 AM by E E K »

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #51 on: June 18, 2020, 04:27:03 AM »
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Yes, it would absolutely work the same on a merry go round.

Lets assume we are on a flat, non rotating Earth. 

Not take a merry go round, clear off all the horses and set up a large pendulum on it.  Start the pendulum swinging.  Now start up the merry go round, but remember it is going to be going slowly, it's only going to go around once every 24 hours.

The weight of the pendulum and its to and fro motion is not going to follow the merry go round, it will continue to swing in the same direction.
But again the bob is connected to the earth gravitationally, not merry go round as compared o earth as explained in reply #38.

The bob is attracted to the earth but isn't connected.  This isn't hard to understand.

Take something heavy, tie a rope to it and swing it, then turn the support.  The direction of the swing oesn't change.

I just tried this myself with a 2 liter soda bottle.

These are things you can do yourself.  Find a playground as another said and do an actual, real experiment to show it. Showing that a pendulum will keep swinging int he same direction unless forced to change is an extremely simple, and basic experiment, and should be very easy to understand. It's basic momentum.

Question: Earth rotates from East to West. If the Coriolis effect is true then would the whole mass of water/liquid in a container (including water bodies) on the equator either at a small or large scale push to the east side if yes any reference. It means the shores are not leveled. Reasons if no? TY, please!

The spinning Earth does cause water to be higher at the equator, and makes the seas not all at the same level.

Earth Ocean Bulge

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rabinoz

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #52 on: June 18, 2020, 04:31:44 AM »
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Yes, it would absolutely work the same on a merry go round.

Lets assume we are on a flat, non rotating Earth. 

Not take a merry go round, clear off all the horses and set up a large pendulum on it.  Start the pendulum swinging.  Now start up the merry go round, but remember it is going to be going slowly, it's only going to go around once every 24 hours.

The weight of the pendulum and its to and fro motion is not going to follow the merry go round, it will continue to swing in the same direction.
But again the bob is connected to the earth gravitationally, not merry go round as compared o earth as explained in reply #38.

Question: Earth rotates from East to West. If the Coriolis effect is true
The Coriolis force is certainly true but also very small!
Just consider that anyone can observe the four distinct situations observed for High and Low-Pressure Weather systems in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

These include the intense low pressure systems,  Hurricanes, Typhoons and Cyclones. These four distinct situations observed are:
     
Northern Hemisphere
     
Southern Hemisphere
Rotation direction of Highs
     
Clockwise
     
Anti-clockwise
Rotation direction of Lows
     
Anti-clockwise
     
Clockwise
Just look at weather maps that show highs, lows and wind directions to verify this for yourself.

Explain that without the Coriolis effect!

Quote from: E E K
then would the whole mass of water/liquid in a container (including water bodies) on the equator either at a small or large scale push to the east side if yes any reference. It means the shores are not leveled. Reasons if no? TY, please!
Why should the shores be levelled? The Coriolis force on moving air or water is very slight,
Have you ever calculated the actual Coriolis force on moving water?

I don't know it this will help or hinder: The Coriolis Effect by Dave Van Domelen.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #53 on: June 18, 2020, 05:13:26 AM »
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I just tried this myself with a 2 liter soda bottle.
I understand what you say but I have a disagreement over the rotating frame, which is attached to another rotating frame (earth). 

Similarly, a container could be a cup of tea or a big ocean. Fill a small circular container (big enough for the observation) with water till it spills over the brim.  Place it on a level surface on the equator line of earth before filling.

The water level must disturb in the container after 24 hours or more if Coriolis effect is true but I believe it will be the same. No spill at all on the east brim.

Moreover, earth has an angular momentum in its orbit around the sun besides spinning about its own axis. Doesn’t gravity of moon bulge the oceans during tides and the speed of earth changes in its orbit?

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #54 on: June 18, 2020, 05:21:56 AM »
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I just tried this myself with a 2 liter soda bottle.
I understand what you say but I have a disagreement over the rotating frame, which is attached to another rotating frame (earth). 

Similarly, a container could be a cup of tea or a big ocean. Fill a small circular container (big enough for the observation) with water till it spills over the brim.  Place it on a level surface on the equator line of earth before filling.

The water level must disturb in the container after 24 hours or more if Coriolis effect is true but I believe it will be the same. No spill at all on the east brim.

This is a question of scale.  Remember, the Earth only spins once every 24 hours.  That is a very, very, very small effect.  You are not going to see water in a cup spin.

Again, think of a merry go round that turns once every 24 hours.  Are you going to see a cup of water swirling around or sloshing out? No. The motion is far to slow to cause that. You could hardly even perceive the motion, let alone see water spilling from the cup.

The Earth is HUGE.  8,000 miles across. Turning once a day. At this scale, puny humans don't have the ability to see immediately and directly any of these effects.

But we can see them over time, like with Foucault's Pendulum.

Moreover, earth has an angular momentum in its orbit around the sun besides spinning about its own axis. Doesn’t gravity of moon bulge the oceans during tides and the speed of earth changes in its orbit?

Yes, the Moon causes the oceans to bulge and causes tides.

No, changes in the Earth's orbital speed don't affect us. Earth is in free-fall in relation to the Sun and isn't affected in any measurable way by changes in seasonal orbital speeds.


Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #55 on: June 18, 2020, 07:11:17 AM »
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This is a question of scale.  Remember, the Earth only spins once every 24 hours.  That is a very, very, very small effect.  You are not going to see water in a cup spin.
We are observing the motion of the mass of water as a whole from west to east, not spin. Water/ liquid has no definite shape and takes a shape set down by its container and the rotation of the earth from west to east. This means shifting of the water will be more in the upper portion as compared to the lower portion in a container and ultimately spill over east brim.   

In simple words: SWAY in the mass of water as a whole from west to east.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2020, 08:06:48 AM by E E K »

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #56 on: June 18, 2020, 09:00:55 AM »
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This is a question of scale.  Remember, the Earth only spins once every 24 hours.  That is a very, very, very small effect.  You are not going to see water in a cup spin.
We are observing the motion of the mass of water as a whole from west to east, not spin. Water/ liquid has no definite shape and takes a shape set down by its container and the rotation of the earth from west to east. This means shifting of the water will be more in the upper portion as compared to the lower portion in a container and ultimately spill over east brim.   

In simple words: SWAY in the mass of water as a whole from west to east.

You have some good ideas for tests here but are missing a few details.

The Earth does rotate west to east, but the water isn't going to shift to the east. If you are on the equator where the rotation is strongest, the rotation will cause it to shift UP.

Think of a merry go round again.  If you put a glass of water on it, which way is a full glass of water going to start to flow over?  It's going to flow out, away from the merry go round.

Now if you suddenly sped up or slowed down the Earth then yes, water would flow to the east or west. But the Earth rotates at a steady rate, so any movement of the water will be thrown away from the planet.

But again, remember that the rotation is only once every 24 hours.  That glass of water on a merry go round that only turns once a day isn't going to have any noticeable spilling at that slow of a rate.

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #57 on: June 18, 2020, 09:31:14 AM »
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only once every 24 hours
rotation is non-stop therefore time is not a factor. It can be observed for many many years if possible. It will show a noticeable rise/ spill at the east of container one day

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JJA

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Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #58 on: June 18, 2020, 11:11:48 AM »
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only once every 24 hours
rotation is non-stop therefore time is not a factor. It can be observed for many many years if possible. It will show a noticeable rise/ spill at the east of container one day

"Once every 24 hours" is a unit of speed, not time.  I was pointing out how SLOW the rotation was.  If a rotation is slow, the effect is small, and rotating at 0.0007 RPM is very very very very slow.

A glass of water on a platform rotating at 0.0007 RPM simply isn't going to show a visible effect. 

You can try this at home.  Here is something that runs at 1 RPM, a thousand times faster than the Earth, you can put a cup of water on there and see if you can spot any spilling of the water. Then remember the Earth is a thousand times slower.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0756ZQX42/

Re: Question about the Foucault's Pendulum?
« Reply #59 on: June 18, 2020, 11:59:17 AM »
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only once every 24 hours
rotation is non-stop therefore time is not a factor. It can be observed for many many years if possible. It will show a noticeable rise/ spill at the east of container one day

"Once every 24 hours" is a unit of speed, not time.  I was pointing out how SLOW the rotation was.  If a rotation is slow, the effect is small, and rotating at 0.0007 RPM is very very very very slow.

A glass of water on a platform rotating at 0.0007 RPM simply isn't going to show a visible effect. 

You can try this at home.  Here is something that runs at 1 RPM, a thousand times faster than the Earth, you can put a cup of water on there and see if you can spot any spilling of the water. Then remember the Earth is a thousand times slower.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0756ZQX42/
460 meters per second or roughly 1,000 miles per hour is not enough to show leaning in the aforementioned water or any water bodies.