Sea and air pressure

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #60 on: June 04, 2020, 11:16:58 PM »
Quote from: JackBlack
Perhaps more importantly, HOW are you pushing into that stacked height, when you have nothing other than air directly below you?
Your very own dense mass you are made up of is pushing into that stack above and around you.
And you do not have much air directly below you. You have very little below your feet, which is what counts. Just your feet as you stand, unless you change your stance.
Quote from: JackBlack
What are you pushing off, the air in the stack below?
The solid ground.


Quote from: JackBlack
Does that mean all your appeals to "your feet on the deck" were completely wrong?
Nope, it means you seem to want to refuse to understand what I'm saying. It's pretty clear.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #61 on: June 04, 2020, 11:25:50 PM »
Quote from: JackBlack
It all cancels out, even when subjected to extreme low pressure, because scales would be subjected to the same resistant force, or lack of, to measure.
Scales are not the only way to measure it. We can also directly observe the object falling.
Of course you can observe a mass falling, but what are you measuring?
All you see is a mass of which you cannot determine as to what this mass is in make up nor numbered measurement.


Quote from: JackBlack
But even using scales is fine. That is because scales are not magically balanced with the atmosphere.
No magic involved.


Quote from: JackBlack
They do not use the atmosphere to measure.
They use the mass of any object against the atmospheric pressure to measure. That's the key.




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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #62 on: June 04, 2020, 11:36:15 PM »
Quote from: JackBlack
Porosity of any dense mass in a lower pressure will change volume to suit the surrounding.
This is why there would be minimal, if any change.
Externally there would be minimal change in terms of using an evacuation chamber and external scales.
So now you are saying it isn't the spring, instead the object itself magically changes volume to maintain basically the same weight?
It's a mixture of everything that is part of the atmosphere.
Just like a barometer will work by atmospheric pressure pushing the mercury or releasing that push.


Quote from: JackBlack
And what magic causes that and why is no change in the volume visible?
There is a change of volume of an object. Some you can see and some you won't see.
A slightly inflated balloon placed inside a chamber with pressure evacuated will increase in visible volume whilst the chamber will reduce in visible volume being taken up by the increase in the balloon size.
It's an equalisation of pressure that goes from compressed air in  the external balloon to the release of the compressed air from the chamber with the balloon inside of it by now, in which the compressed air inside the balloon ios now decompressing because it is being allowed to by the evacuation of the compressed air inside the chamber by an external pump which pushes back the external atmosphere to allow this.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #63 on: June 04, 2020, 11:39:12 PM »
Quote from: JackBlack

Notice how you expect people to reject what is shown with actual evidence, while you provide wild speculation with no evidence at all in its place?
I'm not asking anyone to reject anything. You choose to do what you wish, as everyone can.
I'm simply telling it from my side and it's up to each individual to choose whether they want to try to understand it.

And as far as you mention you have actual evidence. What evidence do you have against what I'm arguing?

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JackBlack

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #64 on: June 05, 2020, 04:15:53 AM »
With your repition of the same statement, my post would be too long to address it all individually, so I will move them around to address them together, or skip over repeates.

It's like being in a swimming pool. You can stand next to the side but you're still surrounded by the exact same amount of water.
You mean like how I can have something pressed up against the side and not have any significant amount of water there?
I would say that goes directly against you claim.

Air will be under you but in tiny amounts under your feet inside more solid matter but it will be minimal compared to what's above you, directly because solid matter takes up much of the space you have underfoot.
Your feet are pushing against the deck
Above you, you push into the stacks by your own dense mass and what you push away is pushing right back at you as well as what is stacked above and around.
Your very own dense mass you are made up of is pushing into that stack above and around you.
And you do not have much air directly below you. You have very little below your feet, which is what counts.
NO!
They are not. That was extremely clear from the examples I gave.
The fact that you need to repeatedly appeal to your feet being pressed against an object below you shows you have no explanation at all.
You need to explain the situations I provided, not the strawmen you set up. That means your feet are not against the floor and there can be insigificant amounts of air to the side of you or above you (at least directly above), with you pushing either sideways or downwards into the air.

Repeatedly providing your straw-man does nothing to address these situations.

When you're in midair you have to have a force to keep you in midair
That necessity of a force is what you need to explain.
You need to provide a force to counter a force pushing/pulling you down.
The question is what is pushing you down in the first place?
If that didn't exist, then you would float and not need to provide any force to keep yourself up.

The roof has more mass of molecules under it
And why isn't that pushing you up, like the molecules of air above you push you down when you stand on the ground?

Quote from: JackBlack
Why is it magically always pushing down, even when you are against a wall or against the roof, or in mid air?
You can use your imagination to answer your questions.
Why don't you answer my questions?
I have already thought about it and come to the conclusion that these simple observations completely refute your model and show that air is not responsible for why objects fall.

You are pushing in all directions.
Which should therefore mean you aren't just pushing up into the air and thus the air shouldn't just be pushing you down.
Instead it should be pushing from all directions and thus does not explain why objects fall.

Nope, it means you seem to want to refuse to understand what I'm saying. It's pretty clear.
Again, I understand quite well.
You are outright rejecting reality and attempting to replace it with pure nonsense which does not withstand even extremely basic scrutiny.
Rather than even attempt to address the problem raised, you repeatedly deflect and try to explain a completely different scenario.

If I truly don't understand that means you really have no idea what you are talking about and don't even understand the difference between an object being on the floor and an object not being on the floor.

Of course you can observe a mass falling, but what are you measuring?
The rate of acceleration of the object, the ratio of the force to mass.

No magic involved.
You have no explanation at all, and it directly deifies the known laws of reality and simple observations. I would say that counts as magic.

Quote from: JackBlack
They use the mass of any object against the atmospheric pressure to measure. That's the key.
No, they use things like a spring to measure. No atmosphere involved.

Just like a barometer will work by atmospheric pressure pushing the mercury or releasing that push.
You mean a barometer which works by having the pressure in the column due to gravity being balanced by the pressure of the atmosphere?
You are yet to explain how a barometer works with your nonsense, and until you can explain the directionality, it is pointless to go down that path.

Some you can see and some you won't see.
A slightly inflated balloon placed inside a chamber with pressure evacuated will increase in visible volume
Yes, because you are lowering the pressure of the air. It is the air inside which is taking up more volume.
The material of the balloon stretches, becoming thinner.
But that all goes via quite well known laws regarding gases.
I am asking about a solid object.
Why do we never see it expand?

And if it does expand, doesn't that negate your whole idea of all objects being porous and having loads of air.

I'm simply telling it from my side
But only what you want to tell while repeatedly ignoring everything that shows you are wrong.

And as far as you mention you have actual evidence. What evidence do you have against what I'm arguing?
How about the examples I have provided in this thread which you are yet to explain?
Rather than attempting to explain these situations which are easily repeatable, you just repeatedly explain the same straw-man.

Again, 3 simple situations:
1 - An object is pressed against a wall, somewhere around the middle height of the wall.
2 - An object is pressed against the underside of some solid object.
3 - An object is is mid air.
(If you like, you can have a bonus one, 4 - An object is suspended from a spring balance).

In all three cases the object falls. (In the 4th, it's weight is measured.)
Yet your only explanation of why objects experience a downwards force (such as that required to accelerate them and make them fall) is because they are pushing against a deck up into the atmosphere which in turn pushes them back.
But in none of these cases are the objects any solid surface below them. In none of these cases are they pushing off the floor.

This shows your explanation is pure nonsense which does not describe reality at all.
This is evidence that has repeatedly been presented to you, which you have repeatedly ignored.

Again, if you want to have any hope of your model matching reality you need to explain the directionality in all of these cases.
What is abundantly clear is that it is not from there being a solid object below, and that it has nothing to do with what direction air is in.
As such, repeating your straw-man of pushing against the deck shows you have no explanation at all.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #65 on: June 05, 2020, 09:49:14 AM »

That necessity of a force is what you need to explain.
You need to provide a force to counter a force pushing/pulling you down.
The question is what is pushing you down in the first place?
If that didn't exist, then you would float and not need to provide any force to keep yourself up.
The force provided against atmosphere is the force of any mass pushing into it and compressing it by that mass, which immediately creates that reactionary pressure back onto that mass.
This is why a man made scale plate can be used to measure that mass by using numbers to create a man made weight of it.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #66 on: June 05, 2020, 09:52:54 AM »
Quote from: JackBlack

The roof has more mass of molecules under it
And why isn't that pushing you up, like the molecules of air above you push you down when you stand on the ground?
Because the roof is part of the structure in sections of the atmospheric stack and is using the dense ground as the resistance.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #67 on: June 05, 2020, 09:56:16 AM »
Quote from: JackBlack
Why don't you answer my questions?
I do.
You not liking the answers as answers, is not my issue.

Quote from: JackBlack
I have already thought about it and come to the conclusion that these simple observations completely refute your model and show that air is not responsible for why objects fall.
You're quite entitled to that but you still choose to debate it.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #68 on: June 05, 2020, 10:01:20 AM »
Quote from: JackBlack
You are pushing in all directions.
Which should therefore mean you aren't just pushing up into the air and thus the air shouldn't just be pushing you down.
Instead it should be pushing from all directions and thus does not explain why objects fall.
It is pushing in all directions but horizontally it's pushing/crushing you near equally, even if you stand against a wall or in a field (assuming perfect calmness (no wind).

However, above you you have the stacked atmosphere and your dense mass is pushing into that which crushes right back onto your head and shoulders with your feet (assuming upright stance) acting as the resistance to that push by using the ground, which is more dense.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #69 on: June 05, 2020, 10:04:07 AM »
Quote from: JackBlack
Of course you can observe a mass falling, but what are you measuring?
The rate of acceleration of the object, the ratio of the force to mass.
How..... without measuring the mass?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #70 on: June 05, 2020, 10:47:43 AM »
Quote from: JackBlack
Again, 3 simple situations:
1 - An object is pressed against a wall, somewhere around the middle height of the wall.
Pressed with what and raised with what?
Quote from: JackBlack
2 - An object is pressed against the underside of some solid object.
Again, pressed with what?
Quote from: JackBlack
3 - An object is is mid air.
What force keeps it in mid air?
Quote from: JackBlack
(If you like, you can have a bonus one, 4 - An object is suspended from a spring balance).

The object has to be lifted to be put on that spring balance, meaning it has to be pushed into the atmosphere at the point where it hangs and then that mass is displacing it's own mass of atmosphere which is pushing right back and only stopped from being pushed down by the strength of the spring.

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Stash

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #71 on: June 05, 2020, 01:11:59 PM »
Quote from: JackBlack
You are pushing in all directions.
Which should therefore mean you aren't just pushing up into the air and thus the air shouldn't just be pushing you down.
Instead it should be pushing from all directions and thus does not explain why objects fall.
It is pushing in all directions but horizontally it's pushing/crushing you near equally, even if you stand against a wall or in a field (assuming perfect calmness (no wind).

However, above you you have the stacked atmosphere and your dense mass is pushing into that which crushes right back onto your head and shoulders with your feet (assuming upright stance) acting as the resistance to that push by using the ground, which is more dense.

If I were to change my form would I feel less or more pressure pushing down on me?

For instance, if I outstretch my arms, would I feel more of the vertical downward pressure than if I stood with my arms at my sides? If I attached cardboard 'wings' to my outstretched arms, because of the now greater surface area, would I feel more vertical downward pressure?

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Macarios

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #72 on: June 05, 2020, 01:20:57 PM »
There is no vacuum in the scale.
The top is pressed by the air from up and from down equally.

If you put scale in a vacuum bag and start sucking air out of it then the more air you suck out,
the more of the atmospheric pressure gets canceled and the scale gets pressed harder.

You can try with "Spacesaver", "Vacwel" or similar bag and vacuum cleaner.

Find "Magdeburg Hemispheres" at YouTube and pay attention:
When the pressure inside is reduced enough and someone tries to separatethem, the hemispheres are held together by the atmosphetric pressure.
The atmospheric pressure that keeps them together holds them horizontaly, or in any other direction, not only vertically.
I don't have to fight about anything.
These things are not about me.
When one points facts out, they speak for themselves.
The main goal in all that is simplicity.

Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #73 on: June 05, 2020, 02:19:59 PM »
Two tidbits to point out:

1.
Pushing down vs pulling down.
If the stack above where to push down on someone (like a spring), their hair would be pushed flat to the "weight" of their entire body as the downward "push force" would start at dome-stack-hair-neck-body-feet-"scale"-ground.
There is no way hair gell companies would exist.
And most people would have much thicker necks.


2.
Lateral.
We live under a dome of frozen hydrogen and helium.
A dome, by definition will be a semi circular covering that extends from the ground up and over.
So if the air can stack vertically, it can stack horizontally.
Which it clearly doesnt since things dont fall sideways.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #74 on: June 06, 2020, 12:07:01 AM »
If I were to change my form would I feel less or more pressure pushing down on me?
For instance, if I outstretch my arms, would I feel more of the vertical downward pressure than if I stood with my arms at my sides?
You would transfer the pressure but the overall pressure upon your body would be the same.

Quote from: Stash
If I attached cardboard 'wings' to my outstretched arms, because of the now greater surface area, would I feel more vertical downward pressure?
Very slightly, you would feel that added pressure...and I mean very slightly due to the extra mass of the wings but also due to the massive porosity of them only leading to a small amount of extra mass pushing into the atmosphere.

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Stash

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #75 on: June 06, 2020, 12:13:37 AM »
If I were to change my form would I feel less or more pressure pushing down on me?
For instance, if I outstretch my arms, would I feel more of the vertical downward pressure than if I stood with my arms at my sides?
You would transfer the pressure but the overall pressure upon your body would be the same.

Quote from: Stash
If I attached cardboard 'wings' to my outstretched arms, because of the now greater surface area, would I feel more vertical downward pressure?
Very slightly, you would feel that added pressure...and I mean very slightly due to the extra mass of the wings but also due to the massive porosity of them only leading to a small amount of extra mass pushing into the atmosphere.

Why only slightly? Iíve now made my footprint, as it were, larger, more surface area, without really increasing my mass. According to your theory, I should feel a discernible difference in pressure pushing down on me.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #76 on: June 06, 2020, 12:16:36 AM »
There is no vacuum in the scale.
The top is pressed by the air from up and from down equally.

If you put scale in a vacuum bag and start sucking air out of it then the more air you suck out,
the more of the atmospheric pressure gets canceled and the scale gets pressed harder.
You can try with "Spacesaver", "Vacwel" or similar bag and vacuum cleaner.
Once the bag is flat it is exactly that. It's not a vacuum.

You do not suck air out of the bag, you push external atmospheric pressure away from the nozzle of that bag which adds more pressure to the external atmosphere which is pushed back onto the bag and starts to crush it from the outside...but it can only crush it until it rids the bag of the air inside which is the very same air that's also adding to that crush.
Can you understand that?



Quote from: Macarios
Find "Magdeburg Hemispheres" at YouTube and pay attention:
When the pressure inside is reduced enough and someone tries to separatethem, the hemispheres are held together by the atmosphetric pressure.
The atmospheric pressure that keeps them together holds them horizontaly, or in any other direction, not only vertically.
The spheres work in the same way as above. The only difference is in the strength of the cups.
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #77 on: June 06, 2020, 12:19:41 AM »
Two tidbits to point out:

1.
Pushing down vs pulling down.
If the stack above where to push down on someone (like a spring), their hair would be pushed flat to the "weight" of their entire body as the downward "push force" would start at dome-stack-hair-neck-body-feet-"scale"-ground.
There is no way hair gell companies would exist.
And most people would have much thicker necks.


2.
Lateral.
We live under a dome of frozen hydrogen and helium.
A dome, by definition will be a semi circular covering that extends from the ground up and over.
So if the air can stack vertically, it can stack horizontally.
Which it clearly doesnt since things dont fall sideways.
Pay attention to what's being and been said and you might understand.
Your issue is in spending too much time earlier in trying to ridicule when answers didn't suit you.
Try and get on board this time and be civil.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #78 on: June 06, 2020, 12:24:00 AM »
If I were to change my form would I feel less or more pressure pushing down on me?
For instance, if I outstretch my arms, would I feel more of the vertical downward pressure than if I stood with my arms at my sides?
You would transfer the pressure but the overall pressure upon your body would be the same.

Quote from: Stash
If I attached cardboard 'wings' to my outstretched arms, because of the now greater surface area, would I feel more vertical downward pressure?
Very slightly, you would feel that added pressure...and I mean very slightly due to the extra mass of the wings but also due to the massive porosity of them only leading to a small amount of extra mass pushing into the atmosphere.

Why only slightly? Iíve now made my footprint, as it were, larger, more surface area, without really increasing my mass. According to your theory, I should feel a discernible difference in pressure pushing down on me.
You will feel a discernible difference on your arms because they are now pushing into the atmosphere but you've created the same space between your body from which you moved your arms away from, so it cancels out the overall pressure you take up, meaning you do not take up more pressure, you only shift the body set up.
Adding cardboard wings is still adding more mass but only marginal, like I said, because the cardboard is mostly porous, which means it's already saturated with atmosphere with little of it adding to the compression upon you.

Take a bit of time to see what I'm saying.

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rabinoz

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #79 on: June 06, 2020, 12:32:53 AM »
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.
And of course the lack of pressure (partial vacuum) inside the spheres.

But I thought that your stacked atmosphere pushed downwards not sideways as necessary for the "Magdeburg Hemispheres".

You say that "And of course the pressure is all around".
But that is quite with the "stacked atmosphere" pushing you down causing your weight.


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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #80 on: June 06, 2020, 12:50:30 AM »
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.
And of course the lack of pressure (partial vacuum) inside the spheres.
The lack of pressure inside the spheres is transferred externally back onto those spheres into the already compressed atmosphere.


Quote from: rabinoz
But I thought that your stacked atmosphere pushed downwards not sideways as necessary for the "Magdeburg Hemispheres".
No.
It pushes in all directions, back onto anything that pushes into it.
Anything on the deck will be directly under the stack of atmosphere onto the mass that the above atmosphere can sit upon, meaning all that stacked atmosphere directly above the mass is not only sitting above the mass but also being compressed by that mass, which is using the deck as its own leverage/resistance.

Quote from: rabinoz
You say that "And of course the pressure is all around".
But that is quite with the "stacked atmosphere" pushing you down causing your weight.
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.


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rabinoz

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #81 on: June 06, 2020, 01:21:55 AM »
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.
And of course the lack of pressure (partial vacuum) inside the spheres.
The lack of pressure inside the spheres is transferred externally back onto those spheres into the already compressed atmosphere.

Quote from: rabinoz
But I thought that your stacked atmosphere pushed downwards not sideways as necessary for the "Magdeburg Hemispheres".
No.
It pushes in all directions, back onto anything that pushes into it.
Anything on the deck will be directly under the stack of atmosphere onto the mass that the above atmosphere can sit upon, meaning all that stacked atmosphere directly above the mass is not only sitting above the mass but also being compressed by that mass, which is using the deck as its own leverage/resistance.

Quote from: rabinoz
You say that "And of course the pressure is all around".
But that is quite with the "stacked atmosphere" pushing you down causing your weight.
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.
:o

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #82 on: June 06, 2020, 01:41:56 AM »
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.
And of course the lack of pressure (partial vacuum) inside the spheres.
The lack of pressure inside the spheres is transferred externally back onto those spheres into the already compressed atmosphere.

Quote from: rabinoz
But I thought that your stacked atmosphere pushed downwards not sideways as necessary for the "Magdeburg Hemispheres".
No.
It pushes in all directions, back onto anything that pushes into it.
Anything on the deck will be directly under the stack of atmosphere onto the mass that the above atmosphere can sit upon, meaning all that stacked atmosphere directly above the mass is not only sitting above the mass but also being compressed by that mass, which is using the deck as its own leverage/resistance.

Quote from: rabinoz
You say that "And of course the pressure is all around".
But that is quite with the "stacked atmosphere" pushing you down causing your weight.
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.
:o
Can't you get your head around that?

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rabinoz

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #83 on: June 06, 2020, 02:07:35 AM »
And of course the pressure is all around. I've always said this.
And of course the lack of pressure (partial vacuum) inside the spheres.
The lack of pressure inside the spheres is transferred externally back onto those spheres into the already compressed atmosphere.

Quote from: rabinoz
But I thought that your stacked atmosphere pushed downwards not sideways as necessary for the "Magdeburg Hemispheres".
No.
It pushes in all directions, back onto anything that pushes into it.
Anything on the deck will be directly under the stack of atmosphere onto the mass that the above atmosphere can sit upon, meaning all that stacked atmosphere directly above the mass is not only sitting above the mass but also being compressed by that mass, which is using the deck as its own leverage/resistance.

Quote from: rabinoz
You say that "And of course the pressure is all around".
But that is quite with the "stacked atmosphere" pushing you down causing your weight.
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.
:o
Can't you get your head around that?
No!
Whether you accept it or not you do have mass because mass is an inherent property of an object whether anyone measures it or not.
Weight is just the force an object applies to whatever is supporting it - eg a seat or the floor.
Likewise objects do have weight whether anyone measures it or not.

Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #84 on: June 06, 2020, 05:17:40 AM »
Two tidbits to point out:

1.
Pushing down vs pulling down.
If the stack above where to push down on someone (like a spring), their hair would be pushed flat to the "weight" of their entire body as the downward "push force" would start at dome-stack-hair-neck-body-feet-"scale"-ground.
There is no way hair gell companies would exist.
And most people would have much thicker necks.


2.
Lateral.
We live under a dome of frozen hydrogen and helium.
A dome, by definition will be a semi circular covering that extends from the ground up and over.
So if the air can stack vertically, it can stack horizontally.
Which it clearly doesnt since things dont fall sideways.
Pay attention to what's being and been said and you might understand.
Your issue is in spending too much time earlier in trying to ridicule when answers didn't suit you.
Try and get on board this time and be civil.

No address to a simple problem - how does hair gel withstand theveright of a 170lb man?

Vontinue to dogde and hand wave all "tough" questions away.

Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #85 on: June 06, 2020, 05:20:10 AM »

You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.


So if a tree falls in the forest, and no man made scale is around to weigh it, would it not crush the beaver below it?

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JJA

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #86 on: June 06, 2020, 09:15:27 AM »
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.
:o
Can't you get your head around that?

How do scales work in vacuum chambers?  There is no 'atmospheric stack' in there.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #87 on: June 07, 2020, 04:57:34 AM »

No!
Whether you accept it or not you do have mass because mass is an inherent property of an object whether anyone measures it or not.
Weight is just the force an object applies to whatever is supporting it - eg a seat or the floor.
Likewise objects do have weight whether anyone measures it or not.
How do you know an object has weight if you cannot use some kind of man made scale to measure the mass to actually understand the differences in man made measured weight numbers?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #88 on: June 07, 2020, 04:59:08 AM »
Two tidbits to point out:

1.
Pushing down vs pulling down.
If the stack above where to push down on someone (like a spring), their hair would be pushed flat to the "weight" of their entire body as the downward "push force" would start at dome-stack-hair-neck-body-feet-"scale"-ground.
There is no way hair gell companies would exist.
And most people would have much thicker necks.


2.
Lateral.
We live under a dome of frozen hydrogen and helium.
A dome, by definition will be a semi circular covering that extends from the ground up and over.
So if the air can stack vertically, it can stack horizontally.
Which it clearly doesnt since things dont fall sideways.
Pay attention to what's being and been said and you might understand.
Your issue is in spending too much time earlier in trying to ridicule when answers didn't suit you.
Try and get on board this time and be civil.

No address to a simple problem - how does hair gel withstand theveright of a 170lb man?

Vontinue to dogde and hand wave all "tough" questions away.
Hair gel doesn't have to withstand the weight of a  are you talking about?......Explain.
Is the person standing on the tub of hair gel?

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 30068
Re: Sea and air pressure
« Reply #89 on: June 07, 2020, 05:02:44 AM »
You cannot weigh anything unless you have the mass and man made weight measuring tool directly under the above atmospheric stack upon that mass and scale.
:o
Can't you get your head around that?

How do scales work in vacuum chambers?  There is no 'atmospheric stack' in there.
There's always a stack.
All objects under lowered pressure will expand to meet that pressure. All objects under pressure will compress to allow it.