FE explanation of lunar eclipse

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FE explanation of lunar eclipse
« on: November 04, 2019, 02:45:27 PM »
FE Wiki starts its explanation thus;
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A Lunar Eclipse occurs about twice a year when a satellite of the sun passes between the sun and moon.

Yes that 'satellite' of the Sun is the Earth.

It has been well known for a long time how and why a lunar eclipse happens. So I don't understand what the necessity is to introduce a 'shadow object' which apparently is never seen. The account given by Mr Rowbotham;

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But that an eclipse of the moon arises from a shadow of the earth, is a statement in every respect, because unproved, unsatisfactory. The earth has been proved to be without orbital or axial motion; and, therefore, it could never come between the sun and the moon. The earth is also proved to be a plane, always underneath the sun and moon

is all a figment of his imagination. Take these two statements for example:

"The Earth has been proved to be without orbital or axial motion".
"The Earth has been proved to be a plane, always underneath the Sun and the Moon"

In both cases how can you claim that something which is not true has been 'proved'? Especially with the equipment and tools available during the mid 1850s.

A solar eclipse is caused by the shadow of the Moon falling on the surface of the Earth.  How can that happen if the Moon and Sun are always above the Earth? The cone shaped shadow of the Moon always lies in line with, and points in the opposite direction of the Sun.  In other words the Sun, Moon and Earth need to be in a direct line.  That can happen quite easily if the Moon orbits the Earth at an inclination of 5 degrees to the Earths orbit around the Sun. The tiny area over which a total eclipse of the Sun can be seen from at any one time can also be explained by the fact that the Moon is considerably smaller than the Earth.  Even the ancient Greeks knew that.

The only way you could get a solar eclipse if the Earth is flat would be if the Moon is lower down and therefore closer to the Sun? That can't be right though because FE Wiki maintains that both the Sun and the Moon are both the same size (i.e. 32 miles across) and both 3000 miles above the Earth. The trouble with that idea is that the crater Copernicus has been measured to have a diameter of around 50 miles.  So you can't really have a single crater that has a larger diameter than the whole of the Moon can you!?!

So if you want to continue to assert that the Earth is flat and that the Sun and Moon are both the same size and same distance from Earth, then to make eclipses work you need to invent some as yet unknown system which is capable of bending light far more significantly than anything which is known to science.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2019, 02:59:19 PM by Nucleosynthesis »

Re: FE explanation of lunar eclipse
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2019, 06:38:33 PM »
then to make eclipses work you need to invent some as yet unknown system which is capable of bending light far more significantly than anything which is known to science.
No problem inventing such if you can invent a flat earth not known to science. Wise will come up with something. Hang on.

Re: FE explanation of lunar eclipse
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2019, 02:19:06 AM »
No doubt.

I'm just curious to know where FE theoriests got this figure of 32 miles from for the diameter of the Moon. There are many craters that are wider than that.  I used Copernicus as an example because it is a particularly prominent crater which is very well placed during first/last quarter Moon.  There are many more though which are also wider than 32 miles.  Here is a list for example of some of them.  51.5km is 32 miles.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_craters_on_the_Moon

The actual distance of the Moon has been measured using a number of different methods including radar, laser ranging and trigonometrical parallax.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 04:16:57 AM by Nucleosynthesis »

Re: FE explanation of lunar eclipse
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2019, 05:14:35 AM »
As I understand it, they take the angle from a couple of locations to get about 3000 miles height and then use the angular size to get the diameter.  Itís more usually used to describe the sun, but the moon apparently is supposed to be similar.

https://wiki.tfes.org/Distance_to_the_Sun

This of course only works for a couple of carefully selected locations and seems to ignore all the bendy light and magic perspective arguments used to hand-wave other observations, but consistency is not exactly a flat earth strong suit.

Re: FE explanation of lunar eclipse
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2019, 05:49:00 AM »
Yes the problem with that method is that they are taking the Earth surface as being a straight line.  The principle is sound enough when you are dealing with a triangle as in this case, but that requires the Earths surface to be flat.

If you apply this approach to calculating the distance of the Sun you will get the wrong answer because the Earths surface is not flat.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 05:53:44 AM by Nucleosynthesis »