Let's Own NASAs Hackathon

  • 33 Replies
  • 3162 Views
*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« on: October 16, 2019, 08:24:51 AM »
https://www.spaceappschallenge.org

Anyone game for a Flat Earth app?
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

rvlvr

  • 2142
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2019, 08:40:12 AM »
I canít wait for one!

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 42012
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2019, 08:42:48 AM »
Can you trust "NASAís free and open data to address real-world problems on [a flat] Earth and in space"?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2019, 10:12:02 AM »
Can you trust "NASAís free and open data to address real-world problems on [a flat] Earth and in space"?
I imagine that depends on the problem. Can we trust their data to be inconsistent? Of course. Can we use its inconsistencies to evidence the earth is not a globe? Quite likely.
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

rvlvr

  • 2142
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2019, 10:17:53 AM »
It is a noble endeavour.

I wish you luck!

*

Yes

  • 604
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2019, 10:29:03 AM »
Can we use its inconsistencies to evidence the earth is not a globe? Quite likely.
What do you suppose it would take to do this?
Signatures are displayed at the bottom of each post or personal message. BBCode and smileys may be used in your signature.

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2019, 11:27:09 AM »
I would have to research more on their data and the data available elsewhere, but if you want me to shoot in the dark:

Due to time constraints I'd look at an unsupervised algorithm, especially if the data is appropriately categorized. I'd look at a classification algorithm to determine whether it is coherent and supports a round earth - perhaps even a competitive classification algorithm. I'd likely use an open library for doing this, and pipe it into that.

Alternately, we could take a non-machine learning based approach. Taking the National High Altitude Photography data set which is meant to cover the contiguous states at 40,000 feet we can extrapolate how much overlay should exist between the photos given a flat surface photograph being placed on top of a globe. If this value differs, we have solved a problem.

The bulk of the work is in finding "good" data.

Another idea: take the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) dataset and compare it to newer and older attempts.

Another: cross reference attempts to map the coast of the antarctic over years and show inconsistency.

Another: Look at their landslides by country data set and see if it correlates with coriolis effects.


So to answer you:
1) Find a good data set
2) program something to read it in
3) write something to analyze it
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2019, 11:29:13 AM »
Land surface temperatures at night vs path of sun on a flat earth
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2019, 11:31:21 AM »
Use their heliocentric trajectory api to cross reference existing data on observed trajectories.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2019, 11:55:59 AM »
Land surface temperatures at night vs path of sun on a flat earth

Sounds like this would introduce lots of variables unnecessarily.  Therefore increasing the chance of making faulty interpretations of the results.

If you want confirm the flat earth sun path, why not just compare visually?  Is it because you already know how that one turns out?
« Last Edit: October 16, 2019, 12:36:39 PM by Unconvinced »

*

Yes

  • 604
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2019, 12:16:20 PM »
1) Find a good data set
2) program something to read it in
3) write something to analyze it
;D
Signatures are displayed at the bottom of each post or personal message. BBCode and smileys may be used in your signature.

*

EvolvedMantisShrimp

  • 927
  • Physical Comedian
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2019, 12:59:29 PM »
Land surface temperatures at night vs path of sun on a flat earth

And of course, you are going to factor in cloud cover, prevailing wind and water currents, etc. Right?
Nullius in Verba

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2019, 01:02:14 PM »
I have no idea what that data set has. As I said, I'm just spitballing having not looked into the data specifically. There are about 10,000 data sets and I just picked out a few at more or less random to provide a starting point for discussion.

What would you suggest?
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 42012
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2019, 04:01:23 PM »
Do they have any geographic data-sets that could be used to generate a flat earth map?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

Gumwars

  • 783
  • A poke in your eye good sir...
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2019, 07:40:21 PM »
How about a map?  You know, a standardized one that is commonly accepted among the entire FE community?  That would be a good start. 

Wait!  I got it, how about an app that shows me which Sigma Octantis is the real one south of the equator!  You know, because the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!  That would be a good app too!

How about an app that shows how those 747s flying out of Sydney break the speed of sound on the way to Santiago? 
Quote from: Carl Sagan
We should endeavor to always keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out.

*

Bullwinkle

  • The Elder Ones
  • 20126
  • Standard Idiot
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2019, 08:46:37 PM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

*

Gumwars

  • 783
  • A poke in your eye good sir...
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2019, 09:58:47 PM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

How deep into the bottle are you on a Wednesday night??
Quote from: Carl Sagan
We should endeavor to always keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out.

Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2019, 09:51:40 AM »
I would have to research more on their data and the data available elsewhere, but if you want me to shoot in the dark:

Due to time constraints I'd look at an unsupervised algorithm, especially if the data is appropriately categorized. I'd look at a classification algorithm to determine whether it is coherent and supports a round earth - perhaps even a competitive classification algorithm. I'd likely use an open library for doing this, and pipe it into that.

Alternately, we could take a non-machine learning based approach. Taking the National High Altitude Photography data set which is meant to cover the contiguous states at 40,000 feet we can extrapolate how much overlay should exist between the photos given a flat surface photograph being placed on top of a globe. If this value differs, we have solved a problem.

The bulk of the work is in finding "good" data.

Another idea: take the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) dataset and compare it to newer and older attempts.

Another: cross reference attempts to map the coast of the antarctic over years and show inconsistency.

Another: Look at their landslides by country data set and see if it correlates with coriolis effects.


So to answer you:
1) Find a good data set
2) program something to read it in
3) write something to analyze it

You know you can literally just see if the sun moves faster in a southern summer vs. a northern summer.
Quote from: Heiwa
You are ignoring this user. Show me the post.

*

faded mike

  • 2278
  • new world tattoo drill scar + I'm thinkin flat
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #18 on: October 20, 2019, 09:55:48 PM »
Cool!
" Using our vast surveillance system, we've uncovered revolutionary new information..."
           -them

I am not a druggy

*

Bullwinkle

  • The Elder Ones
  • 20126
  • Standard Idiot
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2019, 01:48:07 AM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

How deep into the bottle are you on a Wednesday night??


You said, ". . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!"

Do you understand that maps look down and Star Charts look up?

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2019, 09:12:44 AM »
Even if we don't do the hackathon, I'm going to start looking through this data to see if there's anything we can use.
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

rvlvr

  • 2142
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2019, 09:21:30 AM »
Crap. I hoped for an app.

*

NotSoSkeptical

  • 7116
  • Flatness as in the shape of a water droplet.
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2019, 09:29:28 AM »
Even if we don't do the hackathon, I'm going to start looking through this data to see if there's anything we can use.

Conceding already?
Rabinoz RIP

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2019, 09:34:10 AM »
Nah, just saying *if*. :)

I'm still interested if I can get help. And we sign up of course.
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

MaNaeSWolf

  • 1985
  • Show me the evidence
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2019, 09:38:05 AM »
Why dont you guys just make an app that shows flight paths of planes as they travers on different map projections for comparison. Real time for extra points. Then you can try different projections out.

What data is available that is not usually open to the public?

*

Gumwars

  • 783
  • A poke in your eye good sir...
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2019, 08:38:33 PM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

How deep into the bottle are you on a Wednesday night??


You said, ". . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!"

Do you understand that maps look down and Star Charts look up?

And I stand by my question regarding your midweek drinking habits because it takes either extreme inebriation or complete ignorance to not understand how the two relate to one another.  Pray tell, honorable moose, what would a star chart look like if the Earth were not a globe?  What relation would it necessarily have to the land beneath it if we were using it for navigation?  Would you care to speculate?
Quote from: Carl Sagan
We should endeavor to always keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out.

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 16862
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2019, 11:15:25 AM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

How deep into the bottle are you on a Wednesday night??


You said, ". . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!"

Do you understand that maps look down and Star Charts look up?

And I stand by my question regarding your midweek drinking habits because it takes either extreme inebriation or complete ignorance to not understand how the two relate to one another.  Pray tell, honorable moose, what would a star chart look like if the Earth were not a globe?  What relation would it necessarily have to the land beneath it if we were using it for navigation?  Would you care to speculate?
Star charts would obviously look the same as they are based off observation, and only later is that interpreted as representative of one of many (in actuality infinite) eligible models.
Quantum Ab Hoc

*

Gumwars

  • 783
  • A poke in your eye good sir...
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2019, 03:39:26 PM »

. . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!

Earth maps point down. At the dirt.

How deep into the bottle are you on a Wednesday night??


You said, ". . . the most commonly used flat Earth map totally makes a mess of the Southern Cross!"

Do you understand that maps look down and Star Charts look up?

And I stand by my question regarding your midweek drinking habits because it takes either extreme inebriation or complete ignorance to not understand how the two relate to one another.  Pray tell, honorable moose, what would a star chart look like if the Earth were not a globe?  What relation would it necessarily have to the land beneath it if we were using it for navigation?  Would you care to speculate?
Star charts would obviously look the same as they are based off observation, and only later is that interpreted as representative of one of many (in actuality infinite) eligible models.

John, you can play cute all day; we both know this is a problem that has yet to be solved with any of the FE models.  Do we really need to discuss this again?  The point regarding Sigma Octantis has been brought up countless times on this forum, multiple times in your presence, and at least twice by me directly looking for an answer from you.  If the Earth is an infinite plane or if we are using the Gleason map, Sigma Octantis location in the night sky is paradoxical.  As its location is not paradoxical in reality, we know that either those maps are incomplete or incorrect. 

Care to take a crack at it?
Quote from: Carl Sagan
We should endeavor to always keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out.

Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2019, 10:46:05 PM »

Star charts would obviously look the same as they are based off observation, and only later is that interpreted as representative of one of many (in actuality infinite) eligible models.

What like this?



Half of this chart shouldn't exist for a flat earth. 

*

Tom Bishop

  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 17796
Re: Let's Own NASAs Hackathon
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2019, 05:32:18 AM »
Actually, if you are spinning around in a circle bodies should travel straightly, not curve in the sky. Which brings to question why the ecliptic is curved, and why the celestial bodies often travel in curved paths across the sky, sometimes in a convex or concave manner.