A couple of questions

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A couple of questions
« on: September 23, 2019, 06:36:24 AM »
I find the flat earth theory very interesting. I'm a very sceptical person (hence the interest in this theory) so I do have some questions.

First of all, you say the earth is flat and other planets are round. If you are not connected to a religion, how was the earth created? Why exactly is it flat? Are there other planets far far away that are also flat?

How do you explain satellites? What about falling stars?

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John Davis

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Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2019, 01:34:44 PM »
Only Flat Planet

This is an interesting question.

Asking why is earth the only flat planet betrays a logical fallacy. Karl Popper talks about this in Logic of Scientific Discovery, and its a well covered topic in philosophy of science, presenting one of the largest issues with empiricism.

As it turns out, each planet we view that is round actually makes it more probable that the earth is flat - this is one of the issues behind the problem of induction. Since the earth being flat has a non-zero probability, each time we observe a round object it reduces the solution space, thus making the non-zero probability have a higher likelihood.

More than this, the idea is logically faulty. I may see a grey goose out my window each day. Does this mean all geese are grey?  In other words, since I can say Object A and Object B are both blue, does that make Object C blue? or Object D? Or all other objects?!


It is possible there are other flat planets, and even NASA has purportedly observed many flat bodies.


Creation
I talk to this a bit here:Flat Earth Interview
Quote
I am sure you are tired of this question, but if the Earth is flat, what might be on the other side?

Not at all. While it might be fun to speculate about the other side, I tend not to guess without sufficient reason. Unfortunately, all I can say is that I don’t know. I haven’t been there. To go further than that would be to attempt to stretch a very small tarp over a very large area with the hopes that it would not tear. You would either fail, or perhaps worse, ruin your tarp.

This is somewhat similar to what I feel many are doing in modern physics in regards to the Big Bang. Not satisfied with what they have, scientists have now taken one more step towards being a religion with the creation of their own Genesis. While it’s fine to say “this is what looks like happened”, it’s also quite silly to hold the Big Bang as something that is “true.” A scientist has the obligation to point out the obvious (and not so obvious) flaws in his argument as well as why he believes it. If he does not do that, he’s just an academic pushing a precarious point of view—essentially a used car salesman. One has to recognize that we believe in is a constant falsehood so that we can reach towards a truth that may not be attainable formally or within one system.
So, in essence, we don't know and we don't feel like creating a religion like the orthodoxy has.


I explain satellites differently than most flatists, so I'll leave that to them.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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faded mike

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Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2019, 09:02:35 PM »
I'm not a learned flat earhter, but I suspect mainstream scientists powers of deduction may not be adequate to figure all this out. John Davis said "problems with induction", not sure what it means but I suspect it means scientist are missing some pretty big pieces of the puzzle in mainsteam thought. I think that the laws of physics we observe in the lab, things don't always work like that, especially on the bigger scale. For example I've heard there is evidence that the "spectral lines" we attribute to sunlights source may be coming from what's between us and the sun.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2019, 10:28:42 PM by faded mike »
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Tom Bishop

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Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2019, 04:25:47 AM »
Why should basketballs be round but not the basketball court?

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John Davis

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Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2019, 08:41:03 PM »
Really? Come on Fake Tom. Come on.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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John Davis

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Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2019, 08:43:13 PM »
Yes, our kitchen flours are flat... Really? A round basketball court would be pretty darned fun.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: A couple of questions
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2019, 07:41:57 PM »
Yes, our kitchen flours are flat... Really? A round basketball court would be pretty darned fun.
Where would you place the basketball hoops
That that is, is. That that is not, is not. Is that it? It is.
That that is, is that that is. Not is not. Is that it? It is.
The earth is a globe.