Mintaka

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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Mintaka
« on: July 21, 2019, 09:03:14 PM »
Mintaka is a very special star in a very special constellation. It is the right-most of the three stars in Orion's Belt. Orion's Belt in general and Mintaka in particular are very useful for navigation at sea. That's because Orion's belt rises in the East and sets in the West. Mintaka does so almost exactly. It rises within a degree of due East and sets within a degree of due West. That's very handy; especially since this happens from anywhere on Earth. No matter where you are, Mintaka rises due East and sets Due West.

Okay, so here is the point of this little navigation lesson: Take two cities on nearly the same line of longitude one north of the Equator and one south of the Equator. For an example, let's use Boston, Massachusetts in the USA and Santiago, Chile. They are within a degree of eachother. In each of those cities, Mintaka would rise about the same time(very soon, actually. Probably within the hour) from due East. Now here is my question:

On a Flat Earth, how could Mintaka rise from due East in Boston, Massachusetts and Santiago, Chile at the same time?
Nullius in Verba

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wise

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Re: Mintaka
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2019, 05:27:03 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)

« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 05:37:10 AM by wise »
boydster the angry globalist being a mod is my red line. During he continues to be mod, others will be ignored till infinity.






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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Re: Mintaka
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2019, 08:16:57 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.
Nullius in Verba

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wise

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Re: Mintaka
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2019, 11:14:17 PM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.
boydster the angry globalist being a mod is my red line. During he continues to be mod, others will be ignored till infinity.






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Stash

  • 2439
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2019, 12:25:29 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.

Look it up. And look up. Use your flat earth star finder.

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wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18195
  • Backstage
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2019, 01:31:38 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.

Look it up. And look up. Use your flat earth star finder.

Inother say, you can't show it at the sky because it is absent in fact, right?
boydster the angry globalist being a mod is my red line. During he continues to be mod, others will be ignored till infinity.






*

Stash

  • 2439
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2019, 01:53:57 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.

Look it up. And look up. Use your flat earth star finder.

Inother say, you can't show it at the sky because it is absent in fact, right?

Wrong. For you and I, it's the third button on Orion's belt. Always East/West - Sliding across the sky like so. Funny that way. Factor it in, to your map that is. My understanding is that Mintaka is the sauciest of the three sisters in the strap. So be careful.

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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Re: Mintaka
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2019, 04:20:56 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.

I see. Well if being the rightmost star on Orion's Belt and it always rising in nearly due East and setting nearly due West is not enough information to find it, look for it at Right Ascension 5h 32min 00.40009s, Declination -00 17' 56.7424".

Nullius in Verba

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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Re: Mintaka
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2019, 06:33:09 PM »
So... how go the Mintaka observations?
Nullius in Verba

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napoleon

  • 905
  • The Earth is not round, nor flat. It is a Donut...
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2019, 01:29:28 AM »
Mintaka is a very special star in a very special constellation. It is the right-most of the three stars in Orion's Belt. Orion's Belt in general and Mintaka in particular are very useful for navigation at sea. That's because Orion's belt rises in the East and sets in the West. Mintaka does so almost exactly. It rises within a degree of due East and sets within a degree of due West. That's very handy; especially since this happens from anywhere on Earth. No matter where you are, Mintaka rises due East and sets Due West.

Okay, so here is the point of this little navigation lesson: Take two cities on nearly the same line of longitude one north of the Equator and one south of the Equator. For an example, let's use Boston, Massachusetts in the USA and Santiago, Chile. They are within a degree of eachother. In each of those cities, Mintaka would rise about the same time(very soon, actually. Probably within the hour) from due East. Now here is my question:

On a Flat Earth, how could Mintaka rise from due East in Boston, Massachusetts and Santiago, Chile at the same time?
What confuses me at this moment, is that if those two cities are less than a degree of each other, then why would Mintaka rise about the same time (within the hour) in both cities?
The Earth spins around with 15 degrees pro hour, so 1 degree in about 4 minutes.
So I would think it first rises in Santiago and after 4 minutes it would rise in Boston.
Never argue with an idiot...
First they will drag you down to their own level,
and then they beat you by experience...

*

EvolvedMantisShrimp

  • 753
  • Physical Comedian
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2019, 02:43:22 AM »
Mintaka is a very special star in a very special constellation. It is the right-most of the three stars in Orion's Belt. Orion's Belt in general and Mintaka in particular are very useful for navigation at sea. That's because Orion's belt rises in the East and sets in the West. Mintaka does so almost exactly. It rises within a degree of due East and sets within a degree of due West. That's very handy; especially since this happens from anywhere on Earth. No matter where you are, Mintaka rises due East and sets Due West.

Okay, so here is the point of this little navigation lesson: Take two cities on nearly the same line of longitude one north of the Equator and one south of the Equator. For an example, let's use Boston, Massachusetts in the USA and Santiago, Chile. They are within a degree of eachother. In each of those cities, Mintaka would rise about the same time(very soon, actually. Probably within the hour) from due East. Now here is my question:

On a Flat Earth, how could Mintaka rise from due East in Boston, Massachusetts and Santiago, Chile at the same time?
What confuses me at this moment, is that if those two cities are less than a degree of each other, then why would Mintaka rise about the same time (within the hour) in both cities?
The Earth spins around with 15 degrees pro hour, so 1 degree in about 4 minutes.
So I would think it first rises in Santiago and after 4 minutes it would rise in Boston.

I would call 4 minutes apart about the same time, wouldn't you?
Nullius in Verba

Re: Mintaka
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2019, 05:27:50 AM »
There are Montaka, Muntaka, Mantaka, Lintaka, Sintaka and Tintaka stars on flat earth. I'll show you them on a video after I buy a Nikon 1000. We are discovering new stars every day.  :)



The second video contains Obama hasen't time. I hope you like it. :)



Do you know what I would really like?

Addressing my topic.

Okay. I'll observe Mintaka too. Give me its exact location on sky dome.

Look it up. And look up. Use your flat earth star finder.

Inother say, you can't show it at the sky because it is absent in fact, right?

Are you saying that you can't go outside at night and find the constellation of Orion?
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

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napoleon

  • 905
  • The Earth is not round, nor flat. It is a Donut...
Re: Mintaka
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2019, 06:21:46 AM »
Mintaka is a very special star in a very special constellation. It is the right-most of the three stars in Orion's Belt. Orion's Belt in general and Mintaka in particular are very useful for navigation at sea. That's because Orion's belt rises in the East and sets in the West. Mintaka does so almost exactly. It rises within a degree of due East and sets within a degree of due West. That's very handy; especially since this happens from anywhere on Earth. No matter where you are, Mintaka rises due East and sets Due West.

Okay, so here is the point of this little navigation lesson: Take two cities on nearly the same line of longitude one north of the Equator and one south of the Equator. For an example, let's use Boston, Massachusetts in the USA and Santiago, Chile. They are within a degree of eachother. In each of those cities, Mintaka would rise about the same time(very soon, actually. Probably within the hour) from due East. Now here is my question:

On a Flat Earth, how could Mintaka rise from due East in Boston, Massachusetts and Santiago, Chile at the same time?
What confuses me at this moment, is that if those two cities are less than a degree of each other, then why would Mintaka rise about the same time (within the hour) in both cities?
The Earth spins around with 15 degrees pro hour, so 1 degree in about 4 minutes.
So I would think it first rises in Santiago and after 4 minutes it would rise in Boston.

I would call 4 minutes apart about the same time, wouldn't you?
Yes I would too...definitely...
only the words "within the hour" confused me....just details...sorry ;)
Never argue with an idiot...
First they will drag you down to their own level,
and then they beat you by experience...