Sky colors

  • 50 Replies
  • 2106 Views
?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Sky colors
« on: May 07, 2019, 12:40:18 PM »
I would like to know the FET explanation for the blue sky, and how it is getting slightly green, yellow, orange and red during sun rise and sun set.  :)
Especially with the sun spot light from top being within the dome.
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

*

wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18610
  • Backstage
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2019, 12:47:22 PM »
You are in many topics so I will reply them when I find enough time.

Sky is water and blue is the color of water. Repeating; blue is the colour of water. Water is not colorless, it is blue. That's all about blue sky.

Sun is yellow and it has a circle represent its coming or going. This is a halo has red color. Other colors happen by chemical reaction when suns colour meet downside air. If the yellow light of the sun is combined with blue, green color may occur. and red color halos and other colors can be combined to create any color.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2019, 02:18:41 PM »
Sky is water and blue is the color of water.
Then it should be blue all the time. So that doesn't cut it.

Other colors happen by chemical reaction when suns colour meet downside air
What chemical reactions?


If the yellow light of the sun is combined with blue, green color may occur.
That would only explain looking directly at the sun.

@OP, it could be the same as the RE explanation.
You have light being scattered by the sun with shorter wavelengths scattered more.

*

rabinoz

  • 22561
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2019, 06:19:21 PM »
You are in many topics so I will reply them when I find enough time.

Sky is water and blue is the color of water.  That's all about blue sky.
The blue colour of the sky has nothing at all to do with the colour of water, the sea or the ocean! Look at these photos:

Karajini Gorge National Park, Western Australia[1]
And Karajini Gorge National Park, Western Australia is over 210 km from the closest ocean!

Then this photo:

Mt Stromlo 74in Telescope Dome, now burnt due bushfire
And Mt Stromlo is almost 120 km from the nearest sea!

Then another far inland photo in Australia with a very blue sky a far from any ocean!

Start of the Great Central Road
This photo is taken over 700 km from the nearest ocean.

So, Mr Wise, the Sky is not water and the sky does not get its colour from the water or the ocean.
And the sky is most blue when the air is very dry and clean as in the above photos that I took myself!

The sky is blue because of:
Quote
Rayleigh scattering
the scattering of light by particles in a medium, without change in wavelength. It accounts, for example, for the blue colour of the sky, since blue light is scattered slightly more efficiently than red.

[1] That photo in Karajini Gorge National Park is taken under the light of a full moon proving that moonlight is almost identical to sunlight.

*

John Davis

  • Secretary Of The Society
  • Administrator
  • 15652
  • Most Prolific Scientist, 2019
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2019, 09:56:58 PM »
Air scatters light.
Quantum Ab Hoc

?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2019, 11:13:20 PM »
You are in many topics so I will reply them when I find enough time.

Sky is water and blue is the color of water. Repeating; blue is the colour of water. Water is not colorless, it is blue. That's all about blue sky.

Sun is yellow and it has a circle represent its coming or going. This is a halo has red color. Other colors happen by chemical reaction when suns colour meet downside air. If the yellow light of the sun is combined with blue, green color may occur. and red color halos and other colors can be combined to create any color.

Sky is water? What is about clouds? (And their color)
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

*

rabinoz

  • 22561
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2019, 11:39:18 PM »
Air scatters light.
That's what I said with:The sky is blue because of:
Quote
Rayleigh scattering
the scattering of light by particles in a medium, without change in wavelength. It accounts, for example, for the blue colour of the sky, since blue light is scattered slightly more efficiently than red.

*

wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18610
  • Backstage
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2019, 11:51:33 PM »
You are in many topics so I will reply them when I find enough time.

Sky is water and blue is the color of water. Repeating; blue is the colour of water. Water is not colorless, it is blue. That's all about blue sky.

Sun is yellow and it has a circle represent its coming or going. This is a halo has red color. Other colors happen by chemical reaction when suns colour meet downside air. If the yellow light of the sun is combined with blue, green color may occur. and red color halos and other colors can be combined to create any color.

Sky is water? What is about clouds? (And their color)

This is not a new thing. Everybody knows that sky is water. Since sky is water so that sky is blue. I think clouds isn't the issue here. If you want what is clouds we can talk about it in another thread you may open.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2019, 12:40:48 AM »
This is not a new thing.
The old thing you are thinking of is the magic firmament with magic water above it.
Not the sky itself being water.


Everybody knows that sky is water.
No, they don't.
No one knows that as it is false.

Sane people know the sky is just air, which contains lots of things, but primarily nitrogen and oxygen.

Again, if the sky was actually blue rather than simply appearing blue, then it would be blue anytime there was light on it. So even at sunset you would expect a nice blue sky.
THIS DOESN'T HAPPEN!
This indicates the sky is not blue and instead merely appears blue for some other reason.

*

wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18610
  • Backstage
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2019, 02:12:44 AM »
<crying deleted>
Adults are talking. Wait your line, boy.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2019, 02:39:34 AM »
If the sky is water, why aren't I drowning right now?

Also, what are the seas? Concentrated water?
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2019, 03:13:54 AM »
Adults are talking. Wait your line, boy.
Why the need to resort to pathetic insults?
Is it because you know you cannot rationally defend your claims?

Yes, the adults are talking. You can either continue to act like a child or try acting like a rational adult.

Again, the sky is air, not water. There is no reason at all to think the sky is water. If you wish to make such an outlandish claim, it would require evidence.
But that is a side issue.

The main issue is your claim regarding the colouration of the sky.

If the sky was actually blue, it should appear blue any time it is illuminated. It wouldn't just appear blue during the day, turning red at sunset.
This massive change in apparent colouration shows the colouration is apparent, caused by some effect rather than it being the intrinsic colour of the sky.

Can you address this or are you only capable of repeating the same childish garbage?

*

rabinoz

  • 22561
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2019, 03:20:34 AM »
Everybody knows that sky is water. Since sky is water so that sky is blue.
Everybody does not know that the sky is water!
Quote
At 30 C (86 F), for example, a volume of air can contain up to 4 percent water vapour. When a volume of air at a given temperature holds the maximum amount of water vapour, the air is said to be saturated.
But in deserts the relativity is usually quite low.
Quote
Average daytime relative humidity ranges from 10 percent to 30 percent.
So the water vapour in the air in the desert photos I posted is only from about 0.5% to 1%.

So, no the sky is not water! It is normally no more than 1% to 2% of the mass
Have a look at these photos from Central Australia again. The first is from a very dry region and the second is from a real desert region.
Sky is water and blue is the color of water.  That's all about blue sky.
The blue colour of the sky has nothing at all to do with the colour of water, the sea or the ocean! Look at these photos:

Karajini Gorge National Park, Western Australia[1]
And this photo is taken over 210 km from the closest ocean!
       

Start of the Great Central Road
This photo is taken over 700 km from the nearest ocean.

[1] That photo in Karajini Gorge National Park is taken under the light of a full moon proving that moonlight is almost identical to sunlight.

*

wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18610
  • Backstage
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2019, 06:24:47 AM »
<crap deleted>
<shit deleted>
I told you mister rabinoz, or jackblack, you clone sisters.

Wait to your line; adults are talking here. Or you can bark till forever to yourself, no body will reply you, because there is nobody respect you here. If you want to see a recpect here, so wait to your line, ie end of adults talk here.


If the sky is water, why aren't I drowning right now?

Also, what are the seas? Concentrated water?

Oh, sky is water; air isn't.  :) Sky, is the thing we define as "dome".

Sea is water, simple water. You can see even pool water as blue many times. The water in h20 format is "about colorless". Actually it has a ver few blue color because of oxygen, but we can not aware it. But temperature, other elements, and other reasons, water is not only in h2o format. it generally contains free oxygen, ozone and free hydrogen.

Main colour of oxygen is blue when it in liquid format. Inother say, free oxygen gives its color to water which has not color as main shape. And water has slightly blue because of Oxygen in H2O. Both Oxygen in water and free oxygen give their color; blue to the water.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2019, 07:56:09 AM »
If the sky is water, why aren't I drowning right now?

Also, what are the seas? Concentrated water?

Oh, sky is water; air isn't.  :) Sky, is the thing we define as "dome".

Sky is water, sky is dome. So dome is water? What keeps it up? How do you embed the geostationary satellite simulator transmitters into water? Perhaps they have outboard motors on them so they can sail across the dome sea pretending to be non-geostationary satellites? Is rain just water falling from the dome? What if rain hits the sun or moon on the way down? Are there fish in the dome?

So many questions that will never get answers because it's inconvenient to the "truth" ;)
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2019, 11:03:02 AM »
<crap deleted>
<shit deleted>
I told you mister rabinoz, or jackblack, you clone sisters.

Wait to your line; adults are talking here. Or you can bark till forever to yourself, no body will reply you, because there is nobody respect you here. If you want to see a recpect here, so wait to your line, ie end of adults talk here.


If the sky is water, why aren't I drowning right now?

Also, what are the seas? Concentrated water?

Oh, sky is water; air isn't.  :) Sky, is the thing we define as "dome".

Sea is water, simple water. You can see even pool water as blue many times. The water in h20 format is "about colorless". Actually it has a ver few blue color because of oxygen, but we can not aware it. But temperature, other elements, and other reasons, water is not only in h2o format. it generally contains free oxygen, ozone and free hydrogen.

Main colour of oxygen is blue when it in liquid format. Inother say, free oxygen gives its color to water which has not color as main shape. And water has slightly blue because of Oxygen in H2O. Both Oxygen in water and free oxygen give their color; blue to the water.

Where did you gain all your science knowledge from? I learned the things you speak of to be differently (and more plausible, to be honest).
Do you have a public reference for anything, that you posted in this thread? Or is it all based on your own studies?
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2019, 02:19:05 PM »
Wait to your line; adults are talking here.
Yes, we are the adults that are speaking (at least some of them).
Now will you start acting like an adult, or will you continue to act like a spoilt child demanding their way?

Actually it has a ver few blue color because of oxygen, but we can not aware it.
No, it doesn't.
Colours don't work that way. You don't have elements having colour and then combine the elements to produce molecules that have the colours of the elements.
The colours are based upon absorption bands of the molecules.


water is not only in h2o format. it generally contains free oxygen, ozone and free hydrogen.
No it doesn't.
By definition, water is a molecule of H2O. Anything else is not water.
Yes, a large sample of water will likely have some dissolved gasses, but those gasses are not the water itself.

But again, all this is just a pathetic distraction to avoid your massive failure.
Again, if the sky was actually blue, for whatever reason you want to make up, then it would appear blue all the time, not just during the day. It would not appear red at sunset.
The sky appearing to have different colours at different times of day indicate it isn't actually blue.
Now are you going to address this, or will you just continue with your wilful ignorance and childish BS?

*

rabinoz

  • 22561
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2019, 02:27:55 PM »
Oh, sky is water; air isn't.  :) Sky, is the thing we define as "dome".
No, the sky is not water. The sky is air (predominantly 78% nitrogen gas and 21% oxygen gas) with a trace (under 1% to 4%) of water vapour (NOT WATER)!

Quote from: wise
Sea is water, simple water. You can see even pool water as blue many times. The water in h20 format is "about colorless". Actually it has a ver few blue color because of oxygen, but we can not aware it. But temperature, other elements, and other reasons, water is not only in h2o format. it generally contains free oxygen, ozone and free hydrogen.
Water is H20 nothing else! Sea-water typically has about 3.5% salt (NaCl) by weight plus traces of numerous other metals.
Quote from: wise
Main colour of oxygen is blue when it in liquid format. Inother say, free oxygen gives its color to water which has not color as main shape. And water has slightly blue because of Oxygen in H2O. Both Oxygen in water and free oxygen give their color; blue to the water.
Yes, water is blue when there enough depth BUT that has nothing whatsoever to do with the sky being blue.
That is caused by a completely different process, Rayleigh Scattering.
Strangely enough that Rayleigh Scattering also is the cause of orange and red sunrises, sunsets and lunar eclipses.

If the sky gets its blue colour from water please explain why sunsets are usually red, as in these:
Time lapse of a sunset:

Hawaii Sunset with Green Flash, Natalie Sirgo
      And the last bit of the sun disappearing:

PACIFIC OCEAN SUNSET...Mardoval

Then finally a couple of stills of the sun setting over the ocean at Weipa in Queensland:

Sun near setting at Weipa
               

Sunset at Weipa

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2019, 10:48:09 AM »
When the sun is in different positions as compared to you on the globe, the sun hits different water droplets in the atmosphere differently, causing the refraction of light and therefore the appearance of different colors of light, making a sunset. This is the explanation used for all schools of thought, I don't see why it would differ.

?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2019, 01:12:43 PM »
When the sun is in different positions as compared to you on the globe, the sun hits different water droplets in the atmosphere differently, causing the refraction of light and therefore the appearance of different colors of light, making a sunset. This is the explanation used for all schools of thought, I don't see why it would differ.

Is in FET the sun light travel distance through the atmosphere comparable to RET? Thought it might be shorter. So, is it long enough to scatter the red part of the sun light spectrum in a large enough fraction? But I admit there are more obvious debunks.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 01:16:31 PM by Souleon »
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2019, 06:56:29 PM »
Water is not colorless, it is blue.
"Scientist" Wise sets a new record for saying the dumbest thing.

?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2019, 11:40:03 PM »
Water is not colorless, it is blue.
"Scientist" Wise sets a new record for saying the dumbest thing.

Actually this one is true. And also not dumb, since water in a glass appears colorless.


"This absorption spectrum of water (red light absorbs 100 times more than blue light), together with the five-times greater scattering of blue light over red light, contributes to the blue color of lake, river and ocean waters."

Source: http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/water/water_vibrational_spectrum.html

And even sky is partly blue because of water, but not because water is blue. :D
(I'm not trolling.)
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 11:54:30 PM by Souleon »
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2019, 06:15:21 AM »
Actually this one is true. And also not dumb, since water in a glass appears colorless.
Umm -- we say grass is green because it "appears" to be green.  We say water is colorless because it "appears" to be colorless.  That's what color is -- how it appears to the eye.

Like you said -- "water in a glass appears colorless".  Water is colorless.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2019, 04:31:19 PM »
Umm -- we say grass is green because it "appears" to be green.  We say water is colorless because it "appears" to be colorless.  That's what color is -- how it appears to the eye.
Not quite.
Things are coloured for one of 2 reasons.
Either they emit light of a particular wavelength (or combination thereof), giving them a colour, or because they absorb light of a particular wavelength (or combination thereof), giving them a colour.
It is not simply the colour it appears.
For example, if you take a red light and shine it on a white piece of paper, the paper doesn't become red even though it appears red.

Scattering makes it more complicated, as if they scatter some wavelengths preferentially then the substance can appear one colour from one direction and another colour from another direction. In that case, neither of the colours is necessarily what is deemed to be the colour of the object.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #24 on: May 11, 2019, 05:30:25 PM »
Although most of the blue we see when we look at oceans is reflected from the sky, it is true that water is actually very very slightly blue.

As much as it pains me to agree with Wise on anything.


Re: Sky colors
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2019, 07:03:23 PM »
You guys are confusing spectral content with color (yes I know, they are related). 

Color exists only in the mind's eye.  The relative intensity of light impinging the three different type of sensors in the retina is processed by the brain to provide the color one sees.

You will never "see" a glass of blue water or a blue raindrop. While technically there may be a tiny variation in the intensities of various portions of the spectrum of light hitting the retina when viewing a glass of water illuminated by diffuse "white" light, you won't see blue water.

The water will appear colorless. And how it appears, defines the "color". So, certainly in the sense that Wise is using the term, water is colorless.

?

Souleon

  • 101
  • Truth interested
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2019, 07:33:37 PM »
You guys are confusing spectral content with color (yes I know, they are related). 

Color exists only in the mind's eye.  The relative intensity of light impinging the three different type of sensors in the retina is processed by the brain to provide the color one sees.

You will never "see" a glass of blue water or a blue raindrop. While technically there may be a tiny variation in the intensities of various portions of the spectrum of light hitting the retina when viewing a glass of water illuminated by diffuse "white" light, you won't see blue water.

The water will appear colorless. And how it appears, defines the "color". So, certainly in the sense that Wise is using the term, water is colorless.

We define colors also via wavelengths, which can be measured by sensors also.
And, if you line up enough water-filled glasses, you will also see the blue color.
Facts that can be explained logically by FET and not by RE: None.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2019, 12:55:44 AM »
You will never "see" a glass of blue water or a blue raindrop. While technically there may be a tiny variation in the intensities of various portions of the spectrum of light hitting the retina when viewing a glass of water illuminated by diffuse "white" light, you won't see blue water.

The water will appear colorless. And how it appears, defines the "color". So, certainly in the sense that Wise is using the term, water is colorless.
Likewise, if you get a small enough amount of anything (assuming it doesn't emit light) it will appear colourless. Just because the colour is not intense doesn't mean it isn't coloured.

Re: Sky colors
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2019, 05:08:17 AM »
Color is not defined by wavelength.  There is, for example, no firm scientific definition of Blue. Yes, there is a range of wavelengths that most eyes will interpret as blue, and that is generally accepted as blue.  But blue to you and blue to me might not even look the same; it is impossible to know.  Wavelengths are specific numbers and can be precisely measured.  Colors are not so firmly defined or so exactly measurable.

I'm not basically disagreeing with you guys anyway, and really don't mean to be getting this thread way off topic by taking it over-technical. If you were looking through a mile of still water, sure, it would have a blue tint.  But in any practical sense, water is colorless.

*

wise

  • Professor
  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 18610
  • Backstage
Re: Sky colors
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2019, 11:03:33 PM »
Water is not colorless, it is blue.
"Scientist" Wise sets a new record for saying the dumbest thing.

Is it "dumbest" an argument? Reported for insulting. It is a good example how angry globularists use insulting as an argument here.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing