how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite

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how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« on: March 04, 2019, 08:17:02 PM »
Satellite dishes are very directional, and each signal id's itself.




DirecTV will tell you the angle to point your highly directional antenna at a satellite (or ??? on FE).

https://www.directv.com/DTVAPP/customer/dishPointer

So we have a pointer to the satellite that we can truth check and a web page that will tell us the angles without equipment or going anywhere. Let's see what the deal with this is on FE. All math is FE, no curvature correction. I do like the ease of calculation on a cartesian plane without that pesky curvature. RE is harder.

The one transmitter case:

The DirecTV web page gives satellite elevation in Grand Forks ND as 35 degrees, Brownsville TX is 59.4. The 1500 mi distance and a triangle calculator gives an altitude of 1778 mi. This is far above the capability of balloons or stratalites, I would think.

Been down this road with GPS, I will need to discuss the multi-transmitter case:

So by FE logic, there must be multiple transmitters. Taking 40 mi as a very generous altitude for balloons or stratalites, this gives the position of the stratalite/balloon/??? as 57 mi south of Grand Forks and 23.6 mi south of Brownsville. Hope no ground cables necessary to hold balloons in position. A balloon at this distance with the directionality of a dish could be a problem, better hold them stationary this close. A mile equals a degree at 40 mi altitude.

How many will we need? I calculate the ground distance for a 1 degree error in Brownsville would be 0.9 mi. You are going to need a transmitter every .9 mi, or the angle will be wrong. You can use fewer transmitters, but the angles will get worse. Someone is going to notice there are signals in every direction for the same satellite, including satellites north of you that are published as being at the equator. Or miraculously directional antennas, trouble at the equidistant point with interference anyway.

Bunch of new problems, multiple transmitters a mile apart broadcasting same signal. Many many transmitters need to be synchronized. Plus, I have only considered elevation. To include azimuth, you are going to need many many many transmitters, a grid a mile apart, they all need to be synchronized perfectly. I calculate you will need 3,000,000 transmitters to give everyone in USA an angle that is less than 1 degree off.

Incredibly expensive engineering nightmare. And the installers are going to notice that there are multiple signals at slightly different angles. FEs say they won't notice (because they have to not notice for the FE story), but they will. Engineers try every knob and switch, point things in every direction, like a kid with a techno toy, that's how we roll.

Any FE Rube Goldberg explanations? Seems like this is publicly available verifiable confirmation that the DirecTV transmitter is where they say it is, transmitter is 22,000 miles above the equator in geostationary orbit. Once again, the simple direct explanation is RE and satellites, as published. I hope I get some doozies. Probably 0 replies.







« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 11:17:48 PM by jimster »
Is it possible for something to be both true and unproven?

Are things that are true and proven any different from things that are true but not proven?

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2019, 06:29:55 AM »
The very definition of a strawman. Invent a position your opponent does not hold and then demolish it. (More material devoted to debunking your invented non-existent opposition than anything else. But that's to be expected from a constant irritant that has started more topics than he has replied to.)

I think I heard somewhere once postulate that the transmitters were embedded in the dome. That seems like something wise would say.

Sorry to disappoint you about the no replies thing. I know how much you like feeling superior with your hit-and-run topics.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 12:37:57 PM by Curiouser and Curiouser »

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2019, 07:31:01 PM »
If you plot the direction they tell you to point the satellite from multiple points, those lines will intersect. When I did this with assumption of US is flat plane from two points, Grand Forks ND and Brownsville TX, the intersection was 1770 mi above earth. This is far above any known plane or balloon. Somehow, without a geostationary satellite, you have to have a transmitter held up at 1770 miles to have it be on axis to both dishes.

Didn't prove the earth isn't flat, I proved that if the transmitter is not at 1770 mi, the people in either Grand Forks or Brownsville will not get a signal when they point as DirecTV tells them.

It will completely fail if you do azimuth or add a third zip code, no intersection at all unles it is over the equator of a round earth at 22,000 mi. in geostationary orbit.

Even multiple transmitters won't help you. They would have to be perfectly synchronized because you will get bleed all over the place. High frequency digital signals slightly unsynchronized will make garbage. And people will be at the equidistant from two transmitters, and these are geostationary, so the error doesn't move like gps.

In the video, the guy has a signal indicator that squeals when he has a signal. If there were many transmitters in slightly different places, when he moved the dish around, he would get squeals all over the place, and he doesn't. Giving everyone a signal in the direction from the web site is going to require a grid of transmitters a mile apart. Not practical to hold things up stationary above the atmosphere, not practical to synchronize, and anyone who has a DirecTV dish and one of those squeal boxes can point it all over the sky and discover way too many txmtrs.

Again, these devices are available to the general public.

I wish we could conference call to a gps or DirecTV engineer who could address your concepts and explain authoritatively why you faux satellites won't work. Also a hf antenna engineer for your schemes requiring a sharp cutoff at the edge of the signal. Maybe they are in the conspiracy?

Unless you can have geostationary satellites at 22,000 mi orbit on FE, you have to explain where they are and how they stay up and how everyone gets a signal only in the direction DirecTV publishes.
Is it possible for something to be both true and unproven?

Are things that are true and proven any different from things that are true but not proven?

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Danang

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2019, 01:59:49 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.
TRY: (Curved Grided) South Pole Centered FE Map AKA Phew FE Map and Downwards Universal Deceleration.

Phew's Silicon Valley: https://gwebanget.home.blog/

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Stash

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2019, 02:17:21 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.

How do the transponders get embedded in the dome? Seemingly a simple question.
No. That sudden lurch forwards is the atmospheric slosh effect.

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2019, 02:22:18 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.
This video shows why your claim that the transponders are on the dome doesn't work.

Since it costs 1.82 to produce a penny, putting in your 2 if really worth 3.64.

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Danang

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2019, 07:00:53 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.

How do the transponders get embedded in the dome? Seemingly a simple question.

By helicopter as I once saw it on Youtube.
IMHO the rocket launching may be a drama, but the transponder is real.
TRY: (Curved Grided) South Pole Centered FE Map AKA Phew FE Map and Downwards Universal Deceleration.

Phew's Silicon Valley: https://gwebanget.home.blog/

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Danang

  • 3827
  • Everything will be "Phew" in its time :')
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2019, 07:04:05 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.
This video shows why your claim that the transponders are on the dome doesn't work.



It take only a Phew FE Map to figure out the description.
TRY: (Curved Grided) South Pole Centered FE Map AKA Phew FE Map and Downwards Universal Deceleration.

Phew's Silicon Valley: https://gwebanget.home.blog/

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faded mike

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2019, 10:07:27 AM »
Jimster, don't you believe they might have advanced secret tech?
" Using our vast surveillance system, we've uncovered revolutionary new information..."
           -them

I am not a druggy

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faded mike

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2019, 10:23:11 AM »
Maybe the whole purpose of the sattelite tv boom was to ingrain the globe mentality. Think about it, modern tv is a scam, you got some one comeing on and lying: "I love such and such prodcut, it really makes me feel like myself again"  for every 8 minutes out of 30.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 10:25:08 AM by faded mike »
" Using our vast surveillance system, we've uncovered revolutionary new information..."
           -them

I am not a druggy

*

Stash

  • 4857
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2019, 11:18:25 AM »
Maybe the whole purpose of the sattelite tv boom was to ingrain the globe mentality. Think about it, modern tv is a scam, you got some one comeing on and lying: "I love such and such prodcut, it really makes me feel like myself again"  for every 8 minutes out of 30.

Doesn't answer the question of why we point our dishes where we do.
No. That sudden lurch forwards is the atmospheric slosh effect.

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faded mike

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2019, 11:36:01 AM »
Sorry i got kindof excited and just wanted to add that. But I don't believe there is no way past this problem.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 11:38:14 AM by faded mike »
" Using our vast surveillance system, we've uncovered revolutionary new information..."
           -them

I am not a druggy

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Bullwinkle

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2019, 10:55:34 PM »

The DirecTV web page gives satellite elevation in Grand Forks ND as 35 degrees, Brownsville TX is 59.4. The 1500 mi distance and a triangle calculator gives an altitude of 1778 mi. This is far above the capability of balloons or stratalites, I would think.

Perhaps they aren't pointing at the same target?

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rabinoz

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2019, 12:39:07 AM »

The DirecTV web page gives satellite elevation in Grand Forks ND as 35 degrees, Brownsville TX is 59.4. The 1500 mi distance and a triangle calculator gives an altitude of 1778 mi. This is far above the capability of balloons or stratalites, I would think.
Perhaps they aren't pointing at the same target?
Did you miss this bit?
Satellite dishes are very directional, and each signal id's itself.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2019, 01:33:16 AM »

Did you miss this bit?

Satellite dishes are very directional, and each signal id's itself.

No, I did not miss that bit. Thanks for asking.

Back when I used to steal DirecTV,
you just pointed the dish until you got the loudest whistle on your TV.

Not very precise at all. 

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rabinoz

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2019, 02:06:42 AM »

Did you miss this bit?

Satellite dishes are very directional, and each signal id's itself.

No, I did not miss that bit. Thanks for asking.

Back when I used to steal DirecTV,
you just pointed the dish until you got the loudest whistle on your TV.

Not very precise at all.
Most dishes used these days have beam-widths of only a degree or so.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2019, 02:16:25 AM »

Did you miss this bit?

Satellite dishes are very directional, and each signal id's itself.

No, I did not miss that bit. Thanks for asking.

Back when I used to steal DirecTV,
you just pointed the dish until you got the loudest whistle on your TV.

Not very precise at all.
Most dishes used these days have beam-widths of only a degree or so.

And you gotta pay them every month.
No more writing code to put $600 on the ATMEL card for PPV.   :(

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2019, 02:36:17 AM »
Haha, a dome studded with TV thousand of transmitters, hilarious. The sky would be awash with the signals leaking out of imprecisely adjusted dishes. Some would fail so the satellite would appear to work only for people in certain locations (explain that!). Rockets would be constantly launching replacements and engineers.

That's the easy stuff with geostationary satellites, what about the ones that move across the sky but transmit to the public (eg, iridium) ... are they on rails bolted to the dome? Imagine building and running that! Each "satellite" would need multiple rails to carry each transmitter required to fake it's position in the sky from different latitudes.

I see spacex will be sending up 4500+ new broadband satellites, that's quite a task even in the real world, but in FE world.... all the extra rails that will need building!
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

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Bullwinkle

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2019, 02:56:05 AM »
. . . what about the ones that move across the sky but transmit to the public (eg, iridium) ... are they on rails bolted to the dome? Imagine building and running that! Each "satellite" would need multiple rails to carry each transmitter required to fake it's position in the sky from different latitudes.

You probably put a great deal of thought into that.

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2019, 04:54:09 AM »
. . . what about the ones that move across the sky but transmit to the public (eg, iridium) ... are they on rails bolted to the dome? Imagine building and running that! Each "satellite" would need multiple rails to carry each transmitter required to fake it's position in the sky from different latitudes.

You probably put a great deal of thought into that.

Not really, it's ridiculous but it's still better thought out than most FE theories. Perhaps you'd like to constructively critique it rather then adding a low content post to higher board?
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

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Mikey T.

  • 2419
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2019, 05:57:25 AM »
Such fail.  I may try to explain how satellite signals work again to show you how stupid this dome studded transmitter idea is, but most of you flat earfers would just scream and poke your fingers in your ears

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2019, 05:52:36 PM »
Today, I just figured out your estimate of the quantity needed to cover a 1 degree XY pattern, for the dish to have a good signal. Good job.
And you should see them in the sky in that pattern, but I only see one row of them at 23,000 miles away.
Also what happens when the dish points at one of the others? They can't have too many frequencies or polarization to keep the dish from seeing the others.
The mulitbeam method they use on real GEO satellites, points at an area, but how does millions of balloons, keep pointed to their 1 degree spot on the earth in the wind?
The Flat solution has many more problems.
Astronomer, photographer, and astro-photographer for 51 years. Satellite observer for 3 years, satellite builder in the 80's. Telescope maker and familiar with optical theory and designs. Machinists and machine tool programmer.

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2019, 01:14:58 AM »
Transponders are put at the dome.

Satellites, Google baloons don't make sense.

LEO transponders have to move to simulate a satellite moving across the sky.

I imagine there are a series of tracks like rollercoaster tracks fixed to the dome which the satellites can roll along. You'd need a separate track for nearly every satellite with bridges everywhere they cross. You'd need many many technicians to maintain it. No one's ever dropped anything. The tracks are invisible. Satellites never get stuck and stop moving.
The Universal Accelerator is a constant farce.

Flattery will get you nowhere.

From the FAQ - "In general, we at the Flat Earth Society do not lend much credibility to photographic evidence."

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kopfverderber

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Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2019, 01:26:16 AM »
Maybe angels are moving the transponders around, either that or the tooth fairy.
You must gather your party before venturing forth

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2019, 07:33:52 PM »
And you can see them only in a single row.
Off from the 0 deg declination, by the correct amount depending on your latitude, for something that is 23,000 miles over the equator.

Even with a small telescope.
Or put your cell phone up to binoculars, then take 8 time images.
Then stack them.

(Admin: How do I attach images, from my PC?)
(They were all on Goggle+, but that went away.)
Astronomer, photographer, and astro-photographer for 51 years. Satellite observer for 3 years, satellite builder in the 80's. Telescope maker and familiar with optical theory and designs. Machinists and machine tool programmer.

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Macarios

  • 2028
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2019, 09:22:48 PM »
(Admin: How do I attach images, from my PC?)
(They were all on Goggle+, but that went away.)

The easiest way is to open Resim Yukle(click here) host (so it won't get censored in, say, Turkey), upload the image, copy the second link and put it here inside IMG tag.

It looks something like this (click on the image to enlarge):



IMG tag also allows resizing like

Code: [Select]
[img width=600]link here[/img]
(Ofcourse, if your image is already on the Internet, you can use link to there, won't have to host it additionally.)


EDIT: Before this I was using Tiny Pic Host, but some members couldn't see the images hosted there.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 09:29:50 PM by Macarios »
I don't have to fight about anything.
These things are not about me.
When one points facts out, they speak for themselves.
The main goal in all that is simplicity.

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #26 on: August 24, 2019, 09:11:33 AM »
Thanks, but that sounds to obscure site to me.
I was hoping I could just download from my PC, like Twitter allows.
Astronomer, photographer, and astro-photographer for 51 years. Satellite observer for 3 years, satellite builder in the 80's. Telescope maker and familiar with optical theory and designs. Machinists and machine tool programmer.

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Macarios

  • 2028
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #27 on: August 24, 2019, 08:04:38 PM »
Thanks, but that sounds to obscure site to me.
I was hoping I could just download from my PC, like Twitter allows.

This forum doesn't host images, it just shows them from url you provide.
I don't have to fight about anything.
These things are not about me.
When one points facts out, they speak for themselves.
The main goal in all that is simplicity.

*

rabinoz

  • 26295
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #28 on: August 24, 2019, 09:21:33 PM »
Thanks, but that sounds to obscure site to me.
I was hoping I could just download from my PC, like Twitter allows.

This forum doesn't host images, it just shows them from url you provide.
I don't know if is "recommended" but I've linked to images posted by others on Twitter and I don't even have a Twitter account.
Here's one:

  • On my computer I just right-click the picture in Twitter and a menu showing "Copy image address" shows. Paste this as below.

  • On my Samsung Galaxy tablet I had to "touch" the picture until a menu showed then selected "open image in new tab".
    The "url line" that shows in that tab is the url of the picture, so paste the url into  [img]<< Picture url >>[/img].
The above picture had " width=400" added to save space so was the following before posting:
      "[img width=400]https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ECoZ-FHU0AMz0oZ?format=jpg&name=900x900[/img]"

PS Be warned! This post will look like a (more  ::)) indecipherable mess if you try to "[quote][/quote] it" ;D

Re: how to know the altitude of a DirecTV satelite
« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2019, 04:10:52 AM »
Thanks, but that sounds to obscure site to me.
I was hoping I could just download from my PC, like Twitter allows.

This forum doesn't host images, it just shows them from url you provide.
I don't know if is "recommended" but I've linked to images posted by others on Twitter and I don't even have a Twitter account.
Here's one:

  • On my computer I just right-click the picture in Twitter and a menu showing "Copy image address" shows. Paste this as below.

  • On my Samsung Galaxy tablet I had to "touch" the picture until a menu showed then selected "open image in new tab".
    The "url line" that shows in that tab is the url of the picture, so paste the url into  [img]<< Picture url >>[/img].
The above picture had " width=400" added to save space so was the following before posting:
      "[img width=400]https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ECoZ-FHU0AMz0oZ?format=jpg&name=900x900[/img]"

PS Be warned! This post will look like a (more  ::)) indecipherable mess if you try to "[quote][/quote] it" ;D

Thanks, I will try my twitter, but my images are spread all over there, would take time to find them, it maybe easier to send a dumb reposte of them in twitter, then copy and paste the url to here.
Astronomer, photographer, and astro-photographer for 51 years. Satellite observer for 3 years, satellite builder in the 80's. Telescope maker and familiar with optical theory and designs. Machinists and machine tool programmer.