Collection of Dates

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Collection of Dates
« on: January 25, 2019, 12:07:24 PM »
OP's note: I regularly make posts (example 1 (2014), example 2 (2016)) containing a collection of dates so that we can all keep tabs on the big promises that space companies are making. Most dates come and go but a few milestones do occasionally happen along the way. This is in FEG because it is related to The Conspiracy and some of it you can witness the action or fakery yourself if you plan ahead (SpaceX rocket landings for example).
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2018 recap

What didn't happen:

  • SpaceX to send Dragon 2 to Mars or the Moon
  • Blue Origin sending first customers to space.
  • James Webb Space Telescope
  • The first Crew Dragon - Humans to ISS via SpaceX rocket
  • Mars One uncrewed mission to Mars
  • Mars One crew training (still listed on their website)

What did happen

  • Falcon Heavy + car in space
  • Virgin Galactic reached space (suggested by Stash)

What's on the horizon (I'm sure there's more I could add to this list)

« Last Edit: January 25, 2019, 03:37:44 PM by FlatOrange »
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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2019, 12:56:45 PM »
Mars One is not a space company. While the internet went berserk over its grandiose and alluring plans, the progress they made was infinitessimal. Their plans slipped year for year. Most now regard it as a scam to sell merch.

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2019, 01:03:01 PM »

What did happen

  • Falcon Heavy + car in space


So that's the only thing?

21 launches, 14 attempted booster landings with an 85% success rate seems worth mentioning.

Unless, you know, you have a reason for downplaying it.

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2019, 02:38:42 PM »

What did happen

  • Falcon Heavy + car in space


So that's the only thing?

21 launches, 14 attempted booster landings with an 85% success rate seems worth mentioning.

Unless, you know, you have a reason for downplaying it.

Not trying to downplay it at all; just trying to make a concise list about space-travel milestones. What I mean by space-travel milestones, is that these are not feats of engineering (landing a rocket on a barge for example), these are directly related to the future of space travel and its promises.

Think of it this way. What milestones will really get a flat-earther/moon-landing-denier ruffled up? Compare landing on a barge in the ocean to landing on the moon. It's incomparable. If we're looking to the space traveling future, I want to list the milestones that are like: flying around the moon, commercial company launching humans to space, new telescopes in space that can observe far distant galaxies, etc. I don't want to list every time SpaceX or Blue Origin lands a rocket. Yes, it's impressive as an engineering feat, but it's not really a space-travel milestone.
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Stash

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2019, 02:46:00 PM »
Here are some more (I think they all fit the criteria):

- NASA's InSight lands on Mars
- Parker Solar Probe launches to "touch" the sun
- Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched (Space X)
- China lander launchers to the moon's far side
- Japan's Hayabusa2 arrives at Ryugu
- NASA's OSIRIS-REx arrives at asteroid Bennu
- Voyager 2 reaches interstellar space
- Virgin Galactic reaches space
- European-Japanese BepiColombo mission launch to Mercury

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sokarul

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2019, 03:36:14 PM »
Maybe add this?

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/startup-wants-put-huge-ads-space-not-everyone-board-idea-ncna960296

That's good. Pretty contentious though so no dates to pencil in at this point.

Here are some more (I think they all fit the criteria):

- NASA's InSight lands on Mars
- Parker Solar Probe launches to "touch" the sun
- Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched (Space X)
- China lander launchers to the moon's far side
- Japan's Hayabusa2 arrives at Ryugu
- NASA's OSIRIS-REx arrives at asteroid Bennu
- Voyager 2 reaches interstellar space
- Virgin Galactic reaches space
- European-Japanese BepiColombo mission launch to Mercury

Okay... while I agree these are all impressive, to a flat-earther it just looks like another chapter in the same ol' money-generating space story. Another thing landed on Mars. What's different this time? New mission objectives. To flat-earthers it's just a story they're weaving. There's nothing that really distinguishes it from Curiosity, you know? You can argue for the new science, but think of it from the perspective of someone that thinks it's all bs.

Voyager 2 reached interstellar space. Yeah? So? Voyager 1 did that. Is the story any different? No. Again, to space geeks, this is another huge feat, but to an outsider, it's just the same bs.

Virgin Galactic is one I totally should add and will add to the list. This is a regular company, not owned by the govt. While "space" AKA the Karman Line, is arguable, it is notable. The rest, I hope you can see my argument, looks like a series of drivel from a CGI company weaving a wild web of lies.

What things do we have to look forward to that will make even a fictional story exciting? Think bigger than rocket landings, rocket explosions, rockets falling over from 50mph Texas winds, etc.
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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2019, 10:59:51 AM »

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2019, 06:02:17 PM »
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Ski

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2019, 07:39:59 PM »
Another space scam circles the drain...


You guys forgot Elon making a Rt66-style roadside attraction in your list of events:


Seems very sturdy and safe...

https://www.ksat.com/news/high-winds-blow-over-damage-spacex-rocket-in-rio-grande-valley


"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 10:28:35 AM »
Another space scam circles the drain...


You guys forgot Elon making a Rt66-style roadside attraction in your list of events:


Seems very sturdy and safe...

https://www.ksat.com/news/high-winds-blow-over-damage-spacex-rocket-in-rio-grande-valley


This rocket is on the roadmap to their dearmoon mission. I didn't think it was significant enough on its own to mention. I would love to hear your thoughts. I'm trying to only talk about stuff that will light a flame for new debates and such.

If this rocket flies will you be in shock? Elon tweeted that it could fly by Saturday, March 2, 2019.
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Ski

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 10:30:38 AM »
Define "flies".
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2019, 11:13:21 AM »
Define "flies".
Propelling and sustaining itself in the air for a meaningful duration.

A common drone is capable of flying up 500 meters, so I'd say this rocket should at least do 500 meters. It's "cleared" for flight up to 5000 meters.
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John Davis

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 11:49:07 AM »
It looks as if you tied a string to it, it might serve as a decent kite if that's what you are asking.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2019, 11:53:08 AM »
It looks as if you tied a string to it, it might serve as a decent kite if that's what you are asking.
The physics of how a kite flies versus how a rocket flies will reveal itself through footage of the event. I'm hoping it "flies" in one form or another by summer.
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Stash

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2019, 12:03:34 PM »
Whether this Buck Rogers-esque prototype will fly is yet to be seen. But interesting science behind the choice of stainless steel over other materials.


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John Davis

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2019, 01:01:13 PM »
It looks as if you tied a string to it, it might serve as a decent kite if that's what you are asking.
The physics of how a kite flies versus how a rocket flies will reveal itself through footage of the event. I'm hoping it "flies" in one form or another by summer.
I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation. That and apparently it was knocked over by the wind.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2019, 01:03:10 PM »
It looks as if you tied a string to it, it might serve as a decent kite if that's what you are asking.
The physics of how a kite flies versus how a rocket flies will reveal itself through footage of the event. I'm hoping it "flies" in one form or another by summer.
I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation. That and apparently it was knocked over by the wind.
Yes, the sputniks and satellites that transmit TV to our dishes.

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Ski

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2019, 01:03:28 PM »
Already had its first brief flight. Quite an achievement.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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Stash

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2019, 01:06:15 PM »
It looks as if you tied a string to it, it might serve as a decent kite if that's what you are asking.
The physics of how a kite flies versus how a rocket flies will reveal itself through footage of the event. I'm hoping it "flies" in one form or another by summer.
I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation. That and apparently it was knocked over by the wind.

Seems like wind can be a powerful thing:


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rabinoz

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2019, 02:46:14 PM »
Whether this Buck Rogers-esque prototype will fly is yet to be seen. But interesting science behind the choice of stainless steel over other materials.


Stainless steel might be strong and heat resistant but is very heavy, so very thin skins are used and it not properly supported can do this ;D:

ATLAS AGENA ROCKET DEPRESSURIZES ON PAD,
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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2019, 08:24:38 AM »

I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation.


It's a good thing that performance has nothing to do with how aesthetically pleasing a piece of equipment is.

That criterion is reserved for the realm of science fiction television shows and movies, where appearance is paramount -- and also the place where John gets all his ideas and information about space technology.

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dutchy

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2019, 02:51:47 PM »
If only we preserved those ancient 1969 technologies.....
We would be on the moon in a nano second and use it as a stepping stone on our way to mars in order to colonise it.
Mars is ''what humans do'' ::)... try to create an environment to live, because we're so bored with this over populated, polluted, uninterresting ''earth'' allready.

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rabinoz

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2019, 08:47:44 PM »
If only we preserved those ancient 1969 technologies.....
The "technologies" have been preserved and all the design documents are still available but:
  • The production lines could not be preserved. They simply could not be practically "moth-balled".
    Those production lines had to revert to their original products like aircraft etc - money!

  • Many parts of the Saturn V and the Apollo craft were virtually hand made and did not exactly follow the plans.
    This "has to be" when so few copies were being made and this applied especially to the massive Rocketdyne F-1 engines.
    Each Rocketdyne F-1 engine was slightly different. But manufacturing methods have changed drastically over the intervening 50 years.
    The main loss there is the type of craftsmen who built those engines more or less by trial and error. Modern designs can use excellent computer simulation and take the design much further before building even prototypes.
    Then manufacturing techniques are so different with computer-aided-design and automated production.
    One company is "3-D printing" complete rocket engines, though only small ones.

    But as an exercise an equivalent of the F-1 engine has been designed though not yet fully built, as far as I know.
    Were you interested you might read:
    How NASA brought the monstrous F-1 “moon rocket” engine back to life The story of young engineers who resurrected an engine nearly twice their age.

  • Many materials have changed over that period, though this is probably a minor point.
  • Other technologies, such as computers and automation, have change so drastically that there is no way that the technologies over half a century old would be considered.
Quote from: dutchy
We would be on the moon in a nano second and use it as a stepping stone on our way to mars in order to colonise it.
That is total garbage!
The only reason moon missions did not continue was money, money, money! It was extremely expensive and still would be.
The money dried up - end of story!

Quote from: dutchy
Mars is ''what humans do'' ::)... try to create an environment to live, because we're so bored with this over populated, polluted, uninterresting ''earth'' allready.
I'm very doubtful about any large scale Martin settlement and think it would be a great waste of money.
Humans are such radiation sensitive squishy bags of mainly water that need so much in life support to much of a future in space - at least with current technology.
And radiation shielding problems on a many months long journey to Mars and indeterminate time on the surface is a whole new ballgame compared to a few days to the moon and back.

Also I seriously doubt migrating to another planet could ever be a solution to the population problem. That must be solved here on earth and that's that!

In closing, it's time you stopped pushing your silly "If only we preserved those ancient 1969 technologies" because there's no truth in it!
On that topic you might read Did NASA really lose the technology for going to the moon, If they did not why did they not land there again?
But I doubt that you'll bother.

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dutchy

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2019, 02:35:54 AM »
Rabinoz you talk rubbish as per usuall when adressing anything in relation to space.
They destroyed telemetry data in huge numbers containing the original moonlanding data.
But of course it was expensive and to re-use the tapes is logic in your universe.

Don Petitt says they destroyed the moonlanding technologies and it's a painfull process to built it back.
You claim every bit was preserved only difficulty is to re-built the assembly lines ....  what exactly should we call that uhhh ???
Time consuming ?, expensive ?
Don Pettit clearly says they lost and/or destroyed the the technologies to go back to the moon, otherwise it was his most favourable next event ( going back to the moon in a hypothetical nano second)

He isn't talking about a re-installation of certain production lines ready to materialise on all the known and preserved blue prints and data of all involved equipment of the Apollo program.
You are such a willfully denier of truth, clinging onto the most bizare and childish online explainations ( Don P. said it was painfull to rebuilt production lines) you are willing to swallow without any form of critical thinking left.

Please try to think for yourself for once about a single subject instead of immidiatly bowing for the altar of online info you eagerly try to copy and present as your own findings.... which they are clearly not.








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Stash

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2019, 03:04:45 AM »
Rabinoz you talk rubbish as per usuall when adressing anything in relation to space.
They destroyed telemetry data in huge numbers containing the original moonlanding data.
But of course it was expensive and to re-use the tapes is logic in your universe.

My understanding is that it was the telemetry tapes from Apollo 11 that had the hi-resolution video backup on them that were lost. Apparently that video capture data was at a higher resolution than NTSC televisions at the time. So if we had that today, we could have crisper video of Neil descending the ladder than we do. The missing hi res backup video tapes are not and have nothing to do with us not going back to the moon.

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John Davis

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2019, 10:48:36 AM »

I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation.


It's a good thing that performance has nothing to do with how aesthetically pleasing a piece of equipment is.

That criterion is reserved for the realm of science fiction television shows and movies, where appearance is paramount -- and also the place where John gets all his ideas and information about space technology.
Sure. But being able to withstand wind is pretty important to a rocket.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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Ski

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2019, 10:50:11 AM »
Particularly if you plan on filling it with energetic fuels, say... 
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2019, 12:12:08 PM »

I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation.


It's a good thing that performance has nothing to do with how aesthetically pleasing a piece of equipment is.

That criterion is reserved for the realm of science fiction television shows and movies, where appearance is paramount -- and also the place where John gets all his ideas and information about space technology.
Sure. But being able to withstand wind is pretty important to a rocket.

Sputniks are spacecraft, not rockets. Or don't you know the difference?

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John Davis

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Re: Collection of Dates
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2019, 12:13:51 PM »

I'm joking of course. It looks no better than those sputniks made out of cardboard, aluminum foil, duct tape, and insulation.


It's a good thing that performance has nothing to do with how aesthetically pleasing a piece of equipment is.

That criterion is reserved for the realm of science fiction television shows and movies, where appearance is paramount -- and also the place where John gets all his ideas and information about space technology.
Sure. But being able to withstand wind is pretty important to a rocket.

Sputniks are spacecraft, not rockets. Or don't you know the difference?
Its literally named Starship.
Quantum Ab Hoc