Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"

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wise

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The angular size can be calculated by an arctan formula:



When a ship moves further away, its appearent size decreases related the distance. And D (height) stays same.

When there is a wave, it incases the ship when their apparent size becomes equal.

So,

If we take a wave has d heigh and l distance from observation point, so it turns to:



Apparent sizes have to be equal:



Now we can work on an example:

A ship has 10 metres high
A wave far us 100 metre and it has a high of 1 metre

So;

The distance of ship disappearing behind a wave:

Our formula was:

D/L = d/l

So;

10 metres / X = 1 / 100 metres.

X=1000
So ship disappears in a thousand metres.

If ship becomes 20 metres high, it disappears a 2.000 metres far.

If we use a highness, for example we are also have a high, it increases our sight range by itself. We'll examine this situation later.

PS: This working has been created after examine zorbakim's working as a base and support if it.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

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wise

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Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 12:51:46 AM »
Calculating the maximum sight range:

Our eyes are not perfect so we are limited with a sight range. We can not notice objects have apparent size smaller than 0,00005°.

As a solve the problem of wave, we can use a high place. Whether if waves arrive 5 metres high, we can solve it by stay on an object more than 5 metres. But we can solve the problem we have not perfect eyes.

With a binoculars or not, our sight range is limited with our eye limit as follow shape:



One rod cells do not provide a sensitivity. We need a bunch of rod cells for aware the object. I take it as 10. More close estimate can be calculated by obversations. Anyways.

We can calculate our minimum sight range as:

1°/2000 cells , and it is equal to 0,0005°

So we can calculate the maximum distance we can observe of an object have 10 metres high.

D/L = tan a

10 metres / L? = tan 0.0005

>> so

L= 10/tan 0,0005 = 114591 metres
L= 114 kms.

It is related with sensitivity if your eye. Distance of it with binoculars is related with sensitivity if binoculars.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2019, 08:06:09 PM »
The angular size can be calculated by an arctan formula:



When a ship moves further away, its appearent size decreases related the distance. And D (height) stays same.

When there is a wave, it incases the ship when their apparent size becomes equal.

So,

If we take a wave has d heigh and l distance from observation point, so it turns to:



Apparent sizes have to be equal:



Now we can work on an example:

A ship has 10 metres high
A wave far us 100 metre and it has a high of 1 metre

So;

The distance of ship disappearing behind a wave:

Our formula was:

D/L = d/l

So;

10 metres / X = 1 / 100 metres.

X=1000
So ship disappears in a thousand metres.

If ship becomes 20 metres high, it disappears a 2.000 metres far.

If we use a highness, for example we are also have a high, it increases our sight range by itself. We'll examine this situation later.

PS: This working has been created after examine zorbakim's working as a base and support if it.

Would the said 10 meters high ship of the question disappear at a height of 1000 meters if it goes straight vertically up in the sky?

It will be easy to calculate the said distance of the disappearing of an object at the horizon if measured vertically for vision. What do you think?

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wise

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Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2019, 10:28:04 PM »
Would the said 10 meters high ship of the question disappear at a height of 1000 meters if it goes straight vertically up in the sky?

It will be easy to calculate the said distance of the disappearing of an object at the horizon if measured vertically for vision. What do you think?

It said 10 meters high ship of the question disappear at a distance of 1000 meters if it goes straight. Your suggestion looks nice. However, I can not see any of pictures for now, hence I can not say anything decicive about this issue, because of fetö the terrorist organization in our institutional structures have forbid me to enter many web pages. Thanks, this forum is still not forbid. how can I continue my work while suffering such pressure and torture? When I say this, people, including globalists, do not believe it and say that I am making excuses. no, how can you make the right decision in a screenshot like this? They prevent me from even seeing my own work! Can you look at it? I can not see even what formula I have wrote.



This is the only upload web page working in my office, a website named resimyukle.xyz even his name is suspicious and potentially recording by fetö intelligent agents. This is probably why they let me connect this upload web page.

In one hand we are working under torture of NASA backed FETÖ terrorist agents, on the other hand people expect us to work well. How can I do this? Sorry, I am not telling this as an excuse but it is really out of my accessibility for now. I hope one day our state will decide to really deal with the fetö and clean them up. I'm sorry.
The moment you are closest to victory is the moment you are most desperate. Take note of wise with you, not with them.



http://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing

Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2019, 12:51:48 PM »
Would the said 10 meters high ship of the question disappear at a height of 1000 meters if it goes straight vertically up in the sky?

It will be easy to calculate the said distance of the disappearing of an object at the horizon if measured vertically for vision. What do you think?

It said 10 meters high ship of the question disappear at a distance of 1000 meters if it goes straight. Your suggestion looks nice. However, I can not see any of pictures for now, hence I can not say anything decicive about this issue, because of fetö the terrorist organization in our institutional structures have forbid me to enter many web pages. Thanks, this forum is still not forbid. how can I continue my work while suffering such pressure and torture? When I say this, people, including globalists, do not believe it and say that I am making excuses. no, how can you make the right decision in a screenshot like this? They prevent me from even seeing my own work! Can you look at it? I can not see even what formula I have wrote.



This is the only upload web page working in my office, a website named resimyukle.xyz even his name is suspicious and potentially recording by fetö intelligent agents. This is probably why they let me connect this upload web page.

In one hand we are working under torture of NASA backed FETÖ terrorist agents, on the other hand people expect us to work well. How can I do this? Sorry, I am not telling this as an excuse but it is really out of my accessibility for now. I hope one day our state will decide to really deal with the fetö and clean them up. I'm sorry.

Sorry to hear. No idea but it seems you nestle somewhere in turkey which has issues currently due to sudden change in political turn. You might be watched for the purpose of the political stability in the whole country but your creative work is irrelevant to them. So don't worry. You can even be awarded if discovered something valuable. Hope things will settle down soon -

I just suggested the easiest way of disappearing of an object due to our vision when stumble upon your question

Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2019, 07:32:34 PM »
When there is a wave, it incases the ship when their apparent size becomes equal.
They don't just need to be equal, they need to be in the same direction.
As an extreme example, a wave to your left cannot conceal a ship to the right.

As such, your argument only applies in the case where your eyes are at sea level, with the wave then blocking the view.
If your eye level is 1.5 m, then the wave will always be down, but if Earth is flat with the ship reaching a height of 10 m above sea level, it will always be up (at least the top 8.5 m of it).

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EvolvedMantisShrimp

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Re: Calculating the distance of disappearing for a ship in "horizon"
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2019, 07:49:28 PM »
If your hypothesis is correct, it would be impossible to see a ship slip below the horizon from a point of reference higher than the waves in question.
Nullius in Verba