Why is moonlight cold?

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Why is moonlight cold?
« on: August 06, 2018, 02:20:21 PM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2018, 03:32:49 PM »
It's actually not.  Moonlight is just reflected sunlight.  Unlike when sunlight hits a mirror, most of the sunlight is absorbed on the moon.  The remaining reflected sunlight is not enough to maintain warming of the earth, thus the earth "cools".
Rabinoz RIP

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2018, 04:32:38 PM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)
The clear night sky is what is so cold, not the moonlight!

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17 November

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2018, 06:40:43 PM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)
The clear night sky is what is so cold, not the moonlight!
Well, Lane County Flat Earth Research in Eugene, Oregon got together on a clear night with a full moon in a public park with infrared thermometers which measure the surface temperatures of objects.

We took two at least two temperatures of each of each object: one in direct moonlight and the second in the shade.

The result was consistently that the part of any object in the shade was hotter than the area of the same object in the moonlight. I appreciate that groupís organiser as I was unaware of that hitherto.

And considering that, I donít have any respect for statements by anyone arguing moonlight is not cold which are devoid of any evidence.

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FalseProphet

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2018, 07:04:03 PM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)
The clear night sky is what is so cold, not the moonlight!
Well, Lane County Flat Earth Research in Eugene, Oregon got together on a clear night with a full moon in a public park with infrared thermometers which measure the surface temperatures of objects.

We took two at least two temperatures of each of each object: one in direct moonlight and the second in the shade.

The result was consistently that the part of any object in the shade was hotter than the area of the same object in the moonlight. I appreciate that groupís organiser as I was unaware of that hitherto.

And considering that, I donít have any respect for statements by anyone arguing moonlight is not cold which are devoid of any evidence.
Repeat the same experiment when there is no moon! You'll get the same results! The object in the shade is protected from the cool air and absorbs the heat stored in the material of the shade.

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2018, 07:08:18 PM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)
The clear night sky is what is so cold, not the moonlight!
Well, Lane County Flat Earth Research in Eugene, Oregon got together on a clear night with a full moon in a public park with infrared thermometers which measure the surface temperatures of objects.

We took two at least two temperatures of each of each object: one in direct moonlight and the second in the shade.
The result was consistently that the part of any object in the shade was hotter than the area of the same object in the moonlight. I appreciate that groupís organiser as I was unaware of that hitherto.

And considering that, I donít have any respect for statements by anyone arguing moonlight is not cold which are devoid of any evidence.
I dare you to try the same experiment with just one difference - a clear moonless night. I've done that many times.

I believe that your experiment was genuine with:
Quote
We took two at least two temperatures of each of each object: one in direct moonlight and the second in the shade.

The result was consistently that the part of any object in the shade was hotter than the area of the same object in the moonlight. I appreciate that groupís organiser as I was unaware of that hitherto.
But the "things shading" your "object", be they trees or roofs, are much less cold than the night sky.

Try measuring the temperature of a clear night sky using an IR thermometer, with or without the moon, and you will find it very low, often well below -20įC.
Then measure the temperature of the "things shading" your object and they will be at close to the current air temperature, say 5į to 20įC.

Hence the "shade" stops some of the heat from the test object being lost to the cold of outer space, only a few tens of kilometres up.
The clear night air only provides very limited protection.

And FalseProphet said the same thing in one sentence!
« Last Edit: August 06, 2018, 07:27:24 PM by rabinoz »

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2018, 08:14:52 PM »
In other words: "Just do the experiment in the dark"...

LOOOOLLL HA! HA! You guys crack me up. My sides hurt. Really. Thanks for that. You guys really should start a religious cult or something. "The Church of our lord and heavenly father Neil deGrasse Tyson". "If you have a minute, we would like to share our love of the pear shaped earth you..." LOL. Seriously though:

If you COMPARE THE MOONLIGHT TO THE AREA THAT IS SHADED FROM THE MOONLIGHT (you're still with me right? Haven't lost 'ya yet? Good). MOONLIGHT IS COLD.

It's not "some thing shading the moonlight which is like... another temperature or something like that". It's not "the wind" (lol). The moon is emitting COLD light. It's kind of hard to do the experiment in the dark though, since there isn't any moon... light... to do the experiment with (face palm).

Please continue though. I like to watch you guys trip over yourselves like the clowns you are. It's freaking hysterical.

So how does a rocket engine work in a vacuum? Give up? IT PUSHES AGAINST ITSELF! Wokka wokka wokka! (That wasn't Fozzy the Bear, it was actually a "scientific explanation" from NASA) LOL. Back to the cold moonlight though. I'll save that joke for another day. HA HA! (I love you guys BTW).

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sokarul

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2018, 08:27:59 PM »
What?

Light is electromagnetic radiation, which is energy. When that energy is added to an object, the objectís temperature rises.
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It's no slur if it's fact.

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2018, 08:38:26 PM »
If you COMPARE THE MOONLIGHT TO THE AREA THAT IS SHADED FROM THE MOONLIGHT (you're still with me right? Haven't lost 'ya yet? Good). MOONLIGHT IS COLD.
Now do exactly the same experiment on a night with no moon and see what you get.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
It's not "some thing shading the moonlight which is like... another temperature or something like that". It's not "the wind" (lol).
No it's not the wind.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
The moon is emitting COLD light.
If you get the same effect with just the cold night sky it is not caused by any "COLD light" from the moon.
They is no such thing as cold light of cold radiation.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
It's kind of hard to do the experiment in the dark though, since there isn't any moon... light... to do the experiment with (face palm).
Tough, because moonlight has nothing to do with the case.
I know I'm a terrible skeptic, but I'm afraid I do not accept "cooling" radiation,  there ain't no such thing.

There is quote a lot on this topic, with quite a bit in Flat Earth Follies: Moonlight is cold light.
It does seem strange that only flat earthers seem to make this claim.

Here is a video that aims a 17" telescope at the moon itself:

Moon temperature experiment thru a mirrored telescope. Joel Harris

So, having a good infra-red thermometer  (reads to 0.1C anyway), I thought that I would give it a go.
I had one end of a plank in the shade and one end expose to the sky and
sure enough under the open sky is was about 2C and under the shade up to 6C, maybe I've proved it!

I would not put a lot of weight into my rough set-up, but still it might mean something.

By the way, did I mention that it is a cold, perfectly clear moonless night!

Yes, at night the open sky is much colder than any shading material. All the shading material does is to stop some the heat from the object being lost by radiation to the cold sky.

Pointing the infra-red thermometer directly at the sky gave a temperature of -32C, just a might cold!

So I really have doubts that it is the moonlight doing the cooling.

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boydster

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2018, 08:59:43 PM »
PAPA LEGBA IS BACK!!!

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2018, 09:22:55 PM »
PAPA LEGBA IS BACK!!!
Nope, there's no cursing swearing and no Toodle Pip.

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sokarul

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2018, 09:53:30 PM »
I don't know, his lack of knowledge is papa legba like. Plus his first post was from 2016 and his second and third are from this thread.
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It's no slur if it's fact.

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2018, 10:08:05 PM »
Be sure to change the subject as fast as you can, because you're failing hard at this one kiddos.  ;D

Does that simple science experiment have you boys stumped? Can't figure out how to use a thermometer?

I thought this song may help:



You're theory of darkness being the same temperature as darkness is spot on. I'll give you that.

On a night with no moon your theory is foolproof. No moonlight to make any moonshadows PROVES moonlight is not cold. AHH HAAA!!!

(Is this thing on? thump thump thump...).

"If you get the same effect with just the cold night sky it is not caused by any "COLD light" from the moon.
They (There) is no such thing as cold light of cold radiation."

You have to have moonlight to have a moonshadow though... Shadows are super hard to make with no light source...

Again, darkness is the same temperature as darkness though. TOTALLY! You've got that theory down to foolproof levels.

NO you DON'T get the "same effect" from the "cold night sky". Moonshadows are WARMER than the moonlight (just like in the song... go listen to it again). Every. Single. Test. PROVES THIS.

The moon IS NOT emitting reflected light from the sun. The moon is emitting COLD LIGHT. Any 3rd grader with a thermometer and a little common sense (ie NOT you guys) can prove that.

NOW. When grown adults try to either deny or LIE about the completely UNDENIABLE results of a very simple science test that has been proven to be true all over the world, by all kinds of different people as many times as you can prove it. We have one of two conditions going on.

A.) People are in denial.
B.) People are LYING.

Which camp are you in?

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sokarul

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2018, 10:14:47 PM »
The lit side of the moon always points to the sun. Solar eclipses only happen durning new moon phase. Lunar eclipses only happen during full moon phase. Full moons always rise at sunset and set at sunrise.
Do I need to say more?
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2018, 10:50:46 PM »
The lit side of the moon always points to the sun. Solar eclipses only happen durning new moon phase. Lunar eclipses only happen during full moon phase. Full moons always rise at sunset and set at sunrise.
Do I need to say more?

Yea, why is moonlight cold? Say some more about that... LOL.

Provide an answer to that one first. THEN we can move on to why the lunar cycles are BACKWARDS from what they should be on a round earth and why there is that mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight.  :)

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dutchy

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2018, 12:47:49 AM »
It's actually not.  Moonlight is just reflected sunlight.  Unlike when sunlight hits a mirror, most of the sunlight is absorbed on the moon.  The remaining reflected sunlight is not enough to maintain warming of the earth, thus the earth "cools".
Luckily we had 1969 moonsuits, enhanced with (currently) unknown or Ďlostí technologies.
The moonís albedo is 0.136, so the direct impact of sunlight on the moonís surface and moonsuits must have been something extremely difficult to handle.
But vizors, goldfoil, wrinkled paper and lost technologies were combined (and renamed with fancy multi layered jargon) to handle the direct impact of sunlight without an atmosphere.

Strange that every other topic shows how rediculous those moonlanding claims really were/are.
There is simply no getting away from it, because each and every globe argument about earth, the sun and the moon directly disqualifies the 1969 claims as mere bedtime stories for enthousiastic early seventies SF loving kids.

 ;D ;D ;D
« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 12:50:17 AM by dutchy »

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2018, 12:49:43 AM »
The lit side of the moon always points to the sun. Solar eclipses only happen durning new moon phase. Lunar eclipses only happen during full moon phase. Full moons always rise at sunset and set at sunrise.
Do I need to say more?
Yea, why is moonlight cold? Say some more about that... LOL.
First: Moonlight is not cold.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
Provide an answer to that one first.
Answered.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
THEN we can move on to why the lunar cycles are BACKWARDS from what they should be on a round earth
Second: Lunar cycles are NOT backwards from what they should be on the Globe earth.
If you disagree,  please explain with good clear diagrams.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
and why there is that mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight.  :)
Third: If you claim thst there is any mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight because I've seen none.

March 6, 2017 at 16:29 EAST 8.3 days old Waxing Gibbous - taken from about 20 km S of Brisbane
Where is there any mysterious shadow on that daylight photo of the moon

If you disagree,  please show some photos with clear information about the location, date and time they were taken.

Now, please confirm that you are not a troll trying to make the flat earth look (more) ridiculous.

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2018, 12:55:12 AM »
It's actually not.  Moonlight is just reflected sunlight.  Unlike when sunlight hits a mirror, most of the sunlight is absorbed on the moon.  The remaining reflected sunlight is not enough to maintain warming of the earth, thus the earth "cools".
<< Totally irrelevant to the topic, the OP and the posts so far. >>
Try again with something relevant.

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dutchy

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2018, 01:00:09 AM »
It's actually not.  Moonlight is just reflected sunlight.  Unlike when sunlight hits a mirror, most of the sunlight is absorbed on the moon.  The remaining reflected sunlight is not enough to maintain warming of the earth, thus the earth "cools".
<< Totally irrelevant to the topic, the OP and the posts so far. >>
Try again with something relevant.
Trying to delete exhibit A ?

Go on and play some more with your thermometer in the dark....... 8)

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2018, 01:00:51 AM »
So I kept wondering where you're getting the thing about the moon not emitting cold light because it's "the night" (or maybe Papa Legba) doing it. Lol.


Moon Light Test Results - Full Moon & New Moon Compared

Let me explain this to you. I'll go slow so you millennials can keep up (You're adorable when you try to be smart BTW, I just wanna pinch your pudgy little cheeks).

From about 8:40-11:22, he does the same test that has been done thousands (if not millions) of times which proves (inadvertently for him) that moonlight is cold. In his test, the moonlight is about 7 degrees cooler than the moonshadow.

For the second part of the test, he measures the temperature with no moonlight. The test shows that the area exposed to the sky has a temperature of roughly 4 degrees cooler that the area that is not directly exposed (top of post vs. side of post).

His conclusion is that this test "proves" the moon does not emit cold light but rather, it's "the night" (or maybe Neil Degrasse Tyson) doing it. LOL. Let's put that into context for the millenials, shall we?

So if you did the same EXACT TEST with the SUN, it would "prove" that the sun doesn't emit HOT LIGHT? It's "the daytime" (or maybe Neil) doing it. If you put that little red dot on the ground under the shade of a tree and noted that it is COOLER than the ground exposed to the sunlight... it's not the sun doing it, it's "the daytime" doing it. Right? Right. Actually NO. BUZZ! WRONG.

The sun is hot. It emits warm light. You can prove it over and over again. It's a scientific fact that can be proven through hypothesis and experimentation every. Single. Time.

The same rule applies to the Moon.

The moon is cold. It emits cool light. You can prove it over and over again. It's a scientific fact that can be proven through hypothesis and experimentation every. Single. Time.

Red dot inside the moonshadow - warm. Red dot outside the moonshadow - cool. Red dot inside the moonshadow - warm. Red dot outside the moonshadow - cool. Red dot inside the moonshadow - warm. Red dot outside the moonshadow - cool. You should try it, it's fun. REALLY.

So where I'm I going with this?

What his little test did show me was that, just like the moon; SOMETHING ELSE UP THERE appears to be EMITTING COOL LIGHT AS WELL. Not as much as the moon does, but something else is too...

Shading an area from the night sky for a few minutes isn't going to block out "the night" LOL (I'm sorry, I keep picturing Neil running around with his little pear wand). It WILL block out something up in the sky that is emitting cool light though.



« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 01:05:05 AM by nnnoooiiissseee »

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2018, 01:08:18 AM »
Please tell me this is a joke
"And fyi, exploding air in the blood is an effect obsevred when deep sea divers rise too fast."

Themightykabool

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2018, 01:18:53 AM »
The lit side of the moon always points to the sun. Solar eclipses only happen durning new moon phase. Lunar eclipses only happen during full moon phase. Full moons always rise at sunset and set at sunrise.
Do I need to say more?
Yea, why is moonlight cold? Say some more about that... LOL.
First: Moonlight is not cold.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
Provide an answer to that one first.
Answered.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
THEN we can move on to why the lunar cycles are BACKWARDS from what they should be on a round earth
Second: Lunar cycles are NOT backwards from what they should be on the Globe earth.
If you disagree,  please explain with good clear diagrams.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
and why there is that mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight.  :)
Third: If you claim thst there is any mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight because I've seen none.

March 6, 2017 at 16:29 EAST 8.3 days old Waxing Gibbous - taken from about 20 km S of Brisbane
Where is there any mysterious shadow on that daylight photo of the moon

If you disagree,  please show some photos with clear information about the location, date and time they were taken.

Now, please confirm that you are not a troll trying to make the flat earth look (more) ridiculous.

This photo was apparently taken in the day time? Correct? OK. If you're standing on the Earth and the sun is HIGH UP IN THE SKY one side and the moon is HIGH UP IN THE SKY on the other side WHERE IS THE SHADOW COMING FROM? It sure isn't coming from the Earth. Do you need me to draw you a cartoon? If you have a BASIC understanding of how shadow work, you should be able to figure it out. I have faith in you.

Now back to the cold moonlight. You seem to have given up trying to spin your way out of that one I see... LOL.

It was nice of you to come to the defense of flat earthers BTW. You're my new hero. Looks like you've turned over a new leaf. LOL.

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2018, 01:50:20 AM »


Oh, and here's the monkey wrench you were looking for. I would have used an actual photo of a round earth but NASA doesn't have any...  ;D
« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 01:53:32 AM by nnnoooiiissseee »

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2018, 01:52:52 AM »
Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
and why there is that mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight.  :)
Third: If you claim thst there is any mysterious shadow on the moon in broad daylight because I've seen none.

March 6, 2017 at 16:29 EAST 8.3 days old Waxing Gibbous - taken from about 20 km S of Brisbane
Where is there any mysterious shadow on that daylight photo of the moon

If you disagree,  please show some photos with clear information about the location, date and time they were taken.

Now, please confirm that you are not a troll trying to make the flat earth look (more) ridiculous.
This photo was apparently taken in the day time? Correct?
Well, I did annotate the photo with "March 6, 2017 at 16:29" so daytime is a fair guess.In fact the moon would have been roughly 34į about the NE horizon.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
OK. If you're standing on the Earth and the sun is HIGH UP IN THE SKY one side and the moon is HIGH UP IN THE SKY on the other side WHERE IS THE SHADOW COMING FROM? It sure isn't coming from the Earth. Do you need me to draw you a cartoon? If you have a BASIC understanding of how shadow work, you should be able to figure it out. I have faith in you.
The only "shadow" on the moon is part of the unlit half of the moon. There is no shadow of the earth or any other object on the moon.

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
Now back to the cold moonlight. You seem to have given up trying to spin your way out of that one I see... LOL.
No! That's been dealt with. There is no such thing as "cold moonlight" so why should I humour you with more.
I haven't bothered looking at these but:

Debunking Flat Earthers Cold Moonlight Theory
         

Does Moonlight Makes Things Colder?
Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
It was nice of you to come to the defense of flat earthers BTW. You're my new hero. Looks like you've turned over a new leaf. LOL.
Sure I'll defend flat earthers when they are unfairly targeted and flat earthers have no monopoly on ignorance and bad science.
But I'll certainly tell flat earthers where they are wrong when I believe that they are.

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2018, 02:57:49 AM »
A simple thermometer proves that moonlight is indeed cold. You just keep denying it. I've disproved every bit of your bogus pseudo science in every way humanly possible. But you still deny it, just like you do everything else -- ALL DAY, EVERY DAY. LOL.

And do you really think ANYONE HERE or anywhere else believes you would come to the defense of someone who you're LITERALLY working day and night to disprove with BS? Really? You're so freaking transparent, it's comical.

I've already pawned you will ALL DAY LONG. I'm not going to waste my time trying to explain to you how a shadow works or how 12 noon would be dark as 12 midnight every 6 months if the McScience in your community college astronomy book checked out. You'll just Dummy up, LIE and DENY like you do everything else.

WHY IS MOONLIGHT COLD?

That's what this thread is about. STAY ON TOPIC or Go try to hijack another thread. Better yet, go start TWO NEW THREADS about the other two two topics so you can LIE, DENY and DUMMY UP about those for a while.


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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2018, 03:17:09 AM »
Oh, and here's the monkey wrench you were looking for.
No, there's no monkey wrench there! The earth doesn't rotate once in 24 hours. It rotates once in approximately 23.934 hours so try again!

Quote from: nnnoooiiissseee
I would have used an actual photo of a round earth but NASA doesn't have any...  ;D
I do not like people claiming ignorant things like that! Try a photo from a Russian satellite with a 121 Megapixel camera
Quote
Russian Satellite's 121-Megapixel Image Of Earth Is Most Detailed Yet
This perspective is quite different from NASA's pictures, Elektro-L No.1 Russian weather satellite generated 121-megapixel images that seize spectacular view of Earth.

Russia Elektro-L No.1 Earth image
The image definitely appears different than what we're used to seeing, and the reason behind this is the sensor added to the weather satellite chains data from three observable and one infrared wavelengths of light, a technique that turns vegetation into the rust color that overlooks the shot.

It captured the spectacular view of Earth in one shot instead of a collection of images from numerous flybys stitched together. The outcome is the highest-resolution solitary portrait of Earth yet.

Physics Astronomy, Russian Satellite's 121-Megapixel Image Of Earth Is Most Detailed Yet
Note that the image above is not the full resolution - that would be a massive file.

And USA (NOAA) has a satellite between here and the sun sending photos of earth. Here is an animation made from EPIC photos during the solar eclipse of March 9, 2016:


Eclipse from the EPIC on DSCOVR
         
And there are many thousands of photo by NASA, ROSCOMMON, JMA and other sources.

By the way, that silly cold moonlight has been debunked long ago.
The epitome of flat earthers would be Jeran Campanella, who posts on YouTube as Jeranism, debunked that a couple of years ago with:

Moon Light Test Results - Full Moon & New Moon Compared, jeranism
Look from 8:35 on for jeranism's tests.

But you still sound like a troll trying to make the flat earth look ridiculous. Even if you aren't you are succeeding admirably!

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rabinoz

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2018, 03:53:38 AM »
A simple thermometer proves that moonlight is indeed cold.
No it doesn't. All it proves is that the night sky, moon or no moon is very, very cold.

Tonight, a short time ago I did that very thing.
Using a good IR thermometer the sky measured -31įC but under the shelter of either trees or the verandah it was about +10 or 11įC.
And no moon in sight.

If the same experiment gives the same result with or without the moon present that is excellent evidence that the moon is not the cause.
Read: Why does moonlight reduce temperature?.


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wise

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2018, 04:06:00 AM »
Never did get a straight answer on that one... go figure.  :)

There should be enough observations to understand and explain the reason of this event. but this has not been done yet. The main problem here that we have to stand on it: is this cooling  the same for different colors and phases of the moon?. for example, the red moon, the blue moon and the white moon, full or crescent, have they same cooling?. Or are they different? this gives us a mind about it. the moon lights of different colors cool down at the same or different value. This works provide us to know that this cooling is independent of the moonlight color and phase of it or not.

the fact that the cooling is independent or not of the moonlight color will give us more healthy information about the actual source of this cooling.

I have not seen observations made for different moon colors and positions until now. this cooling may be has a single explanation, or there may be different explanations for different phases/colors of the moon.

We can not be sure the main reason of this event, before we see enough and comparative experiments depends on colors and phases of the moon.

The other problem is; the cooling being related with distance or not. For understand this, we have to do an experiment depends on distance of the moon with same shape. For example, two obversations should be made, one of them should be in time while moon is near and the other should be far, but with same color and phase. The difference of temperature works we to understand is the source of cooling depends on moonlight, or only existance of the moon.

Mostly in this site we are people who think scientifically, but not soothsayers. it may be wrong to provide information on this issue while there are not enough observations, measurements, researches and experiments.

Before do these experiments, all theories are in vain. These experiments are not done. The members here are generally researchers or scientists generally writes after a research or observations. So that all commenters are writing here vast in vain. There is nothing surprise here.
WARNING: If you're not on the side of wise, change your side, because you're undoubtedly on the wrong side.



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frenat

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Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2018, 05:16:50 AM »
No, moonlight does not make things colder

Re: Why is moonlight cold?
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2018, 10:03:15 AM »
Wow a few crazy things to point out here maybe ill throw in.
Poor rab is talking to a very loud and angry wall.

The partial moon during the day is not caused by a shadow.
The blue sky is so bright that fainter lights (stars and such) get over powered and become unseen.
Yes stars are always out there, even in the day.
The partial moon is getting so much sun that it shines bright enough we can see it in the day.
The back half is not shined on (try it with a basket ball, flash light, "any grade 3 can do it").
Look at the "curve" of the crecent...note its ever so slightly NOT a crescent.

Heat sinks.
We use this in building sciences.
Bldg will dump heat/ cold into concrete/ water below and make use of it later in day.
Much like the lake cooling heating effect.
Thats where your extra heat is coming from.
The point the guys were making was a placebo/ null experiment is required to validate between
exp1:  spot1 w moonlit vs spot2 w moonshadow
and exp2:   spot1 moonshadow vs spot2 w moonshadow.
You/ youtube vid never null tested the sample spot.
Grasp that concept and try it out.