What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?

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Similar to the ways we can calculate the altitude of the sun by measuring our viewing angle to it, it ought to be even easier to do the same to the north star, which doesn't orbit above us like the sun does.

For some reason, though, I've never seen an answer to this question.

Anybody know what it is?

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Ski

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Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2018, 04:19:35 PM »
I jumped and tried to reach. I'm not good at eyeballing distances, especially at night, but I'd say it is at least 25' away.
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Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2018, 06:54:52 AM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.
Just as it would depend on which part of a globe you are, if the star is part of a cosmos.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 09:26:40 AM by Didymus »

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2018, 08:58:27 AM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

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robintex

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Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2018, 11:58:45 AM »
Similar to the ways we can calculate the altitude of the sun by measuring our viewing angle to it, it ought to be even easier to do the same to the north star, which doesn't orbit above us like the sun does.

For some reason, though, I've never seen an answer to this question.

Anybody know what it is?

Some flat earthers say the stars are just inside the dome.....not quite as high above the earth  as the sun and moon....which sre 3,000 miles above the earth.
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

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Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 04:41:51 AM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

Well if I am somewhere with a latitude of 45N and the North Star is 3000 miles above the North Pole then the altitude would be 45 degrees.
This would also agree with the RE model.
The thought experiment might be more interesting using the Southern Cross.

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2018, 11:06:00 AM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

Well if I am somewhere with a latitude of 45N and the North Star is 3,000 miles above the North Pole then the altitude would be 45 degrees.
This would also agree with the RE model.
The thought experiment might be more interesting using the Southern Cross.

Cool. So it's 3,000 miles high.

Does that mean that Mexico City is 8,504 miles from the north pole?

?

robintex

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Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 12:38:17 PM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

Well if I am somewhere with a latitude of 45N and the North Star is 3000 miles above the North Pole then the altitude would be 45 degrees.
This would also agree with the RE model.
The thought experiment might be more interesting using the Southern Cross.

Try that with different latitudes and see what you get.
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Chorus:
Yes ! Never, never, never,  ever go to sea !

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2018, 12:52:55 PM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

Well if I am somewhere with a latitude of 45N and the North Star is 3000 miles above the North Pole then the altitude would be 45 degrees.
This would also agree with the RE model.
The thought experiment might be more interesting using the Southern Cross.

Try that with different latitudes and see what you get.

This is what Im getting at.
Careful here because these are supposed to be FE Qs and As.
So if I was standing at 45S would the altitude of the southern cross also be 45 degrees?
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 12:54:27 PM by Didymus »

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2018, 01:07:20 PM »
It would depend on which part of the plane you are standing on, if the star is part of a dome.

So let's say I'm at London - what is the altitude of the north star then? And what if I'm in Mexico City?

Well if I am somewhere with a latitude of 45N and the North Star is 3,000 miles above the North Pole then the altitude would be 45 degrees.
This would also agree with the RE model.
The thought experiment might be more interesting using the Southern Cross.

Cool. So it's 3,000 miles high.

Does that mean that Mexico City is 8,504 miles from the north pole?
If you mean 3000 / TanLat then that would have to be the FE answer.
Dont blame me.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 01:16:15 PM by Didymus »

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2018, 03:09:18 AM »
I thought of another way to measure the altitude of the north star that doesn't rely on us using distances to the north pole (since these can't be verified).

1. Find two places that are at about the same longitude
2. Take the latitudes (viewing angle to north star)
3. Work out the altitude of the north star from that

Since I live in the UK and feel completely certain that our maps and distances are accurate, I chose Brighton and Bridlington, which are both very close to the prime meridian.

The straight line distance between them is 227 miles.
Brighton is at 50.843N.
Bridlington is at 54.082N.

A wee bit of geometry reveals the altitude of the north star as being 2,522.98 miles.

This should work for everywhere in the world.

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2018, 03:23:58 AM »
I'll try two other cities and see if that works also.

Glasgow and Plymouth are at -4.2N, 380 miles apart.
Glasgow is at 55.858N.
Plymouth is at 50.371N.

This gives an altitude for the north star above the north pole of 2533.26 miles.

Pretty close! I guess this shows that the altitude of the north star is about 2530 miles, give or take a few.

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2018, 03:59:42 AM »
Just checking again with two other cities:

A point in Albuquerque at 35.1, -106.629.
A point in El Paso at 31.8, -106.629.

The distance is 228 miles.

This time I get an altitude for the north star of 1200.1 miles.

Whaaaat? What's going on?

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2018, 09:45:00 AM »
You've lost me now.
The altitude of a heavenly body is normally expressed as an angle.
The distance to the north star depends on whether you are working with FE or RE models.
In RE it is 433 light years.
Your OP asked about the flat plane, so in those terms it would be at the top of the Firmament, which I think is believed to be about 3000 miles (anybody who has a different figure please chime in).

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2018, 09:57:11 AM »
No need to be lost: the question is about the altitude of the north star above the flat earth.

Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2018, 10:48:27 AM »
You've lost me now.
The altitude of a heavenly body is normally expressed as an angle.
The distance to the north star depends on whether you are working with FE or RE models.
In RE it is 433 light years.
Your OP asked about the flat plane, so in those terms it would be at the top of the Firmament, which I think is believed to be about 3000 miles (anybody who has a different figure please chime in).

There is no firmament. We can't measure because the light from the north star is heavily refracted by the dome.


Re: What is the altitude of the north star above the flat plane?
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2018, 11:07:16 AM »
You've lost me now.
The altitude of a heavenly body is normally expressed as an angle.
The distance to the north star depends on whether you are working with FE or RE models.
In RE it is 433 light years.
Your OP asked about the flat plane, so in those terms it would be at the top of the Firmament, which I think is believed to be about 3000 miles (anybody who has a different figure please chime in).

There is no firmament. We can't measure because the light from the north star is heavily refracted by the dome.
How heavily? Is this an observation, or is it derived from logic or reason?