observation of orientation of the spots on moon or sun from south pole of earth

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Let in the following image (not to the scale)

Relative to observer A
The direction of the axis of the north pole of sun or moon is facing upward
The direction of the axis of the south pole of sun or moon is downward

Relative to observer B
The axis of the north pole of sun or moon is downward
The axis of the south pole of sun or moon is upward

Spherical Earthers: Would observer B see the letters "sun or moon" in the picture upside down?

Both Flat and Spherical Earthers: Is there any authentic picture or video of the moon or sun available which is taken from the south pole of the earth in order to see if the spots on the moon or sun look upside down / inverted.

« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 09:59:38 PM by E E K »

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rabinoz

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Let in the following image (not to the scale)

Relative to observer A
The direction of the axis of the north pole of sun or moon is facing upward
The direction of the axis of the south pole of sun or moon is downward

Relative to observer B
The axis of the north pole of sun or moon is downward
The axis of the south pole of sun or moon is upward

Spherical Earthers: Would observer B see the letters "sun or moon" in the picture upside down?

Both Flat and Spherical Earthers: Is there any authentic picture or video of the moon or sun available which is taken from the south pole of the earth in order to see if the spots on the moon or sun look upside down / inverted.
Read this article, Why Does The Moon Look Upside Down From Australia?.
It does not need to be from the poles. You will see this upside moon
  • looking south at the moon from anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere, north of the current latitude of moon compared to
  • looking north at the moon from anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere, south of the current latitude of moon.

Here are the photos from that article:

The Moon seen from the southern hemisphere,
taken on the 25th of November 2012, from Montevideo, Uruguay.
         
Full Moon photograph taken 10-22-2010 from Madison, Alabama, USA.
Photographed with a Celestron 9.25 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
         
And here is a photo I took looking due north from near Brisbane,  QLD, Australia, about 27° S latitude:

Moon at Alt 71.5deg Azm 0.1deg taken near Brisbane on May 19, 2016.
That last photo is a bit over exposed. The following one is better, but as yet I'm not I'm not certain of the direction:

2016-10-16 - Full Perigee Moon - 194
The same applies to the sun but it's much harder to observe.

Spherical Earthers:

No idea, why do we see the same lunar surface area (either sunlit or dark) if observed from North pole or Arctic Circle and South pole or Antarctic Circle when the axis (N-S) of moon and earth are not parallel to each other in space?

The lunar surface area seen by the aforementioned two different observers may be divided into three parts - RIGHT?

1-   Area visible to the observer on Northern Hemisphere only
2-   Area visible to the observer on Southern Hemisphere only
3-   Area visible to both the observers – Common to the observer on Northern Hemisphere as well as Southern Hemisphere

Is it true if not then why do we see the same lunar surface area from Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere

Sorry I couldn’t respond promptly due to some inexplicable reasons.

Spherical Earthers:

No idea, why do we see the same lunar surface area (either sunlit or dark) if observed from North pole or Arctic Circle and South pole or Antarctic Circle when the axis (N-S) of moon and earth are not parallel to each other in space?

The lunar surface area seen by the aforementioned two different observers may be divided into three parts - RIGHT?

1-   Area visible to the observer on Northern Hemisphere only
2-   Area visible to the observer on Southern Hemisphere only
3-   Area visible to both the observers – Common to the observer on Northern Hemisphere as well as Southern Hemisphere

Is it true if not then why do we see the same lunar surface area from Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere

This is correct. Because the distance to the moon is about 30 times the diameter of the earth (straight-line distance separating the north pole from the south pole), areas 1 and 2 are very small, accounting for only 1/90 of the surface area of the visible hemisphere, combined. Because that surface area is at the very edge of the disk we see, it's extremely foreshortened from our viewpoint, so it's a much smaller portion of the apparent disk, maybe 0.1% if my back-of-an-envelope calculation is correct. Area 3 is almost all (as in 99.9% or so) of the visible disk of the moon.

Why 1/90th? The apparent size of the earth from the moon is about 2° (arcsin(1/30) is a good approximation of the apparent size, and arcsin(1/30) = approximately 2°), so let's call it 2° to make the math easy. This means, from the point on the surface of the moon where only the north pole of earth is visible on the moon's (idealized perfectly smooth) horizon, you'd have to travel 2° of a great circle path along the surface directly toward the earth until the south pole just touches the horizon. It turns out that there is a 2° wedge from the center of the moon, forming a 2°-wide "gore" where the wedge intersects the moon's surface, where the earth's north pole, but not the south pole, is visible from the (idealized) surface of the moon. This gore is 2°/360° = 1/180 of the total surface area of the moon. Since we're only concerned with the visible half of the moon, it's 1/(180/2) = 1/90 of the lunar hemisphere that is visible from earth's north pole but not from the south pole. There is a similar gore in the opposite direction not visible at all from the north pole, but fully visible from the south pole. Away from the poles you would see part of each.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Your Source?

"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Appreciated! Shouldn’t the aforementioned lunar areas 1 and 2 be clearly visible in the diagram of the different phases of the moon seen from the earth's northern and southern hemispheres in the following link?

It can easily be observed if examine the positions of the pointed ends of the lunar sunlit in its different phases in the vertical plane.

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/moon/hemispheres.html

Appreciated! Shouldn’t the aforementioned lunar areas 1 and 2 be clearly visible in the diagram of the different phases of the moon seen from the earth's northern and southern hemispheres in the following link?

It can easily be observed if examine the positions of the pointed ends of the lunar sunlit in its different phases in the vertical plane.

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/moon/hemispheres.html

That page is asking for a login.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Try Google "does the moon look different in the northern and southern hemispheres" and then click on the first search - hope it will work

Appreciated! Shouldn’t the aforementioned lunar areas 1 and 2 be clearly visible in the diagram of the different phases of the moon seen from the earth's northern and southern hemispheres in the following link?

No. Those are just general diagrams, and the areas 1 and 2 described are tiny portions of the visible face of the moon. You'd really have to be looking for them to detect them at all.

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It can easily be observed if examine the positions of the pointed ends of the lunar sunlit in its different phases in the vertical plane.

The crescent shape of the lit portion won't change by even as much as the size of those areas, and maybe not at all, depending on circumstances.

The orientation of the crescent, but not its overall shape, depends on your and the moon's latitude. If you're looking at a waxing crescent moon around sunset from well north of it, its "horns" are to the left. From well south of it, its horns are to the right. If you're at nearly the same latitude, the horns will be "up". That's a different phenomenon, however. The fraction of the disk illuminated, and thus the shape, will be identical or so nearly identical that it would be hard to detect.

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Code: [Select]
[ftp=ftp://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/moon/hemispheres.html]http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/moon/hemispheres.html[/ftp]

I see the problem with your link now: that's an FTP tag, not a URL tag. It's the FTP server running on that system that's asking for user log in.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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he crescent shape of the lit portion won't change by even as much as the size of those areas, and maybe not at all, depending on circumstances.

shape and size of the crescent (or dark portion) remain the same what im talking about is the SHIFT in pointed ends of either lit or dark portion. I haven't yet performed the calculation but a total of 4% change (2+2 as per your claim) in the disc of any scale is perceptible to eyes - AM I RIGHT?

4 photos of a moon can be examined if taken in summer solstice, winter solstice, vernal equinox, and autumnal equinox when the moon is at equidistance from earth or showing identical features w.r.t earth








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he crescent shape of the lit portion won't change by even as much as the size of those areas, and maybe not at all, depending on circumstances.

shape and size of the crescent (or dark portion) remain the same what im talking about is the SHIFT in pointed ends of either lit or dark portion. I haven't yet performed the calculation but a total of 4% change (2+2 as per your claim) in the disc of any scale is perceptible to eyes - AM I RIGHT?

No, I don't think so.

A 2° slice of the surface of the moon is visible from the north pole of earth that's not visible from the south, and vice-versa. Each of those slices is about 1% of the surface of the visible half (since it's 1/90 of it, as explained above), but only one is fully visible at a time, or some of each, totaling up to the same 1%. But that 1% amounts to far less than 1% of the apparent disk, since they're at the edge so you're looking at them "edge on". I'm estimating about 0.1% of the apparent disk.

Quote
4 photos of a moon can be examined if taken in summer solstice, winter solstice, vernal equinox, and autumnal equinox when the moon is at equidistance from earth or showing identical features w.r.t earth

The distance to the moon at those moments won't necessarily be the same. The phases certainly won't be, nor will the librations (the slight "rocking" of the moon's visible part due to eccentricity of its orbit) be the same.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan