Are all masses like black holes?

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Are all masses like black holes?
« on: February 11, 2018, 07:54:07 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0

How are two objects attracted to their center of mass with F=GMm/d^2 which is less than infinity?
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:36:46 PM by E E K »

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2018, 07:59:25 PM »
In a word, no.

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2018, 07:59:52 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong
Tessa believes in the scientific method.
Yuri believes the Earth is a flat disk.
     _________              _________         _________
.<`X######I---I|    |I[][][][][][][][]I|     |I[][][][][][][][]I|
-=o--o====o--o=-=o-o====o-o=-=o-o====o-o=

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2018, 08:02:10 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0

How are two objects attracted to their center of mass with F=GMm/d^2 which is less than infinity?
No.

If you choose R = 0, then you also have to choose the mass applicable for R = 0.

Which would be M = 0.

So, rather than g = INFINITY, g = 0/0 which is undefined.


Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2018, 08:04:16 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2018, 08:07:33 PM »
In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate.
This is a possibility, but not necessarily true; it raises a number of problems such as all our known laws of physics being wrong, since they cease to operate at this point.

Also not seeing how this ties in at all with the OP.
Tessa believes in the scientific method.
Yuri believes the Earth is a flat disk.
     _________              _________         _________
.<`X######I---I|    |I[][][][][][][][]I|     |I[][][][][][][][]I|
-=o--o====o--o=-=o-o====o-o=-=o-o====o-o=

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2018, 08:10:24 PM »
In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate.
This is a possibility, but not necessarily true; it raises a number of problems such as all our known laws of physics being wrong, since they cease to operate at this point.

Also not seeing how this ties in at all with the OP.

Citation please....just borrowing one of your linesí

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2018, 08:11:07 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

Just because your primitive knowledge doesn't understand what happens doesn't mean it is unknowable. Terms like 'laws of physics break down' or your 'cease to operate' is just short hand for 'I have no fucking idea what I'm talking about' and 'Our understanding of physics is incomplete and wrong'

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2018, 08:11:41 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

Just because your primitive knowledge doesn't understand what happens doesn't mean it is unknowable. Terms like 'laws of physics break down' or your 'cease to operate' is just short hand for 'I have no fucking idea what I'm talking about' and 'Our understanding of physics is incomplete and wrong'

Ok smart ass spill your beans....
And as for not knowing what youíre fucking talking about, your a real expert on that.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:15:59 PM by Lonegranger »

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2018, 08:16:16 PM »
This is a possibility, but not necessarily true; it raises a number of problems such as all our known laws of physics being wrong, since they cease to operate at this point.

Citation please....just borrowing one of your linesí
You said it yourself...
In the centre of a black hole [...] the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate.

Well, I mean you didn't say it, but the website you ripped it from did.


If you want to disprove physics, you really need to do more research than the first result on a Google search...
Tessa believes in the scientific method.
Yuri believes the Earth is a flat disk.
     _________              _________         _________
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-=o--o====o--o=-=o-o====o-o=-=o-o====o-o=

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2018, 08:16:38 PM »
The "g" of an earth decreases above the surface of the earth while increases below its surface till it reach infinity. Try at a point which is 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 mm just above the center of the earth. Plug it in the formula. This is just an example.

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2018, 08:17:46 PM »
The "g" of an earth decreases above the surface of the earth while increases below its surface till it reach infinity. Try at a point which is 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 mm just above the center of the earth. Plug it in the formula. This is just an example.
It has been demonstrated to you precisely how and why the formula is wrong. That isn't a scientific formula, it's a poor corruption of one.
Tessa believes in the scientific method.
Yuri believes the Earth is a flat disk.
     _________              _________         _________
.<`X######I---I|    |I[][][][][][][][]I|     |I[][][][][][][][]I|
-=o--o====o--o=-=o-o====o-o=-=o-o====o-o=

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2018, 08:21:36 PM »
This is a possibility, but not necessarily true; it raises a number of problems such as all our known laws of physics being wrong, since they cease to operate at this point.

Citation please....just borrowing one of your linesí
You said it yourself...
In the centre of a black hole [...] the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate.

Well, I mean you didn't say it, but the website you ripped it from did.


If you want to disprove physics, you really need to do more research than the first result on a Google search...

Why? When itís common knowledge. Plus Iíve got a sore finger, hence all my typos! Plus Iím not trying to disprove physics, Iím disagreeing with you.....very, ouch, different things!

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markjo

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2018, 08:26:03 PM »
Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.
https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/oer08.sci.phys.maf.gravitynsn/gravity-at-earths-center/
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2018, 08:26:24 PM »
Why?
Why is it problematic to only use the first Google search result in an argument about an incredibly complex scientific topic? Gee, I'm not sure.

Maybe because this is the third result:

All you had to do was roll the scroll button on your mouse twice, something that isn't particularly difficult to do, even with a sore finger.
Tessa believes in the scientific method.
Yuri believes the Earth is a flat disk.
     _________              _________         _________
.<`X######I---I|    |I[][][][][][][][]I|     |I[][][][][][][][]I|
-=o--o====o--o=-=o-o====o-o=-=o-o====o-o=

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rabinoz

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2018, 08:28:01 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
No, it is not. The gravitation field at a point inside a sphere, at radius r from the centre, is due only to the mass inside radius r.

Quote from: E E K link
How are two objects attracted to their center of mass with F=GMm/d^2 which is less than infinity?

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2018, 08:30:39 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

Just because your primitive knowledge doesn't understand what happens doesn't mean it is unknowable. Terms like 'laws of physics break down' or your 'cease to operate' is just short hand for 'I have no fucking idea what I'm talking about' and 'Our understanding of physics is incomplete and wrong'

Ok smart ass spill your beans....

Firstly, I have tried to articulate the workings of the universe here prior, but either no one listens, cares or just parrots shit they think is correct and will take no other thinking seriously. Even if they are wrong and what they deny is the truth. Secondly, is it even wise to impart this knowledge to people that are far too young to deal with it? All I can do is guide you on a path. You must walk it.

What I will reveal is you need to think of black holes as not operating on a linear time dimension. If you wish to learn more about the nature of the universe you need to shake off the notion that time runs like a line, that has a beginning, middle and end. Time is a point (no not a spatial dimension style). Everything is, was and will be. The universe is both a planck hot singularity and an infinitely vast void of nothingness what you describe as its heat death as well as everything and every 'moment' in between all together. Your life experience and consciousness may seem linear, but for the universe it's not. What does this have to do with mass and black holes you ask? Well, what you perceive as the universe, IS the inside of a blackhole, or more apt, a singularity

You think you have free will, but do you? Everything post you make, has already been written  ;)

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2018, 08:35:27 PM »
Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.
https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/oer08.sci.phys.maf.gravitynsn/gravity-at-earths-center/

At this point, outside forces come into play, like the sun, or the jiggling jugs of an alien babe on the far end of the Triangulum galaxy. There is no point in the universe where this 'gravity' is non existent. Everything that has mass is attracted to everything in the universe. It is measurable. No exceptions

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2018, 08:36:24 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

Just because your primitive knowledge doesn't understand what happens doesn't mean it is unknowable. Terms like 'laws of physics break down' or your 'cease to operate' is just short hand for 'I have no fucking idea what I'm talking about' and 'Our understanding of physics is incomplete and wrong'

Ok smart ass spill your beans....

Firstly, I have tried to articulate the workings of the universe here prior, but either no one listens, cares or just parrots shit they think is correct and will take no other thinking seriously. Even if they are wrong and what they deny is the truth. Secondly, is it even wise to impart this knowledge to people that are far too young to deal with it? All I can do is guide you on a path. You must walk it.

What I will reveal is you need to think of black holes as not operating on a linear time dimension. If you wish to learn more about the nature of the universe you need to shake off the notion that time runs like a line, that has a beginning, middle and end. Time is a point (no not a spatial dimension style). Everything is, was and will be. The universe is both a planck hot singularity and an infinitely vast void of nothingness what you describe as its heat death as well as everything and every 'moment' in between all together. Your life experience and consciousness may seem linear, but for the universe it's not. What does this have to do with mass and black holes you ask? Well, what you perceive as the universe, IS the inside of a blackhole, or more apt, a singularity

You think you have free will, but do you? Everything post you make, has already been written  ;)

So if thatís the case you will have read this before...
Your totally full of shit, but slightly funny with it.

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2018, 08:43:56 PM »
Does gravity become infinity where the center of gravity of a mass lies?

Gravity pulls towards the center of mass. Simple Example;

Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
This equation doesn't work to calculate acceleration due to gravity, because you're using it in a case where nothing is being accelerated. There is no 'm' in your calculations, therefore there is no acceleration. You can see this because:
g = GM/R^2=nothing
There is no R, since there's no 'distance between' anything, or 'radius between' anything if you like, since there's only one object. Also, even if R=0, anything divided by 0 is nothing, not infinity.

So no, gravity is not infinite at the centre of mass, nor is gravity necessarily infinite at the centre of black holes. The Earth won't get sucked into itself, that doesn't make sense. For the Earth's mass to become a black hole, the Earth would have to be crushed to the size of a peanut. Then the density is so great it collapses in on itself to become a black hole.

tl;dr - your equation is wrong

In the centre of a black hole is a gravitational singularity, a one-dimensional point which contains a huge mass in an infinitely small space, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, and where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate....ía bit like the inside of shifters head, but I thought you hated gravity!

Just because your primitive knowledge doesn't understand what happens doesn't mean it is unknowable. Terms like 'laws of physics break down' or your 'cease to operate' is just short hand for 'I have no fucking idea what I'm talking about' and 'Our understanding of physics is incomplete and wrong'

Ok smart ass spill your beans....

Firstly, I have tried to articulate the workings of the universe here prior, but either no one listens, cares or just parrots shit they think is correct and will take no other thinking seriously. Even if they are wrong and what they deny is the truth. Secondly, is it even wise to impart this knowledge to people that are far too young to deal with it? All I can do is guide you on a path. You must walk it.

What I will reveal is you need to think of black holes as not operating on a linear time dimension. If you wish to learn more about the nature of the universe you need to shake off the notion that time runs like a line, that has a beginning, middle and end. Time is a point (no not a spatial dimension style). Everything is, was and will be. The universe is both a planck hot singularity and an infinitely vast void of nothingness what you describe as its heat death as well as everything and every 'moment' in between all together. Your life experience and consciousness may seem linear, but for the universe it's not. What does this have to do with mass and black holes you ask? Well, what you perceive as the universe, IS the inside of a blackhole, or more apt, a singularity

You think you have free will, but do you? Everything post you make, has already been written  ;)

So if thatís the case you will have read this before...
Your totally full of shit, but slightly funny with it.

Yes, your alt JackBlack said the same thing

Alt confirmed. I'll have to add you to my annihilation list. And you see with your dimwitted attitude why I wouldn't bother writing volumes of knowledge for you to simply dismiss anyway.


Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2018, 08:48:55 PM »
Quote
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.

All the masses of the earth don't act separately when attracting things but act jointly at the center of the earth where the center of gravity of spherical earth is.

Are all masses like black holes? i corrected.

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markjo

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Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2018, 09:03:02 PM »
Quote
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.

All the masses of the earth don't act separately when attracting things but act jointly at the center of the earth where the center of gravity of spherical earth is.
Only as far as objects external to the earth are concerned.  Inside the earth is a different story.
Isaac Newton proved the shell theorem[1] and stated that:

    A spherically symmetric body affects external objects gravitationally as though all of its mass were concentrated at a point at its centre.
    If the body is a spherically symmetric shell (i.e., a hollow ball), no net gravitational force is exerted by the shell on any object inside, regardless of the object's location within the shell.

A corollary is that inside a solid sphere of constant density, the gravitational force varies linearly with distance from the centre, becoming zero by symmetry at the centre of mass.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2018, 09:08:56 PM »
Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.
https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/oer08.sci.phys.maf.gravitynsn/gravity-at-earths-center/

At this point, outside forces come into play, like the sun, or the jiggling jugs of an alien babe on the far end of the Triangulum galaxy. There is no point in the universe where this 'gravity' is non existent. Everything that has mass is attracted to everything in the universe. It is measurable. No exceptions

Yeah, he should have said "the gravity at the center of the earth due to the mass of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out."

Better?

BTW, gravity from masses in the Triangulum galaxy (whatever they are, titillating as your suggestion about what is important might be) is insignificant, and what is there is mostly balanced by gravity from similar (or otherwise) masses in galaxies in the opposite and all other directions, anyway, so it can be considered to be zero for most computations.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Shifter

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Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2018, 09:15:47 PM »
Acceleration due to the gravity of earth on its surface; g = GM/R^2
Acceleration due to gravity of earth at its center; g = GM/R^2 = INFINITY, where R=0
Actually, the gravity at the center of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out.
https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/oer08.sci.phys.maf.gravitynsn/gravity-at-earths-center/

At this point, outside forces come into play, like the sun, or the jiggling jugs of an alien babe on the far end of the Triangulum galaxy. There is no point in the universe where this 'gravity' is non existent. Everything that has mass is attracted to everything in the universe. It is measurable. No exceptions

Yeah, he should have said "the gravity at the center of the earth due to the mass of the earth is zero because all of the mass around it pulls equally in all directions and cancels out."

Better?

BTW, gravity from masses in the Triangulum galaxy (whatever they are, titillating as your suggestion about what is important might be) is insignificant, and what is there is mostly balanced by gravity from similar (or otherwise) masses in galaxies in the opposite and all other directions, anyway, so it can be considered to be zero for most computations.

I don't care if there is a Googolplex of zeros after a decimal point before a simple '1'. It is measurable at some point. Sure, our clumsy senses might not know the difference or feel ourselves being pushed and pulled from all directions but at some point, you can measure a number for anything that has mass in the universe. 

Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2018, 09:23:54 PM »
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Only as far as objects external to the earth are concerned.  Inside the earth is a different story.

The weight of a mass of 1 kg at the base of theoretical hole whose base is just 1m above the center of earth would be = w = mg = 1 (GM/(d)^2 = 3.8x10^14 N = I am just using mathematical equation w = mg

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markjo

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Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2018, 09:48:07 PM »
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Only as far as objects external to the earth are concerned.  Inside the earth is a different story.

The weight of a mass of 1 kg at the base of theoretical hole whose base is just 1m above the center of earth would be = w = mg = 1 (GM/(d)^2 = 3.8x10^14 N = I am just using mathematical equation w = mg
And I provided a reference showing why that doesn't apply inside a solid sphere.  Here it is again.  This time please make an effort to read it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_theorem
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Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2018, 09:58:15 PM »
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And I provided a reference showing why that doesn't apply inside a solid sphere....
There is a difference between force on the particle and force between the particles. I mentioned this in one of my previous posts.

Gravity is always attractive, never cancel. As gravity pulls towards the center of mass, therefore, the power of gravity of all masses of earth concentrated at its center. If the gravity of earth is zero at its center then this means the value of gravitational constant "G" is zero at the center of gravity of all masses.

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Tessa Yuri

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Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2018, 09:59:44 PM »
If the gravity of earth is zero at its center then this means the value of gravitational constant "G" is zero at the center of gravity of all masses.
That might be true if the formula you are using is scientific and accurate. But as has been demonstrated, it is not.
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Re: Are all masses like black holes?
« Reply #28 on: February 11, 2018, 10:00:21 PM »
Consider the density. Just because something looks solid, doesn't mean there is no space in between it

Read up on neutron stars, quark stars, strange stars etc for what happens the more tightly you pack in mass

Re: Are all masses black holes?
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2018, 11:06:00 PM »
The "g" of an earth decreases above the surface of the earth while increases below its surface till it reach infinity. Try at a point which is 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 mm just above the center of the earth. Plug it in the formula. This is just an example.
Your example is many trillions times smaller than the Planck length.

Why would you expect your formula to work in that case?

Also, please provide the value of the mass in your formula.