Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)

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Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« on: January 27, 2018, 05:46:52 AM »
Dear society!
I am no flatearther but I am very interested how you explain our world with your weird ideas. (-: [/b]

1.
I think you all know that there is an lunar eclipse on 31st of January (Wednesday). 'We' have a very simple solution for the darkening of our moon. It passes into the shadow of our earth made by the light of the sun. That's why a lunar eclipse can only happen when its fullmoon, because it is at the other side of the earth. How are you able to explain this phenomen?

2.
I have a telescope and i have obseverd Juptier many times. This planet looks like a disk, but only by the first look. You can notice the big red dot passing over the surface, disappearing on the right side and appearing on the left side. So this is phenomen is only possible if a sphere spinns.
Further you are able to see Jupiter's moons orbiting in a circle around their planet. They dissapper behind their big planet in the shadow of it and flyby direktly in front of it, so you can see the shadows of the moons on Jupiters surface too. And whats so great about it, whith an big enough telescope you can watch this mystery magic event by yourself, everyday!

My Question: Why shouldn't our moon act like Jupiter's?

If you can correct me in any ways, want to add something or are able to answer my question, fell free to leave some comments here! (-:



« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 05:49:28 AM by Gregs007 »

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Macarios

  • 1891
Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2018, 07:09:28 AM »
Galilean moons are much closer and much faster than Earth's moon, with orbital speeds between 2 and 17 days.
Considering the proximity and the size of Jupiter, they would need much bigger orbital inclinations to miss eclipses.
On top of that, their inclinations are even lower than of Earth's moon.
Their inclinations are lower than 0.5 degrees, while Earth's moon inclination is 5.145 degrees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moons_of_Jupiter.

Besides that, what else you consider to be "not like Earth's moon" ?
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 07:11:33 AM by Macarios »
I don't have to fight about anything.
These things are not about me.
When one points facts out, they speak for themselves.
The main goal in all that is simplicity.

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Sentinel

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Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 09:27:05 AM »
OP forgot to add "pictures of eclipses are not to scale". You're so going to slaughtered by the FE now, my condolences in advance.  :P
"No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible."

Stanislaw Jerzy Lec

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 11:29:49 PM »
You're so going to slaughtered by the FE
Also due to the fact that anyone residing in the southern half of the US can verify by looking skyward that they are not covered by giant white lettering, yarp, the fe'rs cries of fakery shall echo far and wide.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 11:46:43 PM »
A more important question, why has the moon turned upside down on going from lunar eclipse to solar eclipse?
It isn't in a tidally locked polar orbit.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2018, 11:58:12 PM »
Right you are JackBlack.  I should also point out that nary an hour has passed on Earth between the two diagrams, yet the moon has rotated around half it's orbit.  This makes no sense.  You RE'rs need to figure your BS out.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2018, 10:54:50 AM »
Right you are JackBlack.  I should also point out that nary an hour has passed on Earth between the two diagrams, yet the moon has rotated around half it's orbit.  This makes no sense.  You RE'rs need to figure your BS out.

Or maybe an integer number of days has passed.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2018, 12:27:03 PM »
Very well Mr. Hill, but according to your spinney pear model, it would have moved around the sun during that time, so Earth in that diagram would be at a slightly different angle in the lower vs upper drawings.  LIES!





Ok, I'm done being a flat Earther.  That was kind of fun though.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2018, 11:30:47 PM »
Very well Mr. Hill, but according to your spinney pear model, it would have moved around the sun during that time, so Earth in that diagram would be at a slightly different angle in the lower vs upper drawings.  LIES!
Ah, but I meant solar days, not sidereal days, you see!

Ok, I'm done being a flat Earther.  That was kind of fun though.
I wouldn’t make a habit of it, the cognitive dissonance is unsettling.

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sandokhan

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Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2018, 01:10:05 AM »
'We' have a very simple solution for the darkening of our moon. It passes into the shadow of our earth made by the light of the sun.

But it cannot pass into the shadow the Earth.

A huge anomaly has been observed during the lunar eclipse.

During a lunar eclipse, it has been observed that the Earth's shadow (official science theory) is 2% larger than what is expected from geometrical considerations and it is believed that the Earth's atmosphere is responsible for the extent of the enlargement, but it is realized that the atmospheric absorption cannot explain light absorption at a height as high as 90 km above the Earth, as required by this hypothesis (as several authors have noted).

"It was also argued that the irradiation of the Moon in the Earth's shadow during the eclipse is caused by the refraction of sunlight in the upper regions of the Earth's atmosphere. However, the shade toward the center is too bright to be accounted for by refraction of visible sunlight.

That is, the pronounced red colour in the inner portions of the umbra during an eclipse of the Moon is caused by refraction of sunlight through the upper regions of the Earth's atmosphere, but the umbral shadow towards the centre is too bright to be accounted for by refraction of visible sunlight."


This planet looks like a disk, but only by the first look. You can notice the big red dot passing over the surface, disappearing on the right side and appearing on the left side. So this is phenomen is only possible if a sphere spinns.

The discoidal shape of Jupiter fits very nicely a rotating atmosphere model.

Here is the perfect demonstration that the shape of the Sun cannot be spherical:

https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=30499.msg1939765#msg1939765


By the way, can you explain why Nasa changed the colors in the following photograph?

http://mikebara.blogspot.ro/2008/01/revisting-true-colors-of-mars.html





Dr. Gil Levin's first-hand recollections of the whole affair are recounted in a recent
book by science writer Barry DiGregorio. In the book, Levin relates the remarkable
overreaction by JPL that occurred in response to Ron Levin's naive efforts to "correct"
what seemed to him to be a deliberate distortion of the incoming Viking Lander data.
According to DiGregorio's narrative:

"At about 2:00 p.m. PDT, the first color image from the surface of another Planet,
Mars, began to emerge on the JPL color video monitors located in many of the
surrounding buildings, specifically set up for JPL employees and media Personnel to view
the Viking images. Gil and Ron Levin sat in the main control room where dozens of video monitors and anxious technicians waited to see this historic first color picture. As the image developed on the monitors, the crowd of scientists, technicians and media reacted enthusiastically to a scene that would be absolutely unforgettable — Mars in color. The image showed an Arizona-like landscape: blue sky, brownish-red desert soil and gray rocks with green splotches.

"Gil Levin commented to Patricia Straat (his co-investigator) and his son Ron, 'Look at that image! It looks like Arizona'" (see photo above).

"Two hours after the first color image appeared on the monitors, a technician abruptly changed the image from the light-blue sky and Arizona-like landscape to a uniform orange-red sky and landscape. Ron Levin looked in disbelief as the technician  went from monitor to monitor making the change. Minutes later, Ron followed him,  resetting the colors to their original appearance. Levin and Straat were interrupted when they heard someone being chastised. It was Ron Levin being chewed out by the Viking project director himself, James S. Martin, Jr. Gil Levin immediately inquired as to what was going on. Martin had caught Ron changing all the color monitors back to their original settings. He warned Ron that if he tried something like that again, he'd be thrown out of JPL for good. The director then asked a TRW engineer assisting the Biology team,  Ron Gilje, to follow Ron Levin around to every color monitor and change it back to the red landscape. "What Gil Levin, Ron and Patricia Straat did not know (even to this writing) is that the order to change the colors came directly from the NASA administrator himself. Dr. James Fletcher. Months later, Gil Levin sought out the JPL Viking imaging team technician who actually made the changes and asked why it was done. The technician responded that he had instructions from the Viking imaging team that the Mars sky and landscape should be red and went around to all the monitors, "tweaking" them to make it so. Gil Levin said, "The new settings showed the American flag (painted on the Landers) as having purple stripes. The technician said that the Mars atmosphere made the flag appear that way [emphasis added]."

It turns out that DiGregorio's statement that the NASA administrator was behind the
monitor changing incident was based on a confirmation of this from an official source —
former JPL public affairs officer Jurrie J. Van der Woude — and it had an even stranger
and somewhat sinister angle: In a letter to DiGregorio (also reproduced in Mars: The
Living Planet), Van der Woude wrote:

"Both Ron Wichelman [of JPL's Image Processing laboratory (IPL)] and I were responsible for the color quality control of the Viking Lander photographs, and Dr. Thomas Mutch, the Viking Imaging Team leader, told us that he got a call from the NASA Administrator asking that we destroy the Mars blue sky negative created from the original digital data."

This bizarre sequence of events raises many disturbing questions. For instance, why
was the administrator of NASA so determined to conceal the "true" colors of Mars from
the American people and the world in 1976? Why would he order the head of the Viking
Imaging Team to literally eliminate an important piece of historical evidence from the
official mission archive — the original "blue-sky negative" — if the initial release was only
an honest technical mistake? Wouldn't that record be an important part of the ultimate,
triumphant story of NASA scientists correcting initial scientific errors, in their continued
exploration of the frontier and alien environment of another world? And why would a
young teenager (the son of one of the key investigators on the Viking mission, no less) be threatened with expulsion by the director of the project for simply tweaking a couple of color monitors around the lab?

« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 01:13:05 AM by sandokhan »

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2018, 02:50:17 AM »
'We' have a very simple solution for the darkening of our moon. It passes into the shadow of our earth made by the light of the sun.
But it cannot pass into the shadow the Earth.
Except it repeatedly does.


A huge anomaly has been observed during the lunar eclipse.
During a lunar eclipse, it has been observed that the Earth's shadow (official science theory) is 2% larger than what is expected from geometrical considerations and it is believed that the Earth's atmosphere is responsible for the extent of the enlargement, but it is realized that the atmospheric absorption cannot explain light absorption at a height as high as 90 km above the Earth, as required by this hypothesis (as several authors have noted).
No it hasn't.
Your quotes don't support your baseless claim either.

Here is the perfect demonstration that the shape of the Sun cannot be spherical:
And there you go off on irrelevant tangents, almost like you no your arguments cannot withstand rational scrutiny.

Re: Lunar Eclipse (Earth vs. Jupiter)
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2018, 12:01:54 PM »
As I recall there was an electrical cable on the Viking lander that did not appear to be the correct color when first photographed so NASA adjusted the camera's settings which made the landscape more red.