The sun on the plane.

  • 6 Replies
  • 1502 Views
The sun on the plane.
« on: November 27, 2017, 03:19:06 PM »
Hi everyone.

New to the forum here, so forgive me if this question has already been covered ( I couldn't find a 'search' function).

On a flat plane; if I can see the sun, then every one in the world should be able to see the sun too. The angle might be different, depending on your location on the plane. But it should be visible to everyone. Also, the sun should drop below the horizon at the exact same time for everyone in the world.

I live in Denmark. If I call a friend in Tokyo at 15:00 (my time), the sun will be up and visible at my location. But my friend in Tokyo would insist that the sun went down under the horizon several hours ago.

How does the flat earth theory account for the fact that I can see the sun clearly, while my friend cannot (let's say I'm on the phone with him during our test)?

?

robintex

  • Ranters
  • 5322
Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2017, 09:05:03 PM »
Quote from: Georg Gearless link=topic=72972.msg1988685#msg1988685 date=15118u24746
Hi everyone.

New to the forum here, so forgive me if this question has already been covered ( I couldn't find a 'search' function).

On a flat plane; if I can see the sun, then every one in the world should be able to see the sun too. The angle might be different, depending on your location on the plane. But it should be visible to everyone. Also, the sun should drop below the horizon at the exact same time for everyone in the world.

I live in Denmark. If I call a friend in Tokyo at 15:00 (my time), the sun will be up and visible at my location. But my friend in Tokyo would insist that the sun went down under the horizon several hours ago.

How does the flat earth theory account for the fact that I can see the sun clearly, while my friend cannot (let's say I'm on the phone with him during our test)?

Flat earth explanation.:
The sun "acts like a spotlight" and just shines downward on the earth.
It must have some kind of lampshade or lens to focus the beam into a little circle ?
It's like shining a flashlight down on the ground.
So if you're not under that beam you won't see the sun.
The sun is always 3000 miles above the earth.
The moon and the sun are both 32 miles in diameter and 3000 miles above the earth.
They orbit above the earth.
The earth doesn't move.
It's stationary.
The sun doesn't set on a flat earth.
It just gets big enough to see in the day and gets so small at night that you can't see it.
It just depends on how near or far you are from the sun as to how big or small it looks to you.
Just imagine if the sun was like an aircraft with a spotlight pointed down flying above the earth.

I think I had better stop now and let some flat earther explain this better. :-)
There is a lot more to it.
Check the flat earth wiki is what they always say.

I am a round earther.
Like Will Rogers said about (the newspaper) ,  "All I know is what I read on (The Flat Earth Society Website) and that's my excuse for ignorance."      :-)
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 09:36:39 PM by Googleotomy »
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Chorus:
Yes ! Never, never, never,  ever go to sea !

Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 05:33:55 AM »
Hi everyone.

New to the forum here, so forgive me if this question has already been covered ( I couldn't find a 'search' function).

On a flat plane; if I can see the sun, then every one in the world should be able to see the sun too. The angle might be different, depending on your location on the plane. But it should be visible to everyone. Also, the sun should drop below the horizon at the exact same time for everyone in the world.

I live in Denmark. If I call a friend in Tokyo at 15:00 (my time), the sun will be up and visible at my location. But my friend in Tokyo would insist that the sun went down under the horizon several hours ago.

How does the flat earth theory account for the fact that I can see the sun clearly, while my friend cannot (let's say I'm on the phone with him during our test)?
Why would you think the Sun should always be visible to everyone on the Earth?

Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2017, 07:00:14 AM »
Hi everyone.

New to the forum here, so forgive me if this question has already been covered ( I couldn't find a 'search' function).

On a flat plane; if I can see the sun, then every one in the world should be able to see the sun too. The angle might be different, depending on your location on the plane. But it should be visible to everyone. Also, the sun should drop below the horizon at the exact same time for everyone in the world.

I live in Denmark. If I call a friend in Tokyo at 15:00 (my time), the sun will be up and visible at my location. But my friend in Tokyo would insist that the sun went down under the horizon several hours ago.

How does the flat earth theory account for the fact that I can see the sun clearly, while my friend cannot (let's say I'm on the phone with him during our test)?
Why would you think the Sun should always be visible to everyone on the Earth?
Because basic trig puts it above 0 degrees (actually don't think it can even get to 10) for all feasible distances to it on Earth. But this is Q&A and I shall refrain from going further into it than that.

Googleotomy has posted on answer, the other one I see cited often enough is that it sets due to perspective. I'll admit I'm still trying to wrap my head around the odd idea of this, as it appears to use perspective in a different manner than the word is normally/traditionally used. But what I gather is that perspective causes things to merge/vanish far sooner than is currently thought when that object is at great distances. The sun sort of shrinks as it moves away from you, but due to a "well known magnification effect" of the atmoplane it keeps it's apparent size until it's moved far enough away that perspective causes it to vanish.

Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2017, 11:12:30 AM »

[/quote]
Why would you think the Sun should always be visible to everyone on the Earth?
[/quote]

I think the question here is; why wouldn't it be? That is essentialy the question I am posing.

Either it's below the earth (where you can't see it) or it's above the earth. Assuming a flat earth theory, no matter where you are on the disc, you'd be able to see it while it's above the horizon.


Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2017, 12:20:51 PM »
Quote from: Georg Gearless link=topic=72972.msg1988685#msg1988685 date=15118u24746
Hi everyone.

New to the forum here, so forgive me if this question has already been covered ( I couldn't find a 'search' function).

On a flat plane; if I can see the sun, then every one in the world should be able to see the sun too. The angle might be different, depending on your location on the plane. But it should be visible to everyone. Also, the sun should drop below the horizon at the exact same time for everyone in the world.

I live in Denmark. If I call a friend in Tokyo at 15:00 (my time), the sun will be up and visible at my location. But my friend in Tokyo would insist that the sun went down under the horizon several hours ago.

How does the flat earth theory account for the fact that I can see the sun clearly, while my friend cannot (let's say I'm on the phone with him during our test)?

Flat earth explanation.:
The sun "acts like a spotlight" and just shines downward on the earth.
It must have some kind of lampshade or lens to focus the beam into a little circle ?
It's like shining a flashlight down on the ground.
So if you're not under that beam you won't see the sun.
The sun is always 3000 miles above the earth.
The moon and the sun are both 32 miles in diameter and 3000 miles above the earth.
They orbit above the earth.
The earth doesn't move.
It's stationary.
The sun doesn't set on a flat earth.
It just gets big enough to see in the day and gets so small at night that you can't see it.
It just depends on how near or far you are from the sun as to how big or small it looks to you.
Just imagine if the sun was like an aircraft with a spotlight pointed down flying above the earth.

I think I had better stop now and let some flat earther explain this better. :-)
There is a lot more to it.
Check the flat earth wiki is what they always say.

I am a round earther.
Like Will Rogers said about (the newspaper) ,  "All I know is what I read on (The Flat Earth Society Website) and that's my excuse for ignorance."      :-)

Thanks for the reply Googleotomy.

I see what you mean about the lampshade effect. However, even if we imagine a giant lampshade around the sun, or the sun being a hole in a dark dome where the outside light shines through, light simply doesn't behave the way it is required to, in order to accomodate the observation of 'night time'. Light diffusion in the atmosphere alone, would light up the 'night sky' even when the sun isn't directly above the observer.

With a lampshade effect, we would also experience it going dark before the sun reached the horizon. But we can observe the suns trajectory in its entirety, from sunrise to sunset.

So, the lampshade effect or hole in the sky, doesn't explain the phenomenon of sunsets/sunrises at different time across the earth.

And finaly, I have a fundamental problem with accepting hypothesis' that require me to accept additional unsubstantiated hypothesis', in order to accommodate a working theory.

But I do thank you for reporting the gist of the theory as you understand it. And I agree, it would be nice if someone who subscribes to the flat earth theory, responded to the question.

?

robintex

  • Ranters
  • 5322
Re: The sun on the plane.
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2017, 10:28:04 AM »
I would like to see a flat earth explanation about the horizon, too.
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Chorus:
Yes ! Never, never, never,  ever go to sea !