Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?

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Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« on: August 04, 2017, 07:44:33 AM »
Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?

Can somebody show me a photo, where an object's shadow is much smaller, about 3% of the objects size when a light source is very far way.

If you are wondering why I'm asking, the solar eclipse shadow on earth will only be 70 miles in diameter (112 km).

We are told that the Moon's diameter is 3474.

The "scientist" show the below image for the eclipse to explain this,



But they tell us that the sun rays are always like this



One of these has to be wrong. The shadow of the solar eclipse on the Earth has to be at least the diameter of the moon or bigger.

Thus from optics for objects that are in front of parallel light rays, the diameter of the Moon can't be larger than 70 miles.

If you disagree, then post your photo on the thread that shows that the shadow of an object will be smaller than the object it's self.

To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2017, 07:55:11 AM »
Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2017, 07:56:07 AM »
Read the answers on your original post. It is stupid to start a new one.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2017, 07:58:16 AM »
Read the answers on your original post. It is stupid to start a new one.

It was stupid to post without reading my Thread. This has already been answered and debunked.

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

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Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2017, 07:58:55 AM »
Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
Because you'd need the exact same ratio to verify the effect?   ::)
And they didn't say flashlight, they specifically said "use a light source that is wider than the tennis ball".

And I agree, no point in starting a new thread.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2017, 08:00:42 AM »
Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
Your question was can an object cast a shadow smaller than itself, idiot! The answer was not to represent the sun, moon and earth, but to answer your simple question! Now work out her far away your 9 storey building flashlight would have to be placed to represent the sun, moon and earth!

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2017, 08:05:06 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.




To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

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Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2017, 08:15:23 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.
So the part about very large distances apparently escapes you.  And testing yourself is definitely out of the question.  What kind of engineer are you supposedly again?

Some slight convergences seen here
https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76261/ISS029-E-031270_lrg.jpg
But again we have the very large distances part.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2017, 08:17:07 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.

You fail to mention, light source (sun) 400 times larger than object (moon).  Like I challenged sandokan, show me a FE model that gives the results of the upcoming eclipse! No flatard can!

*

markjo

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Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2017, 08:23:34 AM »
Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
Did you take the ratio of the distances between the sun-earth and earth-moon into consideration?

You may find that the ratio is around 400:1 as well.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2017, 08:27:22 AM »
The ratio of (Sun Diameter) / (distance Sun to Earth)

= 1,391,400 km / 149,600,000 km = 0.9301%

The ratio (Moon Diameter) / (distance Sun to Moon)

=  3474 km / 149,215,600 km

 = 0.002328%

So the wall that the shadow will hit has to be placed 27.52 meter /  (0.9301%) = 2959 meter away from the light source.


The tennis ball has to be (Distance Earth to Moon)  / (Distance Earth to Sun ) = > 384,400 km / 149,600,000 km = 0.25695%

(2959 meters )* 0.25695% =  7.60 meters from the wall

So the light source has to be almost 3 km away and the tennis ball must be 7.6 meters before the wall.

The wall that represent the Earth has to be 9.90 inches in diameter.

Now go do the experiment and show me the shadow will be smaller than the object.

But you could scale down the problem, or you could put it in a Cinema 4D and show the results...
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2017, 08:29:21 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.
So the part about very large distances apparently escapes you.  And testing yourself is definitely out of the question.  What kind of engineer are you supposedly again?

Some slight convergences seen here
https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76261/ISS029-E-031270_lrg.jpg
But again we have the very large distances part.

Are you telling me that the shadows cast in your photo are smaller than the clouds?



Are you blind, they are much bigger!!!
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2017, 08:30:39 AM »
Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building
Did you take the ratio of the distances between the sun-earth and earth-moon into consideration?

You may find that the ratio is around 400:1 as well.

I was doing it as you were posting the thread!
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

  • 2627
Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2017, 08:32:44 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.
So the part about very large distances apparently escapes you.  And testing yourself is definitely out of the question.  What kind of engineer are you supposedly again?

Some slight convergences seen here
https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76261/ISS029-E-031270_lrg.jpg
But again we have the very large distances part.

Are you telling me that the shadows cast in your photo are smaller than the clouds?



Are you blind, they are much bigger!!!
I said the shadows show a slight convergence.  and if you look at the shadows, they do.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2017, 08:36:46 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.
So the part about very large distances apparently escapes you.  And testing yourself is definitely out of the question.  What kind of engineer are you supposedly again?

Some slight convergences seen here
https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76261/ISS029-E-031270_lrg.jpg
But again we have the very large distances part.

Are you telling me that the shadows cast in your photo are smaller than the clouds?



Are you blind, they are much bigger!!!
I said the shadows show a slight convergence.  and if you look at the shadows, they do.

Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

  • 2627
Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2017, 08:39:09 AM »
Show me a photo from outside where the shadow is smaller than the object.

The Distance Earth to Sun is 149,600,000 km

The Distance Earth to Moon is 384,400 km

The Distance Sun to Moon 149,215,600 km

Ratio of (Distance Sun to Moon) / (Distance Earth to Sun) = 99.74%

The same affect should happen on an object that is on Earth.

Show me a photo where the objects shadow from the sun will be smaller than the object its self.

The Moon is not larger than 70 miles in diameter. Case closed.
So the part about very large distances apparently escapes you.  And testing yourself is definitely out of the question.  What kind of engineer are you supposedly again?

Some slight convergences seen here
https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76261/ISS029-E-031270_lrg.jpg
But again we have the very large distances part.

Are you telling me that the shadows cast in your photo are smaller than the clouds?



Are you blind, they are much bigger!!!
I said the shadows show a slight convergence.  and if you look at the shadows, they do.

Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.
You're not seeing in this picture what the shadow is projected on.  That would be far to the right of the pic. You are instead seeing the alternating rays of light and darkness representing the shadow itself and that does converge as expected.

*

Sentinel

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Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2017, 08:41:27 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P
"No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible."

Stanislaw Jerzy Lec

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2017, 08:41:42 AM »
I have scaled down the model so you can do an experiment and prove your point

Light Source 1 meter diameter
Moon Diameter = 2.5 mm
Earth Diameter = 9.2 mm
Distance Light Source to Earth = 107.52 meters      
Distance Moon from Earth = 27 cm.

But i don't know where you will find a flashlight that has 1 meter in diameter, maybe you should ask commissioner Gorden to lend you his Bat signal...
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2017, 08:46:27 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P

Are you stupid????

Can't you see that the shadow length is much larger than the clouds?

To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

  • 2627
Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2017, 08:48:40 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P

Are you stupid????

Can't you see that the shadow length is much larger than the clouds?


Can't you see that is not the surface it is projected on?  That the width (from top to bottom) does in fact converge slightly?

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2017, 08:57:23 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P

Are you stupid????

Can't you see that the shadow length is much larger than the clouds?


Can't you see that is not the surface it is projected on?  That the width (from top to bottom) does in fact converge slightly?

Can't you see the length of the shadow.

Is the length larger or smaller than the object?

Why is their not a shadow like this for the Solar Eclipse?

Why is only the shadow length 70 miles in diameter.

And for the divergence that you are saying, that proves that the Light Source, the sun has to be very close to the moon to make this effect, like a regular flashlight and a regular tennis ball that have a small distance between them.
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2017, 09:53:08 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P

Are you stupid????

Can't you see that the shadow length is much larger than the clouds?


Can't you see that is not the surface it is projected on?  That the width (from top to bottom) does in fact converge slightly?

Can't you see the length of the shadow.

Is the length larger or smaller than the object?

Why is their not a shadow like this for the Solar Eclipse?

Why is only the shadow length 70 miles in diameter.

And for the divergence that you are saying, that proves that the Light Source, the sun has to be very close to the moon to make this effect, like a regular flashlight and a regular tennis ball that have a small distance between them.

Shut up shut up shut up shut up! I cannot take your stupidity any more.

Please, just come out and admit it if you are trolling us, I beg you!

?

frenat

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Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2017, 09:55:46 AM »
Look at the length of the shadow, much larger than the height. The same should happen with the Moon. The diameter of the Moon shadow must be larger if the moon os 3474 km in diameter.

Are you fucking kidding me...
You just can't be that dense.  :P

Are you stupid????

Can't you see that the shadow length is much larger than the clouds?


Can't you see that is not the surface it is projected on?  That the width (from top to bottom) does in fact converge slightly?

Can't you see the length of the shadow.

Is the length larger or smaller than the object?

Why is their not a shadow like this for the Solar Eclipse?

Why is only the shadow length 70 miles in diameter.

And for the divergence that you are saying, that proves that the Light Source, the sun has to be very close to the moon to make this effect, like a regular flashlight and a regular tennis ball that have a small distance between them.
AGAIN, you are not seeing the surface where the shadow is projected. 
And that is CONvergence and it proves that the Sun is very large and distant.  At this point I have to assume you are getting this wrong on purpose.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 09:57:17 AM by frenat »

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2017, 09:58:57 AM »
Read the answers on your original post. It is stupid to start a new one.

This is tangential to the original topic. I agree with moving this discussion to a new thread.

Anyway...

Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?

Yes!

If the source of light is physically larger than the object casting the shadow, the size of the area where the light source is completely blocked will be smaller than the object. Since you're referring to the size of the moon's umbra in this discussion, the umbra what I'll refer to as "the shadow" unless noted otherwise.

Quote
Can somebody show me a photo, where an object's shadow is much smaller, about 3% of the objects size when a light source is very far way.

Sure!



Quote
If you are wondering why I'm asking, the solar eclipse shadow on earth will only be 70 miles in diameter (112 km). OK!

We are told that the Moon's diameter is 3474 [km]. Check!

The "scientist" show the below image for the eclipse to explain this,



But they tell us that the sun rays are always like this



One of these has to be wrong.

Not really. All figures like this are necessarily diagrammatic. As such they are simplified to emphasize a particular point, and are certainly not to scale.

They're trying to illustrate different points, so they illustrate different aspects of the system. For instance, the second of your images is drawn to illustrate why the (roughly parallel) light rays from the distant sun warm one hemisphere more than the other at a solstice. It is not intended to illustrate the geometry of earth's umbra, as is the first of your images. For the second drawing to do that, the the ray tangent to the top of both sun and earth, and the ray tangent to the bottom of both would have to be drawn as well. Since the sun is slightly larger than the earth, as drawn in that figure, they would converge. Drawing those additional rays, however, would only clutter the diagram, adding nothing but perhaps confusing information that is completely irrelevant to the point it was illustrating.

Quote
The shadow of the solar eclipse on the Earth has to be at least the diameter of the moon or bigger.

Thus from optics for objects that are in front of parallel light rays, the diameter of the Moon can't be larger than 70 miles.

Nope. You are simply misunderstanding optics. What you say is true only for a point source of light at infinity.

The sun, as seen from earth, is an extended source, not a point source, so ray paths from opposite limbs are not parallel; they diverge (looking toward the sun from earth) by roughly 1/2 . Light rays from any one point on the sun hitting anywhere on earth are, for all practical purposes, parallel (but even those differ by about 0.005 from opposite edges of the earth).

Quote
If you disagree, then post your photo on the thread that shows that the shadow of an object will be smaller than the object it's self.

Note in the animated gif, above, that the shadow does not have a clear edge. This is because the sun is an extended source of light; as you move toward the center of the shadow, the moon blocks an increasing amount of sunlight (in the penumbra), so the penumbral shadow gradually gets darker; at some point, you get into the umbra, the sun is completely blocked, and it gets no darker.

Shadows cast in sunlight (or from any extended source) always have somewhat fuzzy edges. The further you get from the object casting the shadow, the fuzzier the shadow gets, so it's hard to tell, just by looking at a shadow, where the edge of the umbra begins. That's why you're not going to get "a photo, where an object's shadow is much smaller" for common objects. But, see below for a way around this.

Somebody wrote in a different thread about I can do it my self with a flashlight and a tennis ball.

This is wrong!!!

The Sun is 1,391,400 km in diameter

The Moon is 3474 km in diameter.

The ratio of Sun to Moon is 400.5181

The tennis ball has a diameter of 2.7 inches. To have the same ratio, we would need our light source to have a diameter of 27.52 meter.

That is a 9 story building

Who says the proportions in your experiment must be identical to the proportional sizes of the sun and moon? The only requirement is for the light source to be larger than the obscuring object.

If you were interested enough, you could set up a roughly circular extended light source (large round flashlight, floodlamp, or spherical light globe), smaller obscuring sphere, and find the point where they both have the same apparent size so the object just completely obscures the light. Move a little closer to the object so it appears larger than the light source, and measure how wide the umbra is (the limits where the light source is completely obscured) at that distance. It will be less than the diameter of your obscuring sphere if the obscuring object is physically smaller than the light source. Guaranteed!

In fact, it doesn't even have to be a light source, just something distinct that looks circular when viewed from beyond your smaller obscuring sphere, like a circle on a piece of paper or a larger ball than a smaller obscuring ball.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2017, 10:25:05 AM »
Stop feeding the obvious troll, retards.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2017, 11:02:18 AM »
Stop supporting your religion.

The shadow size proves that the moon is not the size or distance that you claim to be true.

Why does not the Moon shadow extrude to a larger length than its diameter?

You have been busted.

To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

?

frenat

  • 2627
Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2017, 11:39:00 AM »
Stop supporting your religion.

The shadow size proves that the moon is not the size or distance that you claim to be true.
Nope.  Acutally quite the opposite.  Just because you don't understand it doesn't mean it isn't true.

Why does not the Moon shadow extrude to a larger length than its diameter?
why should it?

You have been busted.
Still nope.  But thanks for proving you don't actually read replies.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2017, 11:43:16 AM »
Stop supporting your religion.

The shadow size proves that the moon is not the size or distance that you claim to be true.

Why does not the Moon shadow extrude to a larger length than its diameter?

You have been busted.
I have seen 5 years olds doing a better job at trolling than you.

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2017, 11:47:35 AM »
Stop supporting your religion.

The shadow size proves that the moon is not the size or distance that you claim to be true.
Nope.  Acutally quite the opposite.  Just because you don't understand it doesn't mean it isn't true.

Why does not the Moon shadow extrude to a larger length than its diameter?
why should it?

You have been busted.
Still nope.  But thanks for proving you don't actually read replies.

Show me the total shadow of an object that is smaller than the object. That is, the surface area that it cast on the earth will be smaller than the object!!!

Busted!!!!
To simply dismiss the concept of God as being unscientific is to violate the very objectivity of science itself.

My experiences with science led me to God.

The Truth Will Set You Free

Werner Von Braun

Re: Can an object have a smaller shadow than its size?
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2017, 12:03:23 PM »
The bad thing? You are mixing the umbra and penumbra parts of a solar eclipse's shadow.
The worst part? You are totally ignoring it, like a dammed mad man.

Don't you have better things to do than act like a 6 year old throwing tantrums in a mall?