What about the stars?

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CptObvious

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What about the stars?
« on: May 13, 2017, 11:01:36 AM »
you could even put this question in the Q&A section of this forum

Good point.

Hi. Quick and painless.

Some FE'thers cialm (if anyone wants, I'll provide you with links.) I can't see cities far away because of the atmospheres density. Alright.

But, how am I able to see stars above the horizon then? Shouldn't they be even furthey away than the nearest city?

As I didn't get an answer in the debate, maybe the Q&A will help me.

Thanks,
-Cpt.
Here is the earth with the moon, just for you:
O.

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CptObvious

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Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2017, 11:17:11 PM »
Still nothing? Come on, I want to know how FE explains this. Otherwise the theory got defeated... again.
Here is the earth with the moon, just for you:
O.

Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2017, 11:45:27 PM »
Stars would have a far brighter magnitude than any terrestrial light source. Don't expect to see a 40W light bulb shine from several light years away. Also its visibility IS affected by weather, pollution and 'light pollution'. This is why you cant see many stars in big, densely populated cities like Seoul, but you can in more sparsely populated rural areas or areas where there is not much surrounding light.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apparent_magnitude

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CptObvious

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Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2017, 02:26:34 AM »
Stars would have a far brighter magnitude than any terrestrial light source. Don't expect to see a 40W light bulb shine from several light years away. Also its visibility IS affected by weather, pollution and 'light pollution'. This is why you cant see many stars in big, densely populated cities like Seoul, but you can in more sparsely populated rural areas or areas where there is not much surrounding light.

I. Know. But this only works for a round earth.
Near to the horizon there would be some stars that are BEHIND some stuff on a flat earth.
For example, when I look towards a mountain behind earth's curvature (or the "FE dense atmosphere") i can see stars directly above the horizon. On RE, it is because the mountain is behind the horizon. On a FE.. Well?
Here is the earth with the moon, just for you:
O.

Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2017, 03:59:36 AM »
What about them?

Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2017, 09:28:43 AM »
What about them?

If you read the post at the top, you will find this, the original question:
Hi. Quick and painless.

Some FE'thers cialm (if anyone wants, I'll provide you with links.) I can't see cities far away because of the atmospheres density. Alright.

But, how am I able to see stars above the horizon then? Shouldn't they be even further away than the nearest city?

I suppose the OP formatting could have been done better, but the other participants in this thread seem to have understood it just fine.

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JRoweSkeptic

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Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2017, 01:25:31 PM »
Things seem closer to the horizon than they necessarily are; it's the same basic principle that makes it look like the Sun touches the Earth.
http://fet.wikia.com
dualearththeory.proboards.com/
On the sister site if you want to talk.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: What about the stars?
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2017, 10:22:41 PM »
Still nothing? Come on, I want to know how FE explains this. Otherwise the theory got defeated... again.

You win. Grab a plastic souvenir trophy on your way out.
Write your name on a 3x5 card and we'll use it to light the charcoal at our next BBQ.

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