Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2017, 06:16:03 PM »
I am not sure. We don't know yet. Is the earth flat or a globe?

It's a globe. If it weren't, you will very quickly find out, but the cruise company already knows it is.

Quote
Determining position it's interesting. We can't rely on GPS. We will have to use the old methods plus compasses to determine which way we travel. Any ideas?

Can you find someone to teach you how to do celestial navigation using a sextant, then practice, practice, practice? You will need to have accurate time to get accurate longitude, but, fortunately you have several options there.

You can use a GPS receiver for time, ignoring its reported position. This is probably easiest, but, y'know, GPS...

There are several shortwave stations that transmit little more than very accurate time signals, so get a general coverage shortwave receiver and learn the transmitter frequencies of several of these; you'll figure out which band to listen for at what time of day after a while. Downside: these stations are always operated by governments. Maybe compare some from different countries against each other - I'm familiar with two: CHU (Canada) and WWV/WWVH (USA), but there are bound to be others, and since they transmit on several different shortwave bands at the same time, all the time, they have worldwide reach much of the day.

Even cheap digital watches these days are very accurate, so get three or more and keep a log of how well they agree with each other, and with civil time, over an extended period before leaving, so you'll know which are running fast or slow, and by how much. Continue logging each against the others (and, if you have SW radio time, or GPS time, against that) during the voyage. Do not reset any of them while testing or during the voyage, ever, just note and keep track of what corrections need to be applied to each, and use the corrected times when calculating your position fix. Realistically, three Timexes, Seikos, or Casios (or one of each) will probably be within a few seconds of each other, and the correct time, after several months, so the whole correction table thing may be moot, but using three or more will let you know if one is developing a problem. This may be the most "independent" way, but could be the most involved (or not, if the watches are reliable and accurate enough).

It would no doubt be entertaining to see how well your celestial positions match GPS. You'll probably have lots of time on your hands.

This could be a lot of fun, though, and you'd learn an arcane skill. You can amaze your friends!
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2017, 06:03:42 AM »
compas is hard enugh on ground where u have stuff to orientate on gl with using that on open sea...
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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2017, 09:43:02 AM »
compas is hard enugh on ground where u have stuff to orientate on gl with using that on open sea...
Why not use GPS to know your location?

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2017, 09:44:18 AM »
coz it is rigged
Flat earth asshole: "The flat earth society is run by nasa" Random:"Just imagine the silence in the world, if people talked only what they knew"

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2017, 09:52:21 AM »
coz it is rigged
Please explain in detail.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2017, 09:57:43 AM »
coz fe dont trust nasa?? idk man
Flat earth asshole: "The flat earth society is run by nasa" Random:"Just imagine the silence in the world, if people talked only what they knew"

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2017, 02:05:09 PM »
That's right. According to flat earth theories there are no Satelites and we could be getting the wrong information.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2017, 02:33:19 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 02:41:19 PM by Sergeant Will Singletary »
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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #38 on: February 01, 2017, 02:48:52 PM »
That's right. According to flat earth theories there are no Satelites and we could be getting the wrong information.
Don't believe it.  GPS is used successfully by millions every day including targeting missiles and landing aircraft.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2017, 02:58:28 PM »
About the Antarctica trip at this stage we just need few names to put on the application to see if we get permission. Anyone who would like to be included in the application? You don't have to come if we get permission.

These are some of the organisations we will have to apply too. There are four more

Office of Oceans and Polar Affairs & action

Australia
Australian Antarctic Division
203 Channel Highway
Kingston , 7050
www.aad.gov.au

Rhonda Bartley 
Tel: 0362323618
eia@aad.gov.au


Office it Ocean and Polar Affairs (OES/OPA), United k Department of State
2201 C St., N.W., Room 2665
Washington , 20520

Mr. Evan T. Bloom 
Tel: 647-3925
Fax: 647-9099
bloomet@state.gov



Foreign and Commonwealth Office
K.2.55 King Charles Street
London , SW1A 2AH
0450009000 tony
Ms Jane Rumble 
Tel: 7008-2610
polarregions@gdshy.gov.uk

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2017, 03:15:21 PM »
Just spoke to the Australian body and she said to sent an email. If we want to go south from 60 degrees we must feel few applications and she made it sound difficult. Why? What's below 60 degrees?

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2017, 04:12:54 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.
Wait how many ships would it take to patrol the "ice wall" on a flat earth? Since Antarctica wraps around the entirety of the world on their map, that would have to be hundreds of boats, even thousands
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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2017, 09:10:17 PM »
Just spoke to the Australian body and she said to sent an email. If we want to go south from 60 degrees we must feel few applications and she made it sound difficult. Why? What's below 60 degrees?
60.01 degrees and many others.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2017, 10:07:28 PM »
Wait how many ships would it take to patrol the "ice wall" on a flat earth? Since Antarctica wraps around the entirety of the world on their map, that would have to be hundreds of boats, even thousands

Well just ask the AWPO above, they patrol the entire 70,000 miles in 2.5 hours apparently. Assuming they do 28 knots that's 70 n.miles covered in that time. So you'd need at least1000 very fast vessels, 70 miles apart, that's assuming they didn't have to navigate icebergs and other obstacles.

Or for those who prefer a more accurate answer... none, because the whole thing is fucking bollocks.

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JerkFace

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #44 on: February 01, 2017, 11:14:25 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.

Absolutely true,  my friend used to patrol the Australian Sector,  he was a specialist in training the attack penguins.   The elite penguin suicide brigade was deadly.

If the attack teams were too far away from the incursion,  then they would parachute in a suicide squad using a fleet of specially equipped drones. 

Then there is the NRO Antarctica Satellite Surveillance External Systems  NRO_ASSES  which the Sergeant curiously  failed to mention, I find that very suspicious.   Of course it's highly classified.

Stop gilding the pickle, you demisexual aromantic homoflexible snowflake.

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rabinoz

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #45 on: February 02, 2017, 12:24:22 AM »
Then there is the NRO Antarctica Satellite Surveillance External Systems  NRO_ASSES  which the Sergeant curiously  failed to mention, I find that very suspicious.   Of course it's highly classified.
I imagine that these numerous NRO Antarctica Satellites are in Antarctico circulo immobili orbits.

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JerkFace

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #46 on: February 02, 2017, 12:40:40 AM »
Then there is the NRO Antarctica Satellite Surveillance External Systems  NRO_ASSES  which the Sergeant curiously  failed to mention, I find that very suspicious.   Of course it's highly classified.
I imagine that these numerous NRO Antarctica Satellites are in Antarctico circulo immobili orbits.

Yep,   amazing machines.   Here is the launch of NROL-37 on a delta 4 heavy,   from Vandenburg AFB  Is it possible this huge satellite could be just for monitoring Antarctic Incursions ?  :)




Stop gilding the pickle, you demisexual aromantic homoflexible snowflake.

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Bullwinkle

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #47 on: February 02, 2017, 07:41:47 PM »
Then there is the NRO Antarctica Satellite Surveillance External Systems  NRO_ASSES  which the Sergeant curiously  failed to mention, I find that very suspicious.   Of course it's highly classified.
I imagine that these numerous NRO Antarctica Satellites are in Antarctico circulo immobili orbits.

Yep,   amazing machines.   Here is the launch of NROL-37 on a delta 4 heavy,   from Vandenburg AFB  Is it possible this huge satellite could be just for monitoring Antarctic Incursions ?  :)

" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">


Am I the only one who thinks the rocket assembly looks like a giant middle finger?   ;D

What an incredibly awesome machine !!!

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #48 on: February 03, 2017, 01:19:55 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.

I'm calling bullshit on this. Prove ANY of this nonsense

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Gumby

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #49 on: February 03, 2017, 01:38:36 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.

I'm calling bullshit on this. Prove ANY of this nonsense

No it's not.
It's the truth.
How dumb can you be?
I think MH370 was hijacked and the persons who did the hijacking were indeed out to prove a flat earth.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #50 on: February 03, 2017, 01:41:24 PM »
why is there an army at antartica???
Flat earth asshole: "The flat earth society is run by nasa" Random:"Just imagine the silence in the world, if people talked only what they knew"

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #51 on: February 03, 2017, 01:46:46 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.

I'm calling bullshit on this. Prove ANY of this nonsense

No it's not.
It's the truth.

Oh, okay then, I can't argue with that, case closed, point proved, sorry to cast doubt, I'll be off then.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #52 on: February 03, 2017, 01:52:41 PM »
why is there an army at antartica???

What makes you think there is an army at Antarctica?

From ARTICLE I of the Antarctic Treaty:
Quote
Antarctica shall be used for peaceful purposes only. There shall be prohibited,
inter alia, any measures of a military nature, such as the establishment of military bases
and fortifications, the carrying out of military maneuvers, as well as the testing of any
type of weapons.


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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #53 on: February 04, 2017, 06:01:13 PM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.

I'm calling bs on this. Prove ANY of this nonsense

Online sarcasm is obviously not your strong suit.
The Bible doesn't support a flat earth.

Scripture, facts, science, stats, and logic is how I argue.

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #54 on: February 04, 2017, 07:00:53 PM »
well he stated that there are armed patrol boats so it wuld be logical thet they have a base there...
Flat earth asshole: "The flat earth society is run by nasa" Random:"Just imagine the silence in the world, if people talked only what they knew"

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #55 on: February 05, 2017, 02:04:26 AM »
well he stated that there are armed patrol boats so it wuld be logical thet they have a base there...

If you're referring to the post by Sergeant Will Singletary then I'm fairly sure it was satire...

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #56 on: February 06, 2017, 06:36:08 AM »
They will have some retard excuse when you get back from the cruise and show them what all sane people know already.. there is no wall.. there are no patrols .

Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2017, 07:31:30 AM »
I would strongly advise against trying to approach the AW without prior authorization.  Trust me on this one, you don't want to do that.  I was an Antarctic Wall Patrol Officer for ten years, from 2001 to 2011. The length of The Wall is regularly patrolled by aerial and nautical patrol teams, which cover the entire length every 2 1/2 hours, and can spot large vessels by radar up to 90 miles out, and small craft (like a buggy or a canoe) visually up to 15 miles out. Anyone approaching within 30 miles of The Wall is contacted by radio and warned off. Approach within 10 miles and you will be intercepted by an Antarctic Wall Quick Reaction Team, usually disguised as regular military or UN forces. Any attempt to evade the AWQRT (pronounced “awkwart” by other personnel) will result in immediate use of lethal force. Over the last decade I’ve seen dozens of scientists, explorers, and lost adventurers terminated and disposed of.  And that's just in my sectors.
Wait how many ships would it take to patrol the "ice wall" on a flat earth? Since Antarctica wraps around the entirety of the world on their map, that would have to be hundreds of boats, even thousands

Realistically, no it would not. The starting and stopping points, given the known earth, would dictate any trip commence and ultimately end (if a successful round trip) at points such as South Africa, Argentina, Chile, Australia, New Zealand. Boats and airplanes have limited range, so any patrol boats used by governments would be primarily placed in or around these areas.

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RocksEverywhere

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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #58 on: February 06, 2017, 09:01:18 AM »
The distance via the South Pole varies from about 2,700 km to over 4,000 km and the air temperatures can be cold enough to freeze some jet fuels.

Jet fuel can't melt jet fuel
Antarctica was an inside job
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Re: Expedition to cruise the Antarctica coast line.
« Reply #59 on: February 06, 2017, 06:48:40 PM »
No problem getting a cruise around the Antarctic coastline; there are two or three ocean liners that do such circumnavigations every year (around February - summer in the South Pole).  The cruise takes about 4 to 6 weeks, includes several stops where passengers can go ashore and annoy the penguins or throw snowballs.  Don't expect to see any human constructions along the shoreline.  And don't expect to do any serious exploring - Antarctica is about as wide across as North America, with only about thirty human communities on the whole continent.  Figure that cruise tickets cost about $3000 per person and dress warm.