laser on a lake

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1on0ne

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laser on a lake
« on: November 21, 2016, 07:06:38 AM »
Some people unintentionally debunked the round earth by shooting a laser over a lake, picking the laser beam on a white surface on a boat farther and farther away.

the low point of the beam beam stayed at 50 cm above the water even at 5 km (3.1 miles) distance. At this distance the low part of the beam should be under 48 cm of curvature.

Stephen Hawking ordered the same experiment, but obviously done by some fiverr actors that did terrible job at making the laser parallel to the waters so they got a high target point on the boat.



Jeff
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Son of Orospu

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2016, 07:10:42 AM »
The roundies are like democrats.  They will pay to have actors do anything they say in order to make the opposition look bad. 

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RocksEverywhere

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2016, 07:16:08 AM »
This kind of experiment is pretty worthless since the assumption that water is always perfectly flat/curved is false.

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2016, 08:45:34 AM »
A later video where a helicopter disappears from view gives a clearer picture of the curvature issue! However all these tests over water are always fraught with refraction issues so nobody will ever be happy!

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Arealhumanbeing

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2016, 09:38:10 AM »
What does that diagram mean? I have never seen water stick to the side of a hill like that.

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RocksEverywhere

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2016, 10:12:32 AM »
What does that diagram mean? I have never seen water stick to the side of a hill like that.
It's obviously vertically exaggerated, but the principle is that gravity varies with the density of the crust/mantle and as such, water is more attracted to certain parts, and the surface of water will not follow the curvature of the earth perfectly.
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Arealhumanbeing

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2016, 10:18:52 AM »
Cool story bro, but that doesn't answer my question. Where did that diagram come from? What are those angles and numbers for? What does that diagram mean?

Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2016, 12:49:42 PM »
What does that diagram mean? I have never seen water stick to the side of a hill like that.

While I'm not sure, I think those lines (going from the bottom) indicate the direction to/from the centre of Earth, while the lines extending from them with the ball on the end indicate the direction an object would fall due to the variations in density and so on of Earth effecting the direction of gravity.

As for the numbers,
1 indicates water.
2 would indicate equal distance from the centre of Earth (possibly corrected for rotation).
3 indicates the the direction of gravity at those particular points.
4 indicates a landmass.
5 is a contour of gravitational potential, i.e. where everywhere has the same gravitational pull, so there is no advantage to moving to either side.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2016, 12:54:30 PM by JackBlack »

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RocksEverywhere

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2016, 02:51:56 PM »
I got it from the wikipedia page on Geoid.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoid

Enjoy.
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rabinoz

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2016, 04:43:25 PM »
This kind of experiment is pretty worthless since the assumption that water is always perfectly flat/curved is false.

Yes, but there are two problems with that diagram
  • There is obviously a huge vertical exaggeration, but no indication of how large it might be.

  • The deviations of vertical towards a high mountain or range are often much less than might be expected from the estimated mass of the mountain. This is because the the density of the material making up the mountain and its "foundation" beneath ground level is usually lower than that of the surrounding plain.
    Essentially that often why the mountain is there. This may not apply to all mountains.
In any case, these deviations are very small. Wikipedia, Gravity anomaly has more.

Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2016, 05:54:40 PM »
Some people unintentionally debunked the round earth by shooting a laser over a lake, picking the laser beam on a white surface on a boat farther and farther away.

So light from a laser is not affected by the same mirage/refraction conditions that affects all other light?

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1on0ne

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2016, 02:20:15 AM »
Some people unintentionally debunked the round earth by shooting a laser over a lake, picking the laser beam on a white surface on a boat farther and farther away.

So light from a laser is not affected by the same mirage/refraction conditions that affects all other light?
is it just luck than the curvature of the refraction/atmosphere puts the beam exactly at the same height than at the beginning of the experiment? There is not always mirages, and they appear farther away than 3 miles usually
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RocksEverywhere

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2016, 02:55:09 AM »
Yes, but there are two problems with that diagram
  • There is obviously a huge vertical exaggeration, but no indication of how large it might be.

  • The deviations of vertical towards a high mountain or range are often much less than might be expected from the estimated mass of the mountain. This is because the the density of the material making up the mountain and its "foundation" beneath ground level is usually lower than that of the surrounding plain.
    Essentially that often why the mountain is there. This may not apply to all mountains.
In any case, these deviations are very small. Wikipedia, Gravity anomaly has more.
Ofcourse there is a vertical exaggeration, how else would you show it? And yes, mountains do not necessarily imply a positive gravity anomaly, it's whats in the crust and mantle what matters.
AMA: https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=68045.0

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Re: laser on a lake
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2016, 06:58:15 AM »
Some people unintentionally debunked the round earth by shooting a laser over a lake, picking the laser beam on a white surface on a boat farther and farther away.

So light from a laser is not affected by the same mirage/refraction conditions that affects all other light?
is it just luck than the curvature of the refraction/atmosphere puts the beam exactly at the same height than at the beginning of the experiment? There is not always mirages, and they appear farther away than 3 miles usually
That was a completely amateurish attempt at levelling the laser. The boat was bouncing about and the laser beam was too wide. To me it looks like the laser is angled downwards near the end of the video, based on the lights at the other side of the lake and that the laser was hitting the water in front of the boat when it looked fairly close to the shore. How were the distances from shore calculated? It is not clear in the video at all, nor is the measurement on the boat very accurate. This video would be thrown out in any court of law as very poor evidence without even getting to refraction!