Poll

Do You See Curve?  

Sure, I'd believe anything!  
3 (21.4%)
No, I've learned how to tell the difference between reality and bologna!  
4 (28.6%)
I'm obstaining from forming an opinion, based on my fear of being wrong!  
0 (0%)
What was the question?  
6 (42.9%)
Only when I am heavily inebriated!  
1 (7.1%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2016, 08:16:55 PM »
I think you posted the wrong video. That doesn't show what you said it would.

Why don't you think it does?

Because reality. It has nothing to do with what I think.

The buoy is in view at the beginning. When the camera zooms in, there is no new portion of the buoy that becomes viewable. (Same with the boat, although it's moving around all over the place and its distance is variable so it's not as good of an indicator as the buoy, so we can leave that out of the discussion for now.)

It's obvious that the ship and buoy are several miles away from shore.  Yet, they are clearly viewable.  That makes no sense on a round earth and this is just one of thousands of videos like it, made mostly by amateurs.

It's obvious? How far away are they, then? What source are you citing for this information? And how come zooming in doesn't reveal any new information hidden behind the horizon (which was the original request that you said you resolved with that video)?

There's plenty of videos with more information on them all over youtube.  The ship and buoy can't be seen with the naked eye, but they can with a zoom lense, while standing on the beach.  This shows that there can't be 16 feet of curve or anything close to that. 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2016, 08:21:36 PM »
This is over the horizon:



This is showing different ships one being beyond the horizon:



That video is not a boat beyond the horizon.  That is an example of a camera not having enough resolution to resolve the boat and buoy when zoomed out.

I also like to point out there is a reason these,"restored a boat over the horizon" videos are all boats around 20 feet long.  Find videos of container ships and tankers.  Much larger and most likely a camera will be able to resolve the upper decks and part of the super structure.

Here's a video that addresses your concerns

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Woody

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2016, 08:31:25 PM »
This photo is of the Transamerican building taken wit an iPhone:


The picture was taken from Treasure Island which is located east of the building about 1 mile away.

Lets assume:

The picture was taken from 5 miles away.

The Camera height was 4 feet above the water.

That means the drop would be under 4 1/2 feet.

If we make a little more reasonable assumptions:

The picture was taken from about a mile away.  I will assume it was not taken exactly at the water's edge.

The height of the camera was around 5 1/2 feet.

The horizon would hide nothing since it is not beyond the horizon at a little over a mile and the camera at 5 1/2 feet.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 08:46:40 PM by Woody »

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Woody

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2016, 08:41:11 PM »
Here's a video that addresses your concerns



Take a look at the very start of the video.

Do you notice the horizon line and its relationship to the ship?

I drew it for you.  I even marked it lower in the image to favor your argument.



That is a video of a ship not beyond the horizon. If that ship was beyond the horizon we would see at least the bottom of the ship beyond the line I drew.

Just another video demonstrating a camera not having enough resolution to take an image of something while zoomed out.

« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 08:43:19 PM by Woody »

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rabinoz

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #34 on: October 08, 2016, 09:44:24 PM »
Look at all that curve in the "After" photo. What are you trying to say? That a picture, or even a person, could misrepresent reality?

Your picture is lacking context. Can you use a telephoto lens to zoom in on a ship that has partially gone over the horizon, and bring it back? Or the sun?

Can I use a telephoto lens to zoom in on a ship that has partially gone over the horizon and bring it back?  Yeah, I think I can  ;D


Brilliant, you've demonstrated that when you zoom back from long telephoto to wide-angle you make it too small to see!
But once something has really disappeared behind the horizon, it stays hidden.

Any more magic up your sleeve?

Are you kidding?  That boat is to far away to see with the naked eye!  Haven't you ever used the zoom on a camera?   

You claim "That boat is too far away to see with the naked eye! ", but that is not at all proven.

Look at the camera specifications,
"Nikon Australia - COOLPIX P900 - Take ultra high-power zoom to the next level with the new 16.1-megapixel P900 and get closer to your subjects with 83x optical zoom (24mm -2000mm equivalent in 35mm format)"

All it shows is that a 24 mm wide angle image, displayed on a computer display it does not seem to have the boat visible.
That is quite different to being "too far away to see with the naked eye". The naked eye has better resolution than that.

But, so what! The question in not
whether a boat "too far away to see with the naked eye" can be restored with a telescope, but
whether a boat that has apparently "disappeared behind the horizon" can be restored with a telescope.

That is a completely different kettle of fish.

While on that video, there is no clear evidence of the height of the camera or the distance of the buoy and boat.
Without that information, and considering what I said above, that video tells us nothing at all, so as I said before:

Any more magic up your sleeve?

Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2016, 09:57:34 PM »
The drop on the round earth is supposed to be as follows:  8 inches first mile, then 32 inches at the second mile, then at 90 miles it jumps to over a mile, then at 6,250 miles, the total drop becomes nearly 5,000 miles, which is about 1,000 miles too much on the round earth model, because the diameter of the earth on their model is less than 8,000 miles. 

O.k., so if you accept that, then you aren't saying that the earth curves 8 inches per mile, because over 6,250 miles, that would only add up to a total drop of less than eight tenths of a mile and round earthers are claiming a drop of nearly 4,000 miles, over just 1/4 of the earth's circumference (assuming it is round). 

Alright, so if your perspective is supposed to change, based on where you are on the ball and that model is actually correct (enough for government work), then you would only observe 8 inches of drop, for the first mile in any direction.  Of course, with telephoto lenses, we don't.   :o
The drop on the round earth isn't 8 inches per mile squared. This is what you would get if expanded square root function to Taylor series up to 1st derivative and ignore the remaining, higher derivative terms. So it's just an approximation that most flat earthers think is an exact formula.

Oh I see, well, do you have an alternative formula you would like to share with us?
It follows trivially from Pythagoras:

d^2=h^2+2Rh,

where d is the distance to horizon, h is your altitude and R is the radius of Earth. That's one interpretation of that formula.

Solve for h to find how much curvature there is with respect to horizontal distance d. That's second.

You can see why Rowbotham suggests that the approximate 8" x miles2 should not be used over 1,000 miles.
And when the distance approaches the equator to pole distance the slope finally becomes vertical.

<< I hope I haven't made any mistakes, but it looks OK. >>
The Rowbotham's formula is ok for up to ~50-100 miles (so it's ok for most applications) and it doesn't work at all over the ocean/sea/huge water - significant errors can be observed even under 10 miles distance.

Do you think it is grossly innacurate or just a little off?
The innacuracy is big enough to confuse most people. It's around 20%.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 11:15:40 PM by Brouwer »

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rabinoz

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #36 on: October 08, 2016, 10:45:53 PM »
You can see why Rowbotham suggests that the approximate 8" x miles2 should not be used over 1,000 miles.
And when the distance approaches the equator to pole distance the slope finally becomes vertical.

<< I hope I haven't made any mistakes, but it looks OK. >>
The Rowbotham's formula is ok for up to ~50-100 miles (so it's ok for most applications) and it doesn't work at all over the ocean/sea/huge water - significant errors can be observed even under 10 miles distance.

Do you think it is grossly innacurate or just a little off?
The 8" x mile2 estimate for curvature (Rowbotham''s if you like) is less than 1% out at 1,000 miles.
Refraction causes far more error than that!

Why would you want to "estimate" curvature for even that distance? It would be ridiculous.

If a person moves to another location on the globe that position becomes a new local horizontal. The person does not "slide off" or anything. "Down" for that person is the new direction pointing to the centre of the earth. That's gravity!

Now, if you don't accept gravitation, then that is quite a separate issue, to be discussed elsewhere.

Start a new thread on that if you like, but make sure you have the evidence to back up your claims.

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frenat

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2016, 06:22:39 AM »
Look at all that curve in the "After" photo. What are you trying to say? That a picture, or even a person, could misrepresent reality?

Your picture is lacking context. Can you use a telephoto lens to zoom in on a ship that has partially gone over the horizon, and bring it back? Or the sun?

Can I use a telephoto lens to zoom in on a ship that has partially gone over the horizon and bring it back?  Yeah, I think I can  ;D


That video doesn't show that.  The hidden part of the boat is never brought back into view.

edit to add:  Oh goody, yet another heavily biased poll!  Do you work for CNN?
The pictures in your first post mean absolutely nothing without the height of the observer and the distance.

That boat isn't one mile away, it is several miles away!   So, quite a bit more of the boat should be hidden from view, and the buoy should be completely/mostly hidden from view.  Yet, they aren't. 
You can't definitively say that without information on the actual distance and height of the observer.  You have neither.  My point stands.

In regards to the picture in the opening post, the distance is obviously several miles.  Even if it's just 5 miles, the drop should be at least 16 feet, but it isn't!  Furthermore, this is just one of thousands just like it and I've observed this myself!  If you really don't think you see it, you should try if for yourself.  It is a simple experiment to perform.
And AGAIN, the pictures in your first post mean absolutely nothing without the height of the observer and the distance.  You have neither.

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boydster

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2016, 07:13:46 AM »
Marciano, "some guy on youtube" is not a reliable source for anything. Weak trolling. Later tater.

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Woody

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2016, 10:42:59 AM »
Did some quick and dirty calculations for this image:



Here is what I used for the calculation:

Transamerica building height:853'
Lens focal length: 60mm
Height size of sensor: 225 pixels  (used information from photo properties supplied by Windows)
Height of object in image: 168 pixels ( just guesstimated by looking at photo that the building height was about 75% of the height of entire image. Did not want to count all the pixels)

From that I get the distance of .81 miles.

Of course that is a rough number but wanted something else to support my initial conclusion that the picture was taken from about 1 mile away.  I believe a rough estimate is adequate in this situation.

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deadsirius

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2016, 06:36:03 AM »


This means that the average slope of the earth must be a straight vertical drop on each side.

Why don't we see this?


OSG I know you are a round-earth guy so I know you're being facetious here, but really it's a baffling argument I see a lot on here.  People seem flustered by the notion that the "drop" becomes vertical...which ultimately always seems to boil down to a misunderstanding/rejection of gravity.

I mean, yes, if I'm standing on the North Pole, and you are standing on the equator, your "horizontal" (if I could see it) would appear vertical to me.  Nothing controversial about that.

Someone made reference to an ant on a beach ball and how it would certainly notice the increasing drop as it walked towards the "equator" of the ball.  Well, yeah, of course.  The beach ball has gravity pulling down on it from one direction--walking to the "equator" will indeed result in falling off.

I don't know how many times it needs to be said on here that the earth is not a beach ball.  There is no unidirectional gravity pushing from the "top" to the "bottom"!
Suffering from a martyr complex...so you don't have to

Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #41 on: October 10, 2016, 10:34:25 AM »
Here's a video that addresses your concerns
That ship isn't even past the horizon.  Can you find a video of a ship that is definitely "sunken" past the horizon that rises back up to full height while increasing magnification?

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #42 on: October 27, 2016, 02:20:54 PM »


This means that the average slope of the earth must be a straight vertical drop on each side.

Why don't we see this?


OSG I know you are a round-earth guy so I know you're being facetious here, but really it's a baffling argument I see a lot on here.  People seem flustered by the notion that the "drop" becomes vertical...which ultimately always seems to boil down to a misunderstanding/rejection of gravity.

I mean, yes, if I'm standing on the North Pole, and you are standing on the equator, your "horizontal" (if I could see it) would appear vertical to me.  Nothing controversial about that.

Someone made reference to an ant on a beach ball and how it would certainly notice the increasing drop as it walked towards the "equator" of the ball.  Well, yeah, of course.  The beach ball has gravity pulling down on it from one direction--walking to the "equator" will indeed result in falling off.

I don't know how many times it needs to be said on here that the earth is not a beach ball.  There is no unidirectional gravity pushing from the "top" to the "bottom"!

How come lead doesn't seem to attract dust any faster than feathers? 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #43 on: October 27, 2016, 02:22:23 PM »
Here's a video that addresses your concerns
That ship isn't even past the horizon.  Can you find a video of a ship that is definitely "sunken" past the horizon that rises back up to full height while increasing magnification?

I don't think you like my video
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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rabinoz

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #44 on: October 27, 2016, 04:06:40 PM »

How come lead doesn't seem to attract dust any faster than feathers?
I see nobody has answered your "lead and feathers" question.

The answer is simple. Gravitation is such a weak force that the attraction between a lump of lead and a mote of dust is far, far less than the other forces involved - the main one being from air movement.

You might also have asked how clouds stay up there. Clouds are water droplets and individually are heavier so would sink, if it were not for other forces.
Now this case applies to the Flat Earth's "pet theory" of Universal Acceleration as well.

Again the explanation is that clouds are held up there by very slight updraughts of air.
This is mainly brought about by the evaporation of water leading to water vapour, which is considerably lighter than air, so rises causing these updrafts.

The heating of air over hot ground can also lead to updrafts or thermals.

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disputeone

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #45 on: October 27, 2016, 04:26:28 PM »
Marciano, "some guy on youtube" is not a reliable source for anything.

+1
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For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this.

The reason I am consistently personally attacked here.
https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=69306.msg1960160#msg1960160

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #46 on: October 27, 2016, 04:30:44 PM »

How come lead doesn't seem to attract dust any faster than feathers?
I see nobody has answered your "lead and feathers" question.

The answer is simple. Gravitation is such a weak force that the attraction between a lump of lead and a mote of dust is far, far less than the other forces involved - the main one being from air movement.

You might also have asked how clouds stay up there. Clouds are water droplets and individually are heavier so would sink, if it were not for other forces.
Now this case applies to the Flat Earth's "pet theory" of Universal Acceleration as well.

Again the explanation is that clouds are held up there by very slight updraughts of air.
This is mainly brought about by the evaporation of water leading to water vapour, which is considerably lighter than air, so rises causing these updrafts.

The heating of air over hot ground can also lead to updrafts or thermals.

O.k., well there isn't much air blowing around inside my garage or in my basement, yet hundreds of pounds of heavy metals, seem to have no more pull on things towards themselves, than a piece of paper does.  Now if gravity were powerful enough to keep something like the pacific ocean, which has 187 quintillion gallons of water in it (gallon of water weighs over 8lbs), while the earth spins at over one thousand miles per hour and rockets around the sun at over sixty thousand miles per hour, I would think a few hundred pounds of heavy metal ought to be able to at least pull a little more dust than a pair of pants does! 

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Rayzor

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #47 on: October 27, 2016, 04:52:15 PM »

How come lead doesn't seem to attract dust any faster than feathers?
I see nobody has answered your "lead and feathers" question.

The answer is simple. Gravitation is such a weak force that the attraction between a lump of lead and a mote of dust is far, far less than the other forces involved - the main one being from air movement.

You might also have asked how clouds stay up there. Clouds are water droplets and individually are heavier so would sink, if it were not for other forces.
Now this case applies to the Flat Earth's "pet theory" of Universal Acceleration as well.

Again the explanation is that clouds are held up there by very slight updraughts of air.
This is mainly brought about by the evaporation of water leading to water vapour, which is considerably lighter than air, so rises causing these updrafts.

The heating of air over hot ground can also lead to updrafts or thermals.

O.k., well there isn't much air blowing around inside my garage or in my basement, yet hundreds of pounds of heavy metals, seem to have no more pull on things towards themselves, than a piece of paper does.  Now if gravity were powerful enough to keep something like the pacific ocean, which has 187 quintillion gallons of water in it (gallon of water weighs over 8lbs), while the earth spins at over one thousand miles per hour and rockets around the sun at over sixty thousand miles per hour, I would think a few hundred pounds of heavy metal ought to be able to at least pull a little more dust than a pair of pants does!

Ok,   try dropping that hundreds of pounds on your foot.  What did you feel and why?

Stop gilding the pickle, you demisexual aromantic homoflexible snowflake.

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frenat

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #48 on: October 27, 2016, 06:27:19 PM »

How come lead doesn't seem to attract dust any faster than feathers?
I see nobody has answered your "lead and feathers" question.

The answer is simple. Gravitation is such a weak force that the attraction between a lump of lead and a mote of dust is far, far less than the other forces involved - the main one being from air movement.

You might also have asked how clouds stay up there. Clouds are water droplets and individually are heavier so would sink, if it were not for other forces.
Now this case applies to the Flat Earth's "pet theory" of Universal Acceleration as well.

Again the explanation is that clouds are held up there by very slight updraughts of air.
This is mainly brought about by the evaporation of water leading to water vapour, which is considerably lighter than air, so rises causing these updrafts.

The heating of air over hot ground can also lead to updrafts or thermals.

O.k., well there isn't much air blowing around inside my garage or in my basement, yet hundreds of pounds of heavy metals, seem to have no more pull on things towards themselves, than a piece of paper does.  Now if gravity were powerful enough to keep something like the pacific ocean, which has 187 quintillion gallons of water in it (gallon of water weighs over 8lbs), while the earth spins at over one thousand miles per hour and rockets around the sun at over sixty thousand miles per hour, I would think a few hundred pounds of heavy metal ought to be able to at least pull a little more dust than a pair of pants does!
have you done the math to see what the force should be?

The Earth spins at 1000 mph at the equator but the resulting centrifugal force equates to less than 1% that of gravity.  It seems like a big number for the speed but because of the distance the force isn't that great.  The movement around the sun has no effect.

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disputeone

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #49 on: October 27, 2016, 06:40:23 PM »
Now if gravity were powerful enough to keep something like the pacific ocean, which has 187 quintillion gallons of water in it (gallon of water weighs over 8lbs), while the earth spins at over one thousand miles per hour and rockets around the sun at over sixty thousand miles per hour

Inertial FoR, yesterday on the way home I hit 280 kph on my bike (I like to feel alive sometimes.) How could I possibly stay on my bike travelling at 280 kph?? Do you see the logical fallacy?

The ocean is also strongly affected by gravity because (as you stated) it's incredible mass.

Also as Frenat pointed out RE science and math predicts negligible rotational acceleration (centrifugal force) due to the earths size, do the math if you are skeptical.
BOTD member

For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this.

The reason I am consistently personally attacked here.
https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=69306.msg1960160#msg1960160

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #50 on: October 28, 2016, 07:01:52 PM »
Now if gravity were powerful enough to keep something like the pacific ocean, which has 187 quintillion gallons of water in it (gallon of water weighs over 8lbs), while the earth spins at over one thousand miles per hour and rockets around the sun at over sixty thousand miles per hour

Inertial FoR, yesterday on the way home I hit 280 kph on my bike (I like to feel alive sometimes.) How could I possibly stay on my bike travelling at 280 kph?? Do you see the logical fallacy?

The ocean is also strongly affected by gravity because (as you stated) it's incredible mass.

Also as Frenat pointed out RE science and math predicts negligible rotational acceleration (centrifugal force) due to the earths size, do the math if you are skeptical.

That phrase, "do the math" sounds kind of silly or made up to me.  You know, if I don't accept the premise (gravity) then why would I accept "the math," as  if it had some authority. 

I don't think oceans have handlebars and isn't 60k mph, w/a 1k spin a little bit faster than what you're talking about
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #51 on: October 28, 2016, 07:04:00 PM »
I'd like to see you hang on to that bike if it started rotating, on its "axis" at 100 mph, let alone 1000! 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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frenat

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #52 on: October 28, 2016, 07:06:09 PM »
I'd like to see you hang on to that bike if it started rotating, on its "axis" at 100 mph, let alone 1000!
when that rotation also happens to rotate only once every 24 hours would it really be that hard?

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #53 on: October 28, 2016, 07:10:16 PM »
I'd like to see you hang on to that bike if it started rotating, on its "axis" at 100 mph, let alone 1000!
when that rotation also happens to rotate only once every 24 hours would it really be that hard?

How quickly does that rotation occur at the north pole? 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #54 on: October 28, 2016, 07:11:34 PM »


Flying motorcycle man  ;D
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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frenat

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #55 on: October 28, 2016, 07:13:29 PM »
I'd like to see you hang on to that bike if it started rotating, on its "axis" at 100 mph, let alone 1000!
when that rotation also happens to rotate only once every 24 hours would it really be that hard?

How quickly does that rotation occur at the north pole?
Still once every 24 hours, and at a far slower speed.

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #56 on: October 28, 2016, 07:25:07 PM »
I'd like to see you hang on to that bike if it started rotating, on its "axis" at 100 mph, let alone 1000!
when that rotation also happens to rotate only once every 24 hours would it really be that hard?

How quickly does that rotation occur at the north pole?
Still once every 24 hours, and at a far slower speed.

Yeah, I guess you're right
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #57 on: October 28, 2016, 07:25:41 PM »
But I still don't think you could hold on. 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

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Marciano

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #58 on: October 28, 2016, 07:26:15 PM »
Well, maybe you could.  hmmm 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!

It's not eight inches over the first mile;  it's eight inches over the first foot!   ;D

?

frenat

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Re: Drop On A Curve Vs A Straight Line Vs Perspective Vs Common Sense
« Reply #59 on: October 28, 2016, 07:27:14 PM »
But I still don't think you could hold on.
The math says otherwise.  The centrifugal force would be greatest at the equator and even then would be less then 1% of gravity.