Sinking Mirage

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Sinking Mirage
« on: August 02, 2016, 12:27:04 AM »
So according to some FE people, sinking mirage causes objects to set or rise behind/above the horizon.

This sinking mirage is just an inferior mirage we can see for instance during very hot day, when the road is so hot
is appears blue, but this is just a curved light path caused by the difference of temperatures.

Howevev, this explaination doesn't work.

1. Sinking mirage requires pretty static and similar heat distribution each day to produce the same effect at predictable hours.

2. Sinking mirages usually appear in hot days. So how would it work in cooler days?

3. Superior mirages are also happening. How, for instance, Sun sets/rise when superior mirage is happening?

4. Inferior mirage is described to be present on the surface. But there is a nice shoot from a  video posted by one FE guy, that shows Sun setting/rising behind/above the cloud line.



5. Lastly, since Sun rise and set occurs with both predictable schedule and the cycle is almost the same each year, that would require similar heat distribition year by year. Which is not what he have.

Summary: sinking mirage does not cause things to hide behind the horizon.

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2016, 11:57:50 AM »
Any counter-arguments, corrections, own ideas etc?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2016, 12:01:51 PM »
When a superior mirage is occurring, does the sun not appear to be higher than it should be?  If so, then the sun's position is pretty random, from our perspective.  Am I right? 

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2016, 12:08:14 PM »
When a superior mirage is occurring, does the sun not appear to be higher than it should be? 
Well, this is what that kind of a mirrage does.

If so, then the sun's position is pretty random, from our perspective.  Am I right?
No. The sun is tiny bit higher than it should be. There is no randomness apart from the actual distribution of the heat that can move the Sun up and down in a continuous way. The scale of this can be clearly seen during that kind of a mirage on other objects visible on the surface of Earth.

Anyway, how do these questions refer to the actual problem?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2016, 12:12:47 PM »
When a superior mirage is occurring, does the sun not appear to be higher than it should be? 
Well, this is what that kind of a mirrage does.

If so, then the sun's position is pretty random, from our perspective.  Am I right?
No. The sun is tiny bit higher than it should be. There is no randomness apart from the actual distribution of the heat that can move the Sun up and down in a continuous way. The scale of this can be clearly seen during that kind of a mirage on other objects visible on the surface of Earth.

Anyway, how do these questions refer to the actual problem?

I thought you hated me and were not going to respond to me anymore?  That is fine if I was wrong. 

However, the "problem" is the sun not being were it should be seen.  If you can agree that superior mirages are real, then surly you will admit that inferior mirages are just as real? 


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Son of Orospu

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2016, 12:23:50 PM »
So, we are in agreement that sometimes, the sun appears much lower that it should otherwise appear, and at other times it appears much higher? 

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2016, 12:33:22 PM »
I believe this is what I wrote in 1st post when talking about both kind of mirages.

But to be more precise, I don't claim or agree that the Sun goes up or down "much". It can go just a tiny as we can see in both mirages for objects on the ground. Tiny = ~1 degree, maybe up to 2 (based on ~100m (probably more) distance to the reflection vs ~1.5m elevation of my eyes above the ground).

Also, in 1st post I made a point 4. How does it work?

Also, if you claim it can go up/down "much", then specify by how much exactly. Qualitative term is relative, quantitative however...

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2016, 12:36:40 PM »
So, do we agree that your roundy friends are lying when they say that light only refracts in one direction? 

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2016, 12:50:46 PM »
You are going off-topic. The light bends i both dircetions and modern (older too) science knows it well.
I have on idea to what friends are you referring to.

Read the thread again. There are points, there is discussion about the mirage. And definitely not about round theory.

Thanks.

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2016, 12:54:46 PM »
Fair enough. 

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rabinoz

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2016, 06:36:07 PM »
So, do we agree that your roundy friends are lying when they say that light only refracts in one direction?
When you make accusations like that about multiple people you really should give the evidence for your claim:
"that your roundy friends are lying when they say that light only refracts in one direction".

So post your evidence or retract your accusation.

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Mikey T.

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2016, 07:06:24 PM »
So, we are in agreement that sometimes, the sun appears much lower that it should otherwise appear, and at other times it appears much higher?


No. The sun is tiny bit higher than it should be.

Here ya go, jroa.  Since you seem to have trouble distinguishing between tiny and much.  I copy pasted the definitions for you to study.  Tiny is not equal to Much.

ti·ny
ˈtīnē/Submit
adjective
very small.
"a tiny hummingbird"
synonyms:   minute, minuscule, microscopic, nanoscale, infinitesimal, very small, little, mini, diminutive, miniature, scaled down, baby, toy, dwarf, pygmy, peewee, Lilliputian;

much
məCH/Submit
determiner & pronoun
1.
a large amount.
"I did not get much sleep"
synonyms:   a lot of, a great/good deal of, a great/large amount of, plenty of, ample, copious, abundant, plentiful, considerable;

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2016, 10:59:47 PM »
So? The sinking mirrage has been debunked?

Soon perspective debunk.

Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2016, 01:38:12 AM »
So, do we agree that your roundy friends are lying when they say that light only refracts in one direction?

when talking about refraction and light mirages, remember you and your flatty friends' explanation for the lunar eclipse (FE's claim both sun and moon seen in the sky at the same time means the lunar eclipse cannot be caused by a shadow)

your explanation for sun rise/sun set debunks your explanation for the lunar eclipse

just pointing that out

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SpJunk

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Re: Sinking Mirage
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2016, 09:59:48 AM »
Ok, you were all on vacations.
You all saw lower half of the Sun hidden at sunset, upper half still visible.

Did mirage hide/reveal just half?

Or perspective works on Sun part by part, from lower, closer end?
"If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts." - Albert Einstein

"Your lack of simplicity is main reason why not many people would bother to try to understand you." - S.M.