Poll

Does Papa Legba understand newtons third law?

No
67 (87%)
Yes
10 (13%)

Total Members Voted: 73

Newtons third law

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*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #750 on: June 17, 2016, 07:18:49 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.

Are you saying something like a cube made of cork  weighing 1 kg will displace the same amount of a fluid as a 1 kg cube of lead?
Yep, that's what I'm saying.

Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #751 on: June 17, 2016, 07:21:56 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.

Are you saying something like a cube made of cork  weighing 1 kg will displace the same amount of a fluid as a 1 kg cube of lead?
Yep, that's what I'm saying.
Prove it.  A cubic meter of lead is a different mass/weight to a cubic meter of copper.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #752 on: June 17, 2016, 07:23:58 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.

Are you saying something like a cube made of cork  weighing 1 kg will displace the same amount of a fluid as a 1 kg cube of lead?
Yep, that's what I'm saying.
Prove it.  A cubic meter of lead is a different mass/weight to a cubic meter of copper.
Correct. I don't deny that.

Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #753 on: June 17, 2016, 07:26:46 AM »
Thank you, shills!!!   Keep up the good work!  Keep asking more and more questions!!

The more shillery, the more I learn the truth!! 





SceptiMatic,
Again, a sincere thank you for your perseverence in clearly explaining denpressure. 



Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #754 on: June 17, 2016, 07:27:49 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.

Are you saying something like a cube made of cork  weighing 1 kg will displace the same amount of a fluid as a 1 kg cube of lead?
Yep, that's what I'm saying.
Prove it.  A cubic meter of lead is a different mass/weight to a cubic meter of copper.
Correct. I don't deny that.
Yet the cube of cork, or copper, is a different size to a cube of lead of the same weight.

*

sokarul

  • 18943
  • Extra Racist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #755 on: June 17, 2016, 07:51:01 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.
Yeah ok dude. Wink wink.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #756 on: June 17, 2016, 07:59:40 AM »
Thank you, shills!!!   Keep up the good work!  Keep asking more and more questions!!

The more shillery, the more I learn the truth!! 





SceptiMatic,
Again, a sincere thank you for your perseverence in clearly explaining denpressure.
You're welcome.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #757 on: June 17, 2016, 08:02:20 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.

Are you saying something like a cube made of cork  weighing 1 kg will displace the same amount of a fluid as a 1 kg cube of lead?
Yep, that's what I'm saying.
Prove it.  A cubic meter of lead is a different mass/weight to a cubic meter of copper.
Correct. I don't deny that.
Yet the cube of cork, or copper, is a different size to a cube of lead of the same weight.
Exactly, because some are more porous than others so will naturally take up more area than others but will still reads the same weight due to atmospheric pressure they are up against or displacing.

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 42360
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #758 on: June 17, 2016, 08:05:22 AM »
At sea level, air has a density of about 1.2 kg/m3.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3.

Iron has a density of almost 7900 kg/m3.

Newton said that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Think about that for a bit when you talk about displacement or try to claim that a rocket has to push off the atmosphere in order to move.
Nothing you said goes against what I said.
How can 1 cubic meter of iron displace nearly 8 tonnes of air?
Sea level atmosphere is 14.7 psi.

How much would your iron block weigh on a scale?
Since iron has a density of about 7900 kg/m3, a 1 m3 block would weigh about 7900 kg. Which is a kick in the arse from being 8 tonnes
 
Just for the sake of clairty, please describe the differences between mass, density, weight and displacement.
Does this sort of give you a clue about the displacement of atmosphere?
Not really.  A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?

Mass and density can be regarded as the same thing really. It just comes down to how one person wants toi view one thing. the science world would have us all in a mix because it suits them.
Not really.  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.

Weight is merely a man made scale of measurement of mass/density of whatever object displaces atmospheric pressure.
Just like your near 8 tonne block diplaces near 8 tonnes of atmosphere. This is why your near 8 tonne block measures near 8 tonne of weight on a man made measuring scale plate.
Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).

Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #759 on: June 17, 2016, 08:30:54 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.

Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #760 on: June 17, 2016, 08:41:23 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #761 on: June 17, 2016, 08:47:56 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #762 on: June 17, 2016, 09:04:13 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.
I think not.  Explain last statement problem.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #763 on: June 17, 2016, 09:09:30 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.
I think not.  Explain last statement problem.
What does a block of lead covered with a thin layer of copper show?
I'll tell you what - and take notice. If you come out with this crap again I will completely blank you. I normally do blank you but gave you a chance to act normal. Do so or don't waste your time with me.

*

Pezevenk

  • 15331
  • Militant aporfyrodrakonist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #764 on: June 17, 2016, 09:15:57 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
Member of the BOTD for Anti Fascism and Racism

It is not a scientific fact, it is a scientific fuck!
-Intikam

Read a bit psicology and stick your imo to where it comes from
-Intikam (again)

?

Papa Legba

  • Ranters
  • 9566
  • Welcome to the CIA Troll/Shill Society.
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #765 on: June 17, 2016, 09:16:44 AM »
The only clown here is the one that keeps pasting newtons 3rd law. Isn't it past your bedtime little buddy?

Lol at yet another shill sock-puppet instantly going on the attack, using the exact same words as every other shill sock-puppet: 'isn't it past your bedtime little buddy' LMFAO!!!

You simply don't give a fuck how obvious you are any more, do you?

Poor mad fuckers...


I got Trolled & Shilled at the CIA Troll/Shill Society and now I feel EPIC!!!

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #766 on: June 17, 2016, 09:32:17 AM »
No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle?
Because the bottle is not porous enough to allow air nor liquid to pass through it, just inside of it.

If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it?
It would mix due to the glass being in an expanded state upon heating.

WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE?
They can be depending on the severity of a high verses low pressure differential.

How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)?
Name me something that can work in a vacuum that you can absolutely verify.
Also, things can work in lower pressure environments because it's still atmosphere.

Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air?
Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot.

Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
Pushing on anything displaces air all the time, no matter what. It's why we are alive and it's why anything and everything moves. High V low pressure differences.

*

sokarul

  • 18943
  • Extra Racist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #767 on: June 17, 2016, 09:32:17 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #768 on: June 17, 2016, 09:35:32 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 42360
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #769 on: June 17, 2016, 09:36:58 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
So you're saying that water is more porous than iron?  Does that even make sense? ???

  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.
Well, at least we agree on something.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Oh?  Why not?  Are you saying that an object will weigh the same sitting on a table as it does in a rapidly spinning centrifuge?

Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
BTW, displacement is measured in the weight of the fluid displaced, not the weight of the object itself.  If the displaced fluid weighs more than the object, then the object floats.  If the displaced fluid weighs less than the object, then the object sinks.  This is known a buoyancy and should not be confused with weight.

That is unless you want to say that Archimedes is wrong too.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

sokarul

  • 18943
  • Extra Racist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #770 on: June 17, 2016, 09:40:08 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?
We already had this argument long ago. If air freely passes through less dense objects, then vacuum packing and other anaerobic conditions can't exist.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #771 on: June 17, 2016, 10:08:10 AM »
So you're saying that water is more porous than iron?  Does that even make sense? ???

You forgot that you are using water against iron, meaning liquid against solid. Make them both solid and things change.

Are you saying that an object will weigh the same sitting on a table as it does in a rapidly spinning centrifuge?

How would you weigh something in a rapidly spinning centrifuge?

BTW, displacement is measured in the weight of the fluid displaced, not the weight of the object itself.
By pressure of atmosphere upon the object that is resisting that atmospheric pressure.

  If the displaced fluid weighs more than the object, then the object floats.
  If the displaced fluid weighs less than the object, then the object sinks.
  This is known a buoyancy and should not be confused with weight.

That is unless you want to say that Archimedes is wrong too.
So why are you using weight to tell me that I shouldn't be confusing weight?

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #772 on: June 17, 2016, 10:09:54 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?
We already had this argument long ago. If air freely passes through less dense objects, then vacuum packing and other anaerobic conditions can't exist.
Who said air passes freely through less dense objects?

I said it passes more freely through POROUS objects.

Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #773 on: June 17, 2016, 10:43:24 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?
We already had this argument long ago. If air freely passes through less dense objects, then vacuum packing and other anaerobic conditions can't exist.
Who said air passes freely through less dense objects?

I said it passes more freely through POROUS objects.
Please prove that air passes through copper. At what rate?

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #774 on: June 17, 2016, 10:47:26 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?
We already had this argument long ago. If air freely passes through less dense objects, then vacuum packing and other anaerobic conditions can't exist.
Who said air passes freely through less dense objects?

I said it passes more freely through POROUS objects.
Please prove that air passes through copper. At what rate?
You can't say you weren't warned.

*

Pezevenk

  • 15331
  • Militant aporfyrodrakonist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #775 on: June 17, 2016, 11:05:29 AM »
No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle?
Because the bottle is not porous enough to allow air nor liquid to pass through it, just inside of it.

If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it?
It would mix due to the glass being in an expanded state upon heating.

WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE?
They can be depending on the severity of a high verses low pressure differential.

How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)?
Name me something that can work in a vacuum that you can absolutely verify.
Also, things can work in lower pressure environments because it's still atmosphere.

Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air?
Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot.

Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
Pushing on anything displaces air all the time, no matter what. It's why we are alive and it's why anything and everything moves. High V low pressure differences.

Now you're trapped. If the bottle is porous enough to let air get in the interior of it, then what if I cut the glass in half? Surely now the air can get through it!

"It would mix due to the glass being in an expanded state upon heating."

WTF does that even mean? Seriously, you have to explain it.

"They can be depending on the severity of a high verses low pressure differential."


First of all, that doesn't make sense. Second, if you haven't yet realized it, wind often moves faster than your legs on a swing. If moving your legs on a swing is enough to push yourself, wind should be able to throw you around as if you weren't anything at all.

"Name me something that can work in a vacuum that you can absolutely verify."

What do you mean by "can work"? I know things can fall for a start, and that things weigh the same.

"Also, things can work in lower pressure environments because it's still atmosphere."


Yes, but they would work much different. Their mass for a start would be much lower, as they would displace much less air.

"Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot."


I can show you that the force required to get you from being stationary to swinging is so much that you'd be able to AT LEAST feel less heavy as you swing your arms around, but I'm not going to do that. Instead, what I will do is tell you this: if I am sitting on a cart or on ice skates or something similar (that would "take my weight"), I should be able to propel myself by "swimming" through the air, and very fast.

"Pushing on anything displaces air all the time, no matter what. It's why we are alive and it's why anything and everything moves. High V low pressure differences."

HOW does it displace air?
Member of the BOTD for Anti Fascism and Racism

It is not a scientific fact, it is a scientific fuck!
-Intikam

Read a bit psicology and stick your imo to where it comes from
-Intikam (again)

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28451
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #776 on: June 17, 2016, 11:28:16 AM »
No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle?
Because the bottle is not porous enough to allow air nor liquid to pass through it, just inside of it.

If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it?
It would mix due to the glass being in an expanded state upon heating.

WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE?
They can be depending on the severity of a high verses low pressure differential.

How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)?
Name me something that can work in a vacuum that you can absolutely verify.
Also, things can work in lower pressure environments because it's still atmosphere.

Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air?
Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot.

Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
Pushing on anything displaces air all the time, no matter what. It's why we are alive and it's why anything and everything moves. High V low pressure differences.

Now you're trapped. If the bottle is porous enough to let air get in the interior of it, then what if I cut the glass in half? Surely now the air can get through it!

"It would mix due to the glass being in an expanded state upon heating."

WTF does that even mean? Seriously, you have to explain it.

"They can be depending on the severity of a high verses low pressure differential."


First of all, that doesn't make sense. Second, if you haven't yet realized it, wind often moves faster than your legs on a swing. If moving your legs on a swing is enough to push yourself, wind should be able to throw you around as if you weren't anything at all.

"Name me something that can work in a vacuum that you can absolutely verify."

What do you mean by "can work"? I know things can fall for a start, and that things weigh the same.

"Also, things can work in lower pressure environments because it's still atmosphere."


Yes, but they would work much different. Their mass for a start would be much lower, as they would displace much less air.

"Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot."


I can show you that the force required to get you from being stationary to swinging is so much that you'd be able to AT LEAST feel less heavy as you swing your arms around, but I'm not going to do that. Instead, what I will do is tell you this: if I am sitting on a cart or on ice skates or something similar (that would "take my weight"), I should be able to propel myself by "swimming" through the air, and very fast.

"Pushing on anything displaces air all the time, no matter what. It's why we are alive and it's why anything and everything moves. High V low pressure differences."

HOW does it displace air?
If you think I'm gonna repeat stuff to you again, you are sadly mistaken.
You can't grasp anything unless it's fed to you by your so called scientific idols.
What a waste of time you are.

*

sokarul

  • 18943
  • Extra Racist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #777 on: June 17, 2016, 11:36:03 AM »

 A 1 m3 block of water only weighs 1 tonne but displaces the same amount of atmosphere.  How can 14.7 psi of atmosphere make same size blocks of iron and water have such different weights?
Porousity.
  Mass is a measure of how much stuff there is.  Density is how much stuff per unit of volume.  1 kg of air and 1 kg of lead have the same mass, but vastly different densities.
Yep.

Actually, weight is how much force a given mass exerts at a given acceleration (usually due to gravitation).
Nope.
Displacement, on the other hand, is a measure of how much volume an object takes up when immersed in a fluid.  It's handy for figuring out the density of oddly shaped and/or porous objects.
Keep this in mind and you have an excellent chance of understanding why gravity is bullshit and why atmospheric pressure is the key to everything.
A cubic meter of lead and copper both displace the same amount of water.  Simarly a 1cu m. block of lead covered with a thin layerof copper.
You're making this really difficult for yourself.

No, YOU are making this really difficult for yourself. If everything is so porous, why can I not blow through a bottle? If I put a solid piece of glass in a chamber filled with a colored gas, would it then take the color of the gas because of absorbing it? WHY AREN'T GUSTS OF WIND COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE? How do things work in a vacuum/much lower air pressure (don't tell me you can't do that, you obviously can)? Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air? Are you even remotely serious when you say that interactions between bodies such as pushing on a wall happen because somehow air is displaced?
If what he said was true, anaerobic conditions wouldn't exist. Yet so many industries use them.
Why wouldn't they exist?
We already had this argument long ago. If air freely passes through less dense objects, then vacuum packing and other anaerobic conditions can't exist.
Who said air passes freely through less dense objects?

I said it passes more freely through POROUS objects.
Yes, so like I said, vacuum sealing and other aneroid conditions couldn't exist. But they do.

Denpessure was destroyed long ago. Did you forget "den" stood for density?
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

?

Papa Legba

  • Ranters
  • 9566
  • Welcome to the CIA Troll/Shill Society.
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #778 on: June 17, 2016, 11:42:32 AM »
Not gonna let any of you forget about this, cos it's the absolute crux of your mad bullshit:

Number of objects a rocket is: TWO.

All your mad bullshit summed up in one mad bullshit sentence...

Oh, sorry, according to your mad bullshit math it was TWO mad bullshit sentences, wasn't it?

You mad bullshitter.
I got Trolled & Shilled at the CIA Troll/Shill Society and now I feel EPIC!!!

*

sokarul

  • 18943
  • Extra Racist
Re: Newtons third law
« Reply #779 on: June 17, 2016, 11:45:09 AM »
Not gonna let any of you forget about this, cos it's the absolute crux of your mad bullshit:

Number of objects a rocket is: TWO.

All your mad bullshit summed up in one mad bullshit sentence...

Oh, sorry, according to your mad bullshit math it was TWO mad bullshit sentences, wasn't it?

You mad bullshitter.
Object B is the exhaust.
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.