Santiago/Sydney Flight

  • 36 Replies
  • 11077 Views
Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2016, 06:02:34 AM »
You'd think the flat-earth movement could crowdfund the thousand dollars or so needed to send a flat-earther from Sydney to Santiago and back. I can only guess they're chronically tightfisted.

I guess they could sneakily fit faster engines to the plane, but that would also mean sonic booms are also a myth.

I read a great hypothesis the other day. The 'magnetic mountain' at the north pole slows down flights in the northern hemisphere. I didn't realise aluminium and titanium were very magnetic, but it just shows how deep this conspiracy goes.

*

Son of Orospu

  • Jura's b*tch and proud of it!
  • Planar Moderator
  • 37820
  • I have artificial intelligence
Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2016, 07:39:47 AM »
You'd think the flat-earth movement could crowdfund the thousand dollars or so needed to send a flat-earther from Sydney to Santiago and back. I can only guess they're chronically tightfisted.

I guess they could sneakily fit faster engines to the plane, but that would also mean sonic booms are also a myth.

I read a great hypothesis the other day. The 'magnetic mountain' at the north pole slows down flights in the northern hemisphere. I didn't realise aluminium and titanium were very magnetic, but it just shows how deep this conspiracy goes.

Aluminum and titanium are made into electromagnets every day.  Especially copper is used for electromagnets.  Did you not attend you high school physics class?

Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2016, 08:27:43 AM »
Aluminum and titanium are made into electromagnets every day.  Especially copper is used for electromagnets.  Did you not attend you high school physics class?

I did. Hence my use of the word 'very'.

*

rabinoz

  • 24746
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #33 on: April 18, 2016, 04:27:24 AM »
You'd think the flat-earth movement could crowdfund the thousand dollars or so needed to send a flat-earther from Sydney to Santiago and back. I can only guess they're chronically tightfisted.

I guess they could sneakily fit faster engines to the plane, but that would also mean sonic booms are also a myth.

I read a great hypothesis the other day. The 'magnetic mountain' at the north pole slows down flights in the northern hemisphere. I didn't realise aluminium and titanium were very magnetic, but it just shows how deep this conspiracy goes.

Aluminum and titanium are made into electromagnets every day.  Especially copper is used for electromagnets.  Did you not attend you high school physics class?
Aluminium and titanium are NOT very magnetic, so the statement is 100% correct! So stop being ridiculously "pedantic" and making yourself look a fool.
A good measure of how magnetic a material is would be the relative permeability (μ/μ0) - you did remember that bit?
For a very magnetic material we would expect μ/μ0
  > 1,000 and even up to 1,000,000
For titanium μ/μ0
  = 1.00005
For aluminium μ/μ0
  = 1.000022
For air μ/μ0
  = 1.0000004
For a vacuum μ/μ0
  = 1.000000
So, both Titanium and Aluminium are so close to non-magnetic that only someone trying to mislead would try to deny it.

Now, of course any electrical conductor could by used to make an electromagnet. The best materials though would have a very low electrical resistivity and a low density (light weight).
Titanium has a relatively high electrical resistivity (420 nΩm), though fairly low density (4.506 g/cm3),
Aluminum has a relatively low electrical resistivity (28.2 nΩ nΩm), and a low density (2.70 g/cm3) and
Copper has low electrical resistivity (16.78 nΩm), but has a high density (8.96 g/cm3).

So of these three,  aluminium or copper would be good metals for the windings of an electromagnet, but I can see nowhere that titanium might be used.  Of course jroa in his wisdom might suggest a use.

So, expert jroa is absolutely wrong implying that titanium and aluminium might be very magnetic - yes I know he did not explicitly say that, just tried his supposed superior knowledge to demean Mister  B.
Right down to your usual tactics of dragging down and adding as little information as possible.



Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #34 on: April 19, 2016, 12:22:52 PM »

[/quote]
Except is rare cases, using a flat map to plot an optimum course will lead you astray unless you know what you're doing.
Quote

Funny, all aircraft and submersibles use a flat map to navigate. Would love to hear more about those rare cases...

*

rabinoz

  • 24746
  • Real Earth Believer
Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #35 on: April 19, 2016, 07:37:42 PM »
I don't disbelieve it's a globe, it could be, yes the works for flights to santiago from sydney.

I got roughly 8000-9000 miles considering Australia is about 2,500 miles wide, which on that map australia is covered by roughly 4 of them marker squares/rectangles, taking that into consideration, I divided 2,500 by 4, got 625. So concluded that one of those squares is about 625 miles, so I followed around 14 squares, then multiplied 14 by 625 and got 8750, roughly?!

I know it's not perfect, so the map is not correct according to the globe, but it's close, and maybe with a bit of tweaking it can be made fit!

Flat Earthers seem to think of a flat disc?! But it's not, also, it may not be a sphere either.

I'll continue to find facts and then i'll come to my conclusion, but right now i'm in between!

Oh, and i'm not a flat earther, i'm more of a cylindrical type earther haha

I have the perfect solution for you! The "Half Orange" Earth!

The Southern Hemisphere is just that a Hemisphere, as I know it is. I live here and done quite a few measurements around Australia that all fit perfectly with the Globe and not within thousands of kilometers of Flat Earth distances.
The Northern Hemiplane can be a plane for all I care! I don't have to live there and the distances are not "violently out" - just a "lot out"!

Re: Santiago/Sydney Flight
« Reply #36 on: April 20, 2016, 07:08:03 PM »
Except is rare cases, using a flat map to plot an optimum course will lead you astray unless you know what you're doing.
Funny, all aircraft and submersibles use a flat map to navigate. Would love to hear more about those rare cases...

[Fixed your quotes. If this was done incorrectly, please say so]

The people planning long-distance routes for submarines and aircraft know what they're doing.

With routes that cover only short distances, most of the time a straight line on a flat map will give a non-optimal route; the difference may be small if the route is short, but it's still non-optimal. Optimal in this context means shortest.

One of the rare cases is an azimuthal map centered on the origin or destination, or, even more rarely, centered on a point along the great-circle path that connects the origin and destination. Another of the rare cases would be a Mercator or similar projection with a path anywhere that's due north or south, or due east or west along the Equator.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan