That infamous moment in Satanic Popular Science : Why the blue moon occur?

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wise

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When you search about "blue moon occuring", you experience the following information like these:

Quote
There is a 'Blue Moon' occuring on the 20th of August. A 'Blue Moon' does not necessarily mean that the Moon will appear to be the color blue.

Instead, this term usually refers to the second full moon occuring within the same month. In this case, though, a Blue Moon is the third Full Moon in a four Moon season. Since tonight's Full Moon is the third of four this season, it is considered a Blue Moon by this standard.

google: "how is a blue moon occur" https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=how%20is%20a%20blue%20moon%20occur

google answer:

Quote
Two full moons in one month may occur in any month out of the year except for February, which is shorter than the lunar cycle. The other, older blue moon event, which happens when there are four full moons in a season, last occurred Aug. 21, 2013.

As you see that there is no information about "why?"

google: "why is a blue moon occur". https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=why+is+a+blue+moon+occur

google answer:
Quote
The Maine Farmers' Almanac called the third full moon in a season that had four the "blue moon". In modern use, when 13 full moons occur in a year, usually one calendar month has two full moons; the second one is called a "blue moon".

As a result there is no reason they can explain why the blue moon occur? They just explain "when it occur" like a calendar.  :D

Because they have no logical explanation.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2016, 06:14:32 AM by İntikam »


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wise

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At last, i found a nonsence to try the explain to occuring it.  ;D

Quote
A Moon that actually looks blue, however, is a very rare sight. The Moon, full or any other phase, can appear blue when the atmosphere is filled with dust or smoke particles of a certain size; slightly wider than 0.7 micron. The particles scatter the red light making the Moon appear blue in color, this can happen for instance after a dust storm, forest fire or a volcanic eruption.

Eruptions like on Mt. Krakatoa, Indonesia (1883), El Chichon, Mexico (1983), Mt. St. Helens (1980) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) are all known to have caused blue moons.

http://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/moon/blue-moon.html

Everytime same thing. "Some particuls causes..."  ;D

I can explain everything by particuls. For example.

"Why is the earth flat?" My answer: "Because the flat particuls are major in the earth".  ;D  :D  ;D
« Last Edit: April 18, 2016, 06:22:24 AM by İntikam »


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Blue_Moon

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When you search about "blue moon occuring", you experience the following information like these:

Quote
There is a 'Blue Moon' occuring on the 20th of August. A 'Blue Moon' does not necessarily mean that the Moon will appear to be the color blue.

Instead, this term usually refers to the second full moon occuring within the same month. In this case, though, a Blue Moon is the third Full Moon in a four Moon season. Since tonight's Full Moon is the third of four this season, it is considered a Blue Moon by this standard.

google: "how is a blue moon occur" https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=how%20is%20a%20blue%20moon%20occur

google answer:

Quote
Two full moons in one month may occur in any month out of the year except for February, which is shorter than the lunar cycle. The other, older blue moon event, which happens when there are four full moons in a season, last occurred Aug. 21, 2013.

As you see that there is no information about "why?"

google: "why is a blue moon occur". https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=why+is+a+blue+moon+occur

google answer:
Quote
The Maine Farmers' Almanac called the third full moon in a season that had four the "blue moon". In modern use, when 13 full moons occur in a year, usually one calendar month has two full moons; the second one is called a "blue moon".

As a result there is no reason they can explain why the blue moon occur? They just explain "when it occur" like a calendar.  :D

Because they have no logical explanation.

The BlueMoon appears because he can't stand bullshit like this on the internet. 

The blue moon is just a name for the event of a certain number of full moons happening during an arbitrary timespan of ours.  There's no need for "why," because it's an entirely arbitrary event that has more to do with our own calendars than anything with the moon.  It's not a distinct celestial occurrence like an eclipse. 
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wise

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This is a blue moon. The colour of the moon is blue.



When you search about "blue moon occuring", you experience the following information like these:

Quote
There is a 'Blue Moon' occuring on the 20th of August. A 'Blue Moon' does not necessarily mean that the Moon will appear to be the color blue.

Instead, this term usually refers to the second full moon occuring within the same month. In this case, though, a Blue Moon is the third Full Moon in a four Moon season. Since tonight's Full Moon is the third of four this season, it is considered a Blue Moon by this standard.

google: "how is a blue moon occur" https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=how%20is%20a%20blue%20moon%20occur

google answer:

Quote
Two full moons in one month may occur in any month out of the year except for February, which is shorter than the lunar cycle. The other, older blue moon event, which happens when there are four full moons in a season, last occurred Aug. 21, 2013.

As you see that there is no information about "why?"

google: "why is a blue moon occur". https://www.google.com/?ion=1&espv=2#q=why+is+a+blue+moon+occur

google answer:
Quote
The Maine Farmers' Almanac called the third full moon in a season that had four the "blue moon". In modern use, when 13 full moons occur in a year, usually one calendar month has two full moons; the second one is called a "blue moon".

As a result there is no reason they can explain why the blue moon occur? They just explain "when it occur" like a calendar.  :D

Because they have no logical explanation.

The BlueMoon appears because he can't stand bullshit like this on the internet. 

The blue moon is just a name for the event of a certain number of full moons happening during an arbitrary timespan of ours.  There's no need for "why," because it's an entirely arbitrary event that has more to do with our own calendars than anything with the moon.  It's not a distinct celestial occurrence like an eclipse.

Nobody asked you what are bullshits thinking abot this matter?

You do not insult the issues means that you know . You're turning into a human .

I wonder when will you return to an animal like your original shape ?
« Last Edit: April 18, 2016, 06:29:48 AM by İntikam »


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sokarul

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Blue moons are not blue. Like your sources say, it's just the second full moon of the month. The name changes to harvest moon when it's around the Equinox. This does not mean the shramp are harvested off the moon.
Sokarul

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wise

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Blue moons are not blue. Like your sources say, it's just the second full moon of the month. The name changes to harvest moon when it's around the Equinox. This does not mean the shramp are harvested off the moon.

Blue is blue. Do not ridicule to people. If you really serious, then you accpet the populer science is just a kidding.


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Blue_Moon

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Blue moons are not blue. Like your sources say, it's just the second full moon of the month. The name changes to harvest moon when it's around the Equinox. This does not mean the shramp are harvested off the moon.

Blue is blue. Do not ridicule to people. If you really serious, then you accept the popular science is just a kidding.
Blue moons are not blue!  They look the same as any other full moon!
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markjo

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A blue moon occurs when a smurf drops his pants.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

A blue moon occurs when a smurf drops his pants.

LOL!

But if a smurf drops his pants and there's no one there to see it, is it still a blue moon?

Sorry... back on topic...

When you search about "blue moon occuring", you experience the following information like these:

Quote
There is a 'Blue Moon' occuring on the 20th of August. A 'Blue Moon' does not necessarily mean that the Moon will appear to be the color blue.

Instead, this term usually refers to the second full moon occuring within the same month. In this case, though, a Blue Moon is the third Full Moon in a four Moon season. Since tonight's Full Moon is the third of four this season, it is considered a Blue Moon by this standard.
...

Quote
Two full moons in one month may occur in any month out of the year except for February, which is shorter than the lunar cycle. The other, older blue moon event, which happens when there are four full moons in a season, last occurred Aug. 21, 2013.
...

Quote
The Maine Farmers' Almanac called the third full moon in a season that had four the "blue moon". In modern use, when 13 full moons occur in a year, usually one calendar month has two full moons; the second one is called a "blue moon".

As a result there is no reason they can explain why the blue moon occur? They just explain "when it occur" like a calendar.  :D

Because they have no logical explanation.

There is no logical explanation. No one knows why they're called Blue Moons. They just are.

Quote from: (attributed to) Abraham Lincoln
How many legs does a dog have, if you call the tail a leg? Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn't make it a leg.

Come to think of it, markjo's observation is maybe more useful than the OP's.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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sokarul

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Blue moons are not blue. Like your sources say, it's just the second full moon of the month. The name changes to harvest moon when it's around the Equinox. This does not mean the shramp are harvested off the moon.

Blue is blue. Do not ridicule to people. If you really serious, then you accpet the populer science is just a kidding.

I'm not sure what you actually want out of this thread.
Do you want:
Why the second full moon in a month is called a blue moon?
Why you were able to find a picture of the moon looking blue?
How two full moons can even happen in one month?
Sokarul

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CaptainMagpie

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I think most of his issue is that English is not his first language and so he doesn't understand the vocabulary well and thinks that that means what is reading is wrong or purposely misleading just because he doesn't understand.
fuck off penguin.  I'll take my ban to tell you to go fuck your self.  Ban please.   I am waiting.

This is a blue moon. The colour of the moon is blue.


That certainly is a picture of the Moon with a blue cast. Who took the picture? Was the blue cast added in post-processing? That's easy to do. For instance...

Here it is as a red moon.



Now it's green.



Does that last picture prove the Moon is made of green cheese or something?

Thinking you can "prove" the color of something in a digital photo is fraught with peril unless you understand and can document all all the steps between the light leaving the object and the presented product. Something as simple as a colored filter in front of (or behind, or inside) the lens could produce the image you presented.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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wise

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Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !
« Last Edit: April 19, 2016, 01:24:10 AM by İntikam »


IT IS NIGHT. MINERS, EXPERT SABOTEURS AND TIS AGENTS ARE ACTIVATED. NIGHT ENDS AND DAY STARTS IN:

Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !



This is a photo I took of the moon in daylight... It looks kind of blue because of the scattered blue light in the atmosphere,

Maybe this is the "blue moon" that the scientists are referring to?

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wise

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Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !



This is a photo I took of the moon in daylight... It looks kind of blue because of the scattered blue light in the atmosphere,

Maybe this is the "blue moon" that the scientists are referring to?

I don't say this, this is NASA report.

Either accept what the scientists (!) say, or give back your salary to NASA.


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Woody

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Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !

Did you miss this part in what you linked:

"One way to make a blue moon: use a blue filter. That's what Kostian Iftica did on July 2nd when he photographed this full moon rising over Brighton, Mass."

That is the description for this picture in the article:



"But will it really be blue? Probably not. The date of a full moon, all by itself, doesn't affect the moon's color. The moon on July 31st will be pearly-gray, as usual. Unless....
There was a time, not long ago, when people saw blue moons almost every night. Full moons, half moons, crescent moons--they were all blue, except some nights when they were green.
The time was 1883, the year an Indonesian volcano named Krakatoa exploded. ....Plumes of ash rose to the very top of Earth's atmosphere. And the moon turned blue."

"The key to a blue moon is having in the air lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micron)--and no other sizes present. This is rare, but volcanoes sometimes spit out such clouds, as do forest fires:"

Blue moon is an expression to express rarity of an event.  It's orgins is somewhat questionable and used to mean something was absurd. 

From what I can find for the phrases origin:

"The first known recorded use of a form of the phrase is in an anti-clerical pamphlet published in 1528 by William Roy and Jeremy Barlowe."

It was to express the absurdity of believing things that simple observations prove are false.

It finally became to mean something rarely happening since the moon can appear to be blue during very specific and rare circumstances that were recorded and documented later in history.


Seems when the moon appears to be blue it is for the same reason the sky appears to be blue.

I am thinking since English is not your native language somethings are being lost to you in translation. 


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wise

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Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !

Did you miss this part in what you linked:

"One way to make a blue moon: use a blue filter. That's what Kostian Iftica did on July 2nd when he photographed this full moon rising over Brighton, Mass."

That is the description for this picture in the article:



"But will it really be blue? Probably not. The date of a full moon, all by itself, doesn't affect the moon's color. The moon on July 31st will be pearly-gray, as usual. Unless....
There was a time, not long ago, when people saw blue moons almost every night. Full moons, half moons, crescent moons--they were all blue, except some nights when they were green.
The time was 1883, the year an Indonesian volcano named Krakatoa exploded. ....Plumes of ash rose to the very top of Earth's atmosphere. And the moon turned blue."

"The key to a blue moon is having in the air lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micron)--and no other sizes present. This is rare, but volcanoes sometimes spit out such clouds, as do forest fires:"

Blue moon is an expression to express rarity of an event.  It's orgins is somewhat questionable and used to mean something was absurd. 

From what I can find for the phrases origin:

"The first known recorded use of a form of the phrase is in an anti-clerical pamphlet published in 1528 by William Roy and Jeremy Barlowe."

It was to express the absurdity of believing things that simple observations prove are false.

It finally became to mean something rarely happening since the moon can appear to be blue during very specific and rare circumstances that were recorded and documented later in history.


Seems when the moon appears to be blue it is for the same reason the sky appears to be blue.

I am thinking since English is not your native language somethings are being lost to you in translation.

You are resisting to dont understand what your God NASA say you:

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Think again Or or you're fired.  ;D



IT IS NIGHT. MINERS, EXPERT SABOTEURS AND TIS AGENTS ARE ACTIVATED. NIGHT ENDS AND DAY STARTS IN:

Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !

Did you miss this part in what you linked:

"One way to make a blue moon: use a blue filter. That's what Kostian Iftica did on July 2nd when he photographed this full moon rising over Brighton, Mass."

That is the description for this picture in the article:



"But will it really be blue? Probably not. The date of a full moon, all by itself, doesn't affect the moon's color. The moon on July 31st will be pearly-gray, as usual. Unless....
There was a time, not long ago, when people saw blue moons almost every night. Full moons, half moons, crescent moons--they were all blue, except some nights when they were green.
The time was 1883, the year an Indonesian volcano named Krakatoa exploded. ....Plumes of ash rose to the very top of Earth's atmosphere. And the moon turned blue."

"The key to a blue moon is having in the air lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micron)--and no other sizes present. This is rare, but volcanoes sometimes spit out such clouds, as do forest fires:"

Blue moon is an expression to express rarity of an event.  It's orgins is somewhat questionable and used to mean something was absurd. 

From what I can find for the phrases origin:

"The first known recorded use of a form of the phrase is in an anti-clerical pamphlet published in 1528 by William Roy and Jeremy Barlowe."

It was to express the absurdity of believing things that simple observations prove are false.

It finally became to mean something rarely happening since the moon can appear to be blue during very specific and rare circumstances that were recorded and documented later in history.


Seems when the moon appears to be blue it is for the same reason the sky appears to be blue.

I am thinking since English is not your native language somethings are being lost to you in translation.

You are resisting to dont understand what your God NASA say you:

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Think again Or or you're fired.  ;D

EVERY example of a "Blue Moon" in this article is referring to some sort of filtering process that makes it look blue!

If you can't understand English to the extent that you can't read the articles or understand responses in plain English then stick to Turkish forums.

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Woody

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Quote
In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition says a Blue Moon is the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see an actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common!
http://earthsky.org/space/when-is-the-next-blue-moon

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Nasa talked. In other words one of the your Gods!

Now all you shut up and count your salary !

Did you miss this part in what you linked:

"One way to make a blue moon: use a blue filter. That's what Kostian Iftica did on July 2nd when he photographed this full moon rising over Brighton, Mass."

That is the description for this picture in the article:



"But will it really be blue? Probably not. The date of a full moon, all by itself, doesn't affect the moon's color. The moon on July 31st will be pearly-gray, as usual. Unless....
There was a time, not long ago, when people saw blue moons almost every night. Full moons, half moons, crescent moons--they were all blue, except some nights when they were green.
The time was 1883, the year an Indonesian volcano named Krakatoa exploded. ....Plumes of ash rose to the very top of Earth's atmosphere. And the moon turned blue."

"The key to a blue moon is having in the air lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micron)--and no other sizes present. This is rare, but volcanoes sometimes spit out such clouds, as do forest fires:"

Blue moon is an expression to express rarity of an event.  It's orgins is somewhat questionable and used to mean something was absurd. 

From what I can find for the phrases origin:

"The first known recorded use of a form of the phrase is in an anti-clerical pamphlet published in 1528 by William Roy and Jeremy Barlowe."

It was to express the absurdity of believing things that simple observations prove are false.

It finally became to mean something rarely happening since the moon can appear to be blue during very specific and rare circumstances that were recorded and documented later in history.


Seems when the moon appears to be blue it is for the same reason the sky appears to be blue.

I am thinking since English is not your native language somethings are being lost to you in translation.

You are resisting to dont understand what your God NASA say you:

Quote
The month of July 2004 has two full moons, which means one of them is a Blue Moon. But will it really be blue? Believe it or not, scientists say blue-colored moons are real.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2004/07jul_bluemoon/

Think again Or or you're fired.  ;D

Why not explain what the article is saying to me.  Obviously your understanding of English must be better than mine.

When I read:

"But will it really be blue? Probably not." 

I believe it is saying the moon will most likely not appear to be blue.

"The moon on July 31st will be pearly-gray, as usual."

No mention of it appearing to be blue.  It states that it would appear grayish as usual.  Unless my understanding of English is severely limited.

"There was a time, not long ago, when people saw blue moons almost every night."

Well here we them saying at some point in history the moon appeared to be blue.

"The time was 1883, the year an Indonesian volcano named Krakatoa exploded."

Here the article is stating when and the event that took place.

"The key to a blue moon is having in the air lots of particles slightly wider than the wavelength of red light (0.7 micron)--and no other sizes present. This is rare, but volcanoes sometimes spit out such clouds, as do forest fires:"

Here it explains why and that explanation seems very similar to why the sky appears to be blue during the day.

I would take the advice of another poster and stick to getting information from sources that use your native language.  You seem to have some trouble with understanding English.


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Uninvited Guest

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  • A clone cloned by a smartphone
‘Blue moon’ is polysemic: it can be both the name of the second full moon in a month and the real transformation of its color. Only recently it was used to name this phase of the lunar calendar. Before that, 'Blue Moon' refers to the color change, witnessed by people around the world. What is in dispute is whether this change is actually occurring on the moon itself or not. It is believed that particus alter its color through optical illusion. I’m gonna highlight the segment “it is believed”. There are so many uncertainties on the subject that this is just a wild guess.

What follows comes from: http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/amoonb.html

"There is a book, in German, called 'Die Welt des Mondes' by R. Oldenbourg published in 1957, which includes an article apparently written by Patrick Moore in 'Guide to the Moon' printed in 1953 by Eyre and Spottiswoode. Steffens remarks that at his institute there are witnesses ( a Professor Isserstedt) who actually saw a Blue Moon in the year 1954. It was BLUE, not bluish or powder blue, but BLUE. Patrick Moore's article described several sightings of Blue Moons in 1944 in America, in 1949 in Queensland, and in England on September 26, 1950. According to Moore who witnessed the 1950 event, 'The moon was in a slightly misty sky and had a kind of lovely blue color comparable to the electric glow discharge. I never saw something similar before'."

"Apparently this phenomenon has been reported by many people all over the world. It is believed that dust in the atmosphere at very high altitudes causes it, and the event in 1950 seen in England may have been produced by an unusually heavy season of forest fires in Canada around the same time. The actual cause may have to do with selective absorption of moonlight by soot particles of the right size, rather than by scattering which accounts for why the sky is blue in the daytime. The term 'blue moon' may indeed have something to do with rare atmospheric conditions perhaps caused by distant forest fires or other 'soot like' particle sources which may be effective in preferentially scattering red light rather than blue light (the normal situation during a sunset)."
« Last Edit: April 19, 2016, 01:06:19 PM by Uninvited Guest »
The science in her trance will make the sign of cross
And we will light bonfires to appreciate the electric bulb.

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Blue_Moon

  • 846
  • Defender of NASA
‘Blue moon’ is polysemic: it can be both the name of the second full moon in a month and the real transformation of its color. Only recently it was used to name this phase of the lunar calendar. Before that, 'Blue Moon' refers to the color change, witnessed by people around the world. What is in dispute is whether this change is actually occurring on the moon itself or not. It is believed that particus alter its color through optical illusion. I’m gonna highlight the segment “it is believed”. There are so many uncertainties on the subject that this is just a wild guess.

What follows comes from: http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/amoonb.html

"There is a book, in German, called 'Die Welt des Mondes' by R. Oldenbourg published in 1957, which includes an article apparently written by Patrick Moore in 'Guide to the Moon' printed in 1953 by Eyre and Spottiswoode. Steffens remarks that at his institute there are witnesses ( a Professor Isserstedt) who actually saw a Blue Moon in the year 1954. It was BLUE, not bluish or powder blue, but BLUE. Patrick Moore's article described several sightings of Blue Moons in 1944 in America, in 1949 in Queensland, and in England on September 26, 1950. According to Moore who witnessed the 1950 event, 'The moon was in a slightly misty sky and had a kind of lovely blue color comparable to the electric glow discharge. I never saw something similar before'."

"Apparently this phenomenon has been reported by many people all over the world. It is believed that dust in the atmosphere at very high altitudes causes it, and the event in 1950 seen in England may have been produced by an unusually heavy season of forest fires in Canada around the same time. The actual cause may have to do with selective absorption of moonlight by soot particles of the right size, rather than by scattering which accounts for why the sky is blue in the daytime. The term 'blue moon' may indeed have something to do with rare atmospheric conditions perhaps caused by distant forest fires or other 'soot like' particle sources which may be effective in preferentially scattering red light rather than blue light (the normal situation during a sunset)."
You talk like a literal blue moon happened on a regular basis, but the passage you cite makes it pretty clear that this was an unusual occurrence.  There's no evidence that the phrase ever originally referred to a literal blue moon. 
Here's a better explanation for why it's called a "blue moon." 
Quote from: Wikipedia
The suggestion has been made that the term "blue moon" for "intercalary month" arose by folk etymology, the "blue" replacing the no-longer-understood belewe, 'to betray'. The original meaning would then have been "betrayer moon", referring to a full moon that would "normally" (in years without an intercalary month) be the full moon of spring, while in an intercalary year, it was "traitorous" in the sense that people would have had to continue fasting for another month in accordance with the season of Lent.
Aerospace Engineering Student
NASA Enthusiast
Round Earth Advocate
More qualified to speak for NASA than you are to speak against them

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Uninvited Guest

  • 213
  • A clone cloned by a smartphone
‘Blue moon’ is polysemic: it can be both the name of the second full moon in a month and the real transformation of its color. Only recently it was used to name this phase of the lunar calendar. Before that, 'Blue Moon' refers to the color change, witnessed by people around the world. What is in dispute is whether this change is actually occurring on the moon itself or not. It is believed that particus alter its color through optical illusion. I’m gonna highlight the segment “it is believed”. There are so many uncertainties on the subject that this is just a wild guess.

What follows comes from: http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/amoonb.html

"There is a book, in German, called 'Die Welt des Mondes' by R. Oldenbourg published in 1957, which includes an article apparently written by Patrick Moore in 'Guide to the Moon' printed in 1953 by Eyre and Spottiswoode. Steffens remarks that at his institute there are witnesses ( a Professor Isserstedt) who actually saw a Blue Moon in the year 1954. It was BLUE, not bluish or powder blue, but BLUE. Patrick Moore's article described several sightings of Blue Moons in 1944 in America, in 1949 in Queensland, and in England on September 26, 1950. According to Moore who witnessed the 1950 event, 'The moon was in a slightly misty sky and had a kind of lovely blue color comparable to the electric glow discharge. I never saw something similar before'."

"Apparently this phenomenon has been reported by many people all over the world. It is believed that dust in the atmosphere at very high altitudes causes it, and the event in 1950 seen in England may have been produced by an unusually heavy season of forest fires in Canada around the same time. The actual cause may have to do with selective absorption of moonlight by soot particles of the right size, rather than by scattering which accounts for why the sky is blue in the daytime. The term 'blue moon' may indeed have something to do with rare atmospheric conditions perhaps caused by distant forest fires or other 'soot like' particle sources which may be effective in preferentially scattering red light rather than blue light (the normal situation during a sunset)."
You talk like a literal blue moon happened on a regular basis, but the passage you cite makes it pretty clear that this was an unusual occurrence.  There's no evidence that the phrase ever originally referred to a literal blue moon. 
Here's a better explanation for why it's called a "blue moon." 
Quote from: Wikipedia
The suggestion has been made that the term "blue moon" for "intercalary month" arose by folk etymology, the "blue" replacing the no-longer-understood belewe, 'to betray'. The original meaning would then have been "betrayer moon", referring to a full moon that would "normally" (in years without an intercalary month) be the full moon of spring, while in an intercalary year, it was "traitorous" in the sense that people would have had to continue fasting for another month in accordance with the season of Lent.

There is evidence; Patrick Moore has witnessed it(2). Put your glasses on please old man.
But ok, nevermind. Lets accept your explanation in turn, if this makes you feel better.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 07:36:11 AM by Uninvited Guest »
The science in her trance will make the sign of cross
And we will light bonfires to appreciate the electric bulb.

*

Blue_Moon

  • 846
  • Defender of NASA
‘Blue moon’ is polysemic: it can be both the name of the second full moon in a month and the real transformation of its color. Only recently it was used to name this phase of the lunar calendar. Before that, 'Blue Moon' refers to the color change, witnessed by people around the world. What is in dispute is whether this change is actually occurring on the moon itself or not. It is believed that particus alter its color through optical illusion. I’m gonna highlight the segment “it is believed”. There are so many uncertainties on the subject that this is just a wild guess.

What follows comes from: http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/amoonb.html

"There is a book, in German, called 'Die Welt des Mondes' by R. Oldenbourg published in 1957, which includes an article apparently written by Patrick Moore in 'Guide to the Moon' printed in 1953 by Eyre and Spottiswoode. Steffens remarks that at his institute there are witnesses ( a Professor Isserstedt) who actually saw a Blue Moon in the year 1954. It was BLUE, not bluish or powder blue, but BLUE. Patrick Moore's article described several sightings of Blue Moons in 1944 in America, in 1949 in Queensland, and in England on September 26, 1950. According to Moore who witnessed the 1950 event, 'The moon was in a slightly misty sky and had a kind of lovely blue color comparable to the electric glow discharge. I never saw something similar before'."

"Apparently this phenomenon has been reported by many people all over the world. It is believed that dust in the atmosphere at very high altitudes causes it, and the event in 1950 seen in England may have been produced by an unusually heavy season of forest fires in Canada around the same time. The actual cause may have to do with selective absorption of moonlight by soot particles of the right size, rather than by scattering which accounts for why the sky is blue in the daytime. The term 'blue moon' may indeed have something to do with rare atmospheric conditions perhaps caused by distant forest fires or other 'soot like' particle sources which may be effective in preferentially scattering red light rather than blue light (the normal situation during a sunset)."
You talk like a literal blue moon happened on a regular basis, but the passage you cite makes it pretty clear that this was an unusual occurrence.  There's no evidence that the phrase ever originally referred to a literal blue moon. 
Here's a better explanation for why it's called a "blue moon." 
Quote from: Wikipedia
The suggestion has been made that the term "blue moon" for "intercalary month" arose by folk etymology, the "blue" replacing the no-longer-understood belewe, 'to betray'. The original meaning would then have been "betrayer moon", referring to a full moon that would "normally" (in years without an intercalary month) be the full moon of spring, while in an intercalary year, it was "traitorous" in the sense that people would have had to continue fasting for another month in accordance with the season of Lent.

There is evidence; Patrick Moore has witnessed it(2). Put your glasses on please old man.
But ok, nevermind. Lets accept your explanation in turn, if this makes you feel better.
"Old"?  Who are you calling old?  Did you not read that my sig says "Aerospace engineering student?"  [shakes cane]

Sure, there have been several reported observations of literal blue moons in the past.  However, if they had been caused by the moon itself, they would have been observed all over the world.  The term "blue moon" has nothing to do with the moon's color.  How many times will you have to be told before you understand?
Aerospace Engineering Student
NASA Enthusiast
Round Earth Advocate
More qualified to speak for NASA than you are to speak against them