How does the UA model explain gravity waves.

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How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« on: February 15, 2016, 04:39:17 PM »
The equivalence principle can't explain this one, so I guess like the result of any non local experiment it's going to be a force made by the stars.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2016, 08:00:10 PM »
GR can't explain gravity waves.  Why do you think that you are so much smarter than Einstein?

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2016, 12:43:31 AM »
GR can't explain gravity waves.  Why do you think that you are so much smarter than Einstein?

The General Theory of Relativity, and the other theories on relativity combined explains this very well. In fact, these theories were the indication that GW actually existed.

But you didn't even try to answer the question. How can GW exist in a universe with no gravity, and what we feel as gravity is an accelerational illusion? GW shouldn't exist.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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mikeman7918

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2016, 10:33:18 AM »
GR can't explain gravity waves.  Why do you think that you are so much smarter than Einstein?

The experiment that detected gravitational waves was set up because GR literally PREDICTED the existance of gravitational waves.

The equivalence principle can't explain this one, so I guess like the result of any non local experiment it's going to be a force made by the stars.

Fortionately, relativity consists of more then just the equivalence principle.  The gravitational wave detection experiment was definitely not in a sufficiantly small region of space as the equivalence principle requires because the thing is huge.  How would gravitational waves be explained without general relativity?
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2016, 11:54:50 AM »
The equivalence principle can't explain this one, so I guess like the result of any non local experiment it's going to be a force made by the stars.

Or it's all a conspiracy, there's always that option. Or aether.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2016, 01:03:32 PM »
The equivalence principle can't explain this one, so I guess like the result of any non local experiment it's going to be a force made by the stars.

Or it's all a conspiracy, there's always that option. Or aether.

You mean the scientists at LIGO laboratory published fake results on purpose, and more that 44 000 amataur astronomers kept their mouths shut about it. But that isn't even the biggest question that comes into mind, it's why they would do it.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2016, 01:14:05 PM »
But that isn't even the biggest question that comes into mind, it's why they would do it.
It's FET. They do it because if they didn't FEers would have no way to deny the evidence.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2016, 07:55:16 AM »
They do it because if they didn't FEers would have no way to deny the evidence.

So basically what you are saying is that this isn't just a flat earth society, it's also an anti science society.
Because it seems these people are just cavilling out of any scientific argument, using pseudo arguments to confuse well read people on any subject, one could go so far as calling it the pseudoscience society. And that's not even taking a count for all the trolls.

Maybe these trolls are evolved trolls. By this I mean the caviling people previously described are the trolls. And this is a plattform for educating pseudotrolls. Anyway these are just random thoughts generated by my quantum brain.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 09:15:26 AM by sircool »
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2016, 08:16:18 AM »
So basically what you are saying is that this isn't just a flat earth society, it's also an anti science society.
Or, to put it another way, it's a flat earth society.

Welcome to the forum. It's a fun place for hypothetical situations, just don't get too surprised at a few bizarre claims. Pretty much everyone's a troll: the few that aren't inevitably end up on other sites.


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Anyway these are just random thoughts generatorer by my quantum brain.
I will never get tired of how people seem to think 'quantum' is an appropriate word for any sufficiently profound statement. You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2016, 09:04:28 AM »
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anyway these are just random thoughts generated in my quantum brain
You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

No, that's your interpretation of my claim, because obviously you don't know how quantum superposition affects the cooperation between neurons in the brain to solve problems. But hey, superposition can't occur immediately every single time you try to combine some thoughts. Perhaps you just have to think a little longer about it.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 09:14:40 AM by sircool »
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2016, 10:42:35 AM »
Quote
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anyway these are just random thoughts generated in my quantum brain
You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

No, that's your interpretation of my claim, because obviously you don't know how quantum superposition affects the cooperation between neurons in the brain to solve problems. But hey, superposition can't occur immediately every single time you try to combine some thoughts. Perhaps you just have to think a little longer about it.
No, that's literally what quantum means: of or referring to very small quantities. Quantum isn't synonymous with quantum theory. Technically you'd need to throw in a 'mechanical' if you wanted to refer to the effects of quantum mechanics.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2016, 11:43:00 AM »
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anyway these are just random thoughts generated in my quantum brain
You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

No, that's your interpretation of my claim, because obviously you don't know how quantum superposition affects the cooperation between neurons in the brain to solve problems. But hey, superposition can't occur immediately every single time you try to combine some thoughts. Perhaps you just have to think a little longer about it.
No, that's literally what quantum means: of or referring to very small quantities. Quantum isn't synonymous with quantum theory. Technically you'd need to throw in a 'mechanical' if you wanted to refer to the effects of quantum mechanics.

Way to escape topic, bravo, Like a real troll. I can only imagine what space exploration would be like if escaping the earth's gravity was that easy.

But yeah, since you want to discuss definitions, here's one for you:

quan·tum  (kwŏn′təm)
n. pl. quan·ta (-tə)
1. Physics
a. The smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, especially a discrete quantity of electromagnetic radiation.
b. This amount of energy regarded as a unit.
2. A quantity or amount.
3. A specified portion.
4. Something that can be counted or measured.
5. A unit of acetylcholine, released at the synaptic cleft of a neuromuscular junction.


And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 11:50:47 AM by sircool »
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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FalseProphet

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2016, 12:12:18 PM »
Quote
Quote
anyway these are just random thoughts generated in my quantum brain
You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

No, that's your interpretation of my claim, because obviously you don't know how quantum superposition affects the cooperation between neurons in the brain to solve problems. But hey, superposition can't occur immediately every single time you try to combine some thoughts. Perhaps you just have to think a little longer about it.
No, that's literally what quantum means: of or referring to very small quantities. Quantum isn't synonymous with quantum theory. Technically you'd need to throw in a 'mechanical' if you wanted to refer to the effects of quantum mechanics.

Way to escape topic, bravo, Like a real troll. I can only imagine what space exploration would be like if escaping the earth's gravity was that easy.

But yeah, since you want to discuss definitions, here's one for you:

quan·tum  (kwŏn′təm)
n. pl. quan·ta (-tə)
1. Physics
a. The smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, especially a discrete quantity of electromagnetic radiation.
b. This amount of energy regarded as a unit.
2. A quantity or amount.
3. A specified portion.
4. Something that can be counted or measured.
5. A unit of acetylcholine, released at the synaptic cleft of a neuromuscular junction.


And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.

Can't you just give her that and be happy having a quantummechanical brain?

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2016, 12:24:40 PM »
Quote
Quote
anyway these are just random thoughts generated in my quantum brain
You do know you just said you have a very tiny brain, right?

No, that's your interpretation of my claim, because obviously you don't know how quantum superposition affects the cooperation between neurons in the brain to solve problems. But hey, superposition can't occur immediately every single time you try to combine some thoughts. Perhaps you just have to think a little longer about it.
No, that's literally what quantum means: of or referring to very small quantities. Quantum isn't synonymous with quantum theory. Technically you'd need to throw in a 'mechanical' if you wanted to refer to the effects of quantum mechanics.

Way to escape topic, bravo, Like a real troll. I can only imagine what space exploration would be like if escaping the earth's gravity was that easy.

But yeah, since you want to discuss definitions, here's one for you:

quan·tum  (kwŏn′təm)
n. pl. quan·ta (-tə)
1. Physics
a. The smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, especially a discrete quantity of electromagnetic radiation.
b. This amount of energy regarded as a unit.
2. A quantity or amount.
3. A specified portion.
4. Something that can be counted or measured.
5. A unit of acetylcholine, released at the synaptic cleft of a neuromuscular junction.


And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.

Can't you just give her that and be happy having a quantummechanical brain?

Never.. Never in my quantumphysical life
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2016, 01:35:24 PM »
And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.

Sure, it's made up of all those pieces. Everything is, you don't go around talking about your quantum chair unless you're a pretentious college drop-out with a distinctly lowered life expectancy.

I'm sorry your brain is the smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, but you can't keep taking it out on everyone else.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2016, 02:37:35 PM »
And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.

Sure, it's made up of all those pieces. Everything is, you don't go around talking about your quantum chair unless you're a pretentious college drop-out with a distinctly lowered life expectancy.

I'm sorry your brain is the smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, but you can't keep taking it out on everyone else.

If my chair could superposition I would
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2016, 02:21:55 AM »
And the brain is made of all these undivisable pieces and the most amazing part of the brain structure is that all these pieces are combined in such a way that can use superposition as a tool to solve problems. And superposition is something very familiar in quantum phyics, electricity, mechanics ect. Have you heard of schrødringers cat? I could go on but I just wanted to explain why I wrote quantum brain. And I still think I was right.

Sure, it's made up of all those pieces. Everything is, you don't go around talking about your quantum chair unless you're a pretentious college drop-out with a distinctly lowered life expectancy.

I'm sorry your brain is the smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, but you can't keep taking it out on everyone else.

If my chair could superposition I would

A lot of your chair can. There'll be electrons in its makeup, for example.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2016, 04:48:09 AM »

 you don't go around talking about your quantum chair

If my chair could superposition I would

A lot of your chair can. There'll be electrons in its makeup, for example.

I think that if my chair behaved like a quantum wave function I would notice.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2016, 05:23:22 AM »
I think that if my chair behaved like a quantum wave function I would notice.
Parts of it do, so evidently that's not the case.

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2016, 05:39:58 AM »
Parts of it do, so evidently that's not the case.

Yeah, but so does parts of your skin but that doesn't mean your skin is intelligent. You see?
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2016, 05:43:23 AM »
Parts of it do, so evidently that's not the case.

Yeah, but so does parts of your skin but that doesn't mean your skin is intelligent. You see?

When have I ever claimed it means that?

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sircool

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2016, 05:58:10 AM »
Parts of it do, so evidently that's not the case.

Yeah, but so does parts of your skin but that doesn't mean your skin is intelligent. You see?

When have I ever claimed it means that?

I didn't say you claimed that.

What I am saying is that there's a difference between a brain and a chair. The brain can use quantum superposition to generate thoughts, the chair can not. That's why I called it the quantum brain.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2016, 08:22:33 AM »
What I am saying is that there's a difference between a brain and a chair. The brain can use quantum superposition to generate thoughts, the chair can not. That's why I called it the quantum brain.
Sure, I'm just saying that the only particularly unique trait you're referring to is the 'generating thoughts,' not the 'quantum superposition.' Pretty much anything made out of matter is going to have parts capable of quantum superposition, appending 'quantum' just because is both technically true and unutterably silly.

Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2016, 08:41:00 AM »
What I am saying is that there's a difference between a brain and a chair. The brain can use quantum superposition to generate thoughts, the chair can not. That's why I called it the quantum brain.
Sure, I'm just saying that the only particularly unique trait you're referring to is the 'generating thoughts,' not the 'quantum superposition.' Pretty much anything made out of matter is going to have parts capable of quantum superposition, appending 'quantum' just because is both technically true and unutterably silly.

He's right you know. The neurons in your brain can actually get into superposition and this is a quantumphyical phenomenon.

Picture yourself trying to run through a parking lot blindfolded, you'd crash pretty early. But if you could superposition, then infinitely many versions of you would run at the same time, exploring every possible journey through the lot. And once one of you got through, you'd be there.

The same is true for neurons, this is how they communicate to solve problems. So in a sence, the brain is a quantum computer.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 08:44:32 AM by Kogelblitz »
Earth is flat, but Jupiter is the flattest planet in our solar system.

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Slemon

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2016, 10:01:23 AM »
He's right you know. The neurons in your brain can actually get into superposition and this is a quantumphyical phenomenon.
I've never said that wasn't the case.

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FalseProphet

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2016, 10:29:49 AM »
What do thoughts consist of? Are they quantum superpositions?

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rabinoz

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2016, 03:28:15 AM »
GR can't explain gravity waves.  Why do you think that you are so much smarter than Einstein?
Just interesting that you come out with a bald statement like this, and even after all this time, don't try to justify it when it's proved false, as in:
Quote from: What is a gravitational wave?
from: http://www.physics.org/article-questions.asp?id=138
A gravitational wave is a concept predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. General relativity states that mass distorts both space and time in the same way a heavy bowling ball will distort a trampoline.

When an object accelerates, it creates ripples in space-time, just like a boat causes ripples in a pond (and also similarly an accelerating electrical charge produces an electromagnetic wave). These space-time ripples are gravitational waves. They are extremely weak so are very difficult to detect. Missions like LISA or LIGO hope to spot gravitation waves detecting small changes in the distances between objects at set distances; satellites for LISA and mirrors for LIGO. As the strength of the wave depends on the mass of the object our best hope of detecting gravitational waves comes from detecting two black holes or pulsars collapsing into each other.
There are numerous other references.
Quote from: Gravitational wave
in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_wave
In physics, gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of spacetime which propagate as waves, travelling outward from the source. Predicted in 1916 by Albert Einstein on the basis of his theory of general relativity, gravitational waves transport energy as gravitational radiation.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2016, 04:02:13 AM »
Predicting something is not the same as explaining it.  ::)

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rabinoz

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Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2016, 04:23:40 AM »
Predicting something is not the same as explaining it.  ::)
I suppose you want a
tensor analysis of the fields defined on a Lorentzian manifold around spiraling black holes.
Well tough luck - I wouldn't have a clue what I was talking about!
But, just how would GR have predicted Gravitational Waves without an explanation of the cause of them.
Surely if Einstein saw that Gravitational Waves were a consequence of GR, the GR is able to explain them!

Re: How does the UA model explain gravity waves.
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2016, 06:14:19 PM »
jane confirmed jroa a troll.

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