OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ

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OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« on: November 19, 2006, 01:23:04 PM »
It's written that the moon is very small and only 3000 miles above the surface, and is 32 miles in diameter. But why when looked through a telescope it looks big and detailed, covered with craters, mountains, mesas and so on?

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Masterchef

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OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2006, 01:40:07 PM »
When you look at the moon through a telescope, you are really seeing a detailed painting that was put there by the government to fool you.

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skeptical scientist

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Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2006, 02:12:06 PM »
Quote from: "Zvezdichko"
It's written that the moon is very small and only 3000 miles above the surface, and is 32 miles in diameter. But why when looked through a telescope it looks big and detailed, covered with craters, mountains, mesas and so on?

Why shouldn't you be able to see craters and elevation variations across a 32 mile object? They just aren't as big as you think they are.
-David
E pur si muove!

Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2006, 02:18:38 PM »
Quote from: "skeptical scientist"
Quote from: "Zvezdichko"
It's written that the moon is very small and only 3000 miles above the surface, and is 32 miles in diameter. But why when looked through a telescope it looks big and detailed, covered with craters, mountains, mesas and so on?

Why shouldn't you be able to see craters and elevation variations across a 32 mile object? They just aren't as big as you think they are.


Let's add the "fact" that the moon has its own light source we can see. Where is it?

OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2006, 03:54:51 PM »
^In FE theory, the moon is 32 miles across.
he earth is a giant frisbee being thrown around the universe by George Bush and Zeus.

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Erasmus

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OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2006, 04:12:46 PM »
Check this out:



Some pretty amazing terrain, huh?  You've got mountains, ridges, deep valleys, etc.  Now look at the scale... it's in microns.  It's an image taken by an Atomic force microscope.

Small objects can still have very complex surface features.
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

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skeptical scientist

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Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2006, 05:39:58 PM »
Quote from: "Zvezdichko"
Let's add the "fact" that the moon has its own light source we can see. Where is it?

It does not. It sun shines and reflects off of the earth (mostly the oceans), and then the moon shines with reflected light from the surface of the earth. The phases of the moon are caused by the moon moving into regions of increased reflectivity (over oceans) and decreased reflectivity (over land and cloud formations).
-David
E pur si muove!

Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2006, 06:53:56 PM »
Quote from: "skeptical scientist"
Quote from: "Zvezdichko"
Let's add the "fact" that the moon has its own light source we can see. Where is it?

It does not. It sun shines and reflects off of the earth (mostly the oceans), and then the moon shines with reflected light from the surface of the earth. The phases of the moon are caused by the moon moving into regions of increased reflectivity (over oceans) and decreased reflectivity (over land and cloud formations).


From the FAQ:
Quote
Each functions as a "spotlight," with the sun radiating "hot light," the moon "cold light."


So yes, in FE, the moon generates it's own light.

Quote
Some pretty amazing terrain, huh? You've got mountains, ridges, deep valleys, etc. Now look at the scale... it's in microns. It's an image taken by an Atomic force microscope.

Small objects can still have very complex surface features.


An amateur telescope does not have anywhere near the magnification power of an AFM, so there's no way that it's showing you microscopic mountains.
atttttttup was right when he said joseph bloom is right, The Engineer is a douchebag.

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EnragedPenguin

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Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2006, 07:12:48 PM »
Quote from: "phaseshifter"
From the FAQ:
Quote
Each functions as a "spotlight," with the sun radiating "hot light," the moon "cold light."


So yes, in FE, the moon generates it's own light.


Quote from: "The FAQ also"

Q: "What about Lunar Eclipses"

(Possible A) The moon isn't a spotlight; it glows with light from the sun, reflected off the Earth. Different parts of the Earth are more reflective than others (the seas, the polar cap, the ice wall, for example). Sometimes, the position of the sun (which is a spotlight) means that only very low-reflective or non-reflective parts of the Earth's surface are illuminated, so the moon is abnormally dark. This could potentially explain lunar phases as well.



The flat Earth theory, like the round Earth theory, is a work in progress. We sometimes propose more than one explanation for certain phenomena.
A different world cannot be built by indifferent people.

OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2006, 09:12:48 PM »
Quote from: "Jveritas8"
^In FE theory, the moon is 32 miles across.


FE theory's relation to the real world is fictional.

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Dioptimus Drime

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OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2006, 09:34:18 PM »
Quote from: "mbrooksay"
Quote from: "Jveritas8"
^In FE theory, the moon is 32 miles across.


FE theory's relation to the real world is fictional.

That has nothing to do with the given circumstances. Stick with the discussion at hand, not at whatever discussion you may be having with yourself.


~D-Draw

Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2006, 11:19:37 PM »
Quote from: "EnragedPenguin"
Quote from: "phaseshifter"
From the FAQ:
Quote
Each functions as a "spotlight," with the sun radiating "hot light," the moon "cold light."


So yes, in FE, the moon generates it's own light.


Quote from: "The FAQ also"

Q: "What about Lunar Eclipses"

(Possible A) The moon isn't a spotlight; it glows with light from the sun, reflected off the Earth. Different parts of the Earth are more reflective than others (the seas, the polar cap, the ice wall, for example). Sometimes, the position of the sun (which is a spotlight) means that only very low-reflective or non-reflective parts of the Earth's surface are illuminated, so the moon is abnormally dark. This could potentially explain lunar phases as well.



The flat Earth theory, like the round Earth theory, is a work in progress. We sometimes propose more than one explanation for certain phenomena.


Re isn't in progress, as no one is currently engaged in the process of demonstrating that the earth is a sphere, and there is only one explanation for moonlight.

In any case, that doesn't make any sense, if the sun alone is a spotlight and the moon isn't, how does a disc shaped sun manages to illuminate the moon completely, seeing as it's a spherical object level with it?
atttttttup was right when he said joseph bloom is right, The Engineer is a douchebag.

Re: OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2006, 11:45:38 PM »
Quote from: "phaseshifter"
Quote from: "EnragedPenguin"
Quote from: "phaseshifter"
From the FAQ:
Quote
Each functions as a "spotlight," with the sun radiating "hot light," the moon "cold light."


So yes, in FE, the moon generates it's own light.


Quote from: "The FAQ also"

Q: "What about Lunar Eclipses"

(Possible A) The moon isn't a spotlight; it glows with light from the sun, reflected off the Earth. Different parts of the Earth are more reflective than others (the seas, the polar cap, the ice wall, for example). Sometimes, the position of the sun (which is a spotlight) means that only very low-reflective or non-reflective parts of the Earth's surface are illuminated, so the moon is abnormally dark. This could potentially explain lunar phases as well.



The flat Earth theory, like the round Earth theory, is a work in progress. We sometimes propose more than one explanation for certain phenomena.


Re isn't in progress, as no one is currently engaged in the process of demonstrating that the earth is a sphere, and there is only one explanation for moonlight.

In any case, that doesn't make any sense, if the sun alone is a spotlight and the moon isn't, how does a disc shaped sun manages to illuminate the moon completely, seeing as it's a spherical object level with it?

That's explained right after it says the moon isn't a spotlight!  The moon is illuminated by light reflected off the earth.

Which is not so reflective in places.

Perfectly circular places.
on't just believe anything.  Believe what seems right.

OH, yet another question concerning the FAQ
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2006, 01:05:47 AM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
Check this out:



Some pretty amazing terrain, huh?  You've got mountains, ridges, deep valleys, etc.  Now look at the scale... it's in microns.  It's an image taken by an Atomic force microscope.

Small objects can still have very complex surface features.


It's a fake.
quot;Earth is flat because there is a conspiracy, and there is a conspiracy because the Earth is flat" - Makes sense, duh.

http://theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=2955.0