What's on the other side?

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What's on the other side?
« on: January 22, 2016, 12:49:16 AM »
The flat earth maps seem to show all the oceans and continents on one flat circular plate, surrounded by a wall of ice.

What's on the other side of that plate?

If I were to go out into my back garden right now and start digging a hole straight down, how far down could I dig, where would I end up and what would I find there? (assuming I can dig infinitely without tiring or wearing out my shovel).

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Re: What's on the other side?
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2016, 01:50:24 AM »
We have no way of knowing. Religious proponents might argue the firmament. I have in the past argued that given the flat earth model with a UN map and a gravitational force, there must be another moon below the earth to account for tides. In my current model, I would say that the question is somewhat meaningless - you would simply end up at a different point on the plane.
The illusion is shattered if we ask what goes on behind the scenes.

Re: What's on the other side?
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2016, 02:08:45 AM »
Quote
you would simply end up at a different point on the plane.
If by 'plane' you mean the surface of our world, then wouldn't that suggest a sphere?

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Re: What's on the other side?
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2016, 08:11:49 AM »
Quote
you would simply end up at a different point on the plane.
If by 'plane' you mean the surface of our world, then wouldn't that suggest a sphere?
There are several shapes that could suggest.
The illusion is shattered if we ask what goes on behind the scenes.

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TheEngineer

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Re: What's on the other side?
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2016, 03:57:54 PM »
The flat earth maps seem to show all the oceans and continents on one flat circular plate, surrounded by a wall of ice.

What's on the other side of that plate?
I would guess rocks.  And then space.


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
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