Is ISS a projection?

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ronxyz

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #150 on: December 13, 2015, 04:13:59 PM »
So you have physical proof of this? No you do not. You only believe and belief proves nothing.
Well played! You just described EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER POSTED!
So still waiting and waiting and waiting, you have nothing.
If the Earth is a ball why don't we fall off the bottom?

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JustThatOneGuy

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #151 on: December 13, 2015, 04:15:54 PM »
So you have physical proof of this? No you do not. You only believe and belief proves nothing.
Well played! You just described EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER POSTED!
So still waiting and waiting and waiting, you have nothing.
First off, what're you asking for physical proof of? Second off, how impatient are you? I got up to grab something to eat :|
Nah, I'm just here to correct your grammar. The Earth's still round, though.

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JustThatOneGuy

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #152 on: December 13, 2015, 04:25:18 PM »
I took the time to analyze the above images. They are all fake. The shuttle and iss are larger pixels than the moon background. If you are going to put fake images out there at least know what you are doing.
Isn't that the sun in the background, tho?
Nah, I'm just here to correct your grammar. The Earth's still round, though.

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JustThatOneGuy

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #153 on: December 13, 2015, 04:33:13 PM »
I took the time to find a computer program to with a lot of bias and no actual analysis analyze the above images. They are all fake. The shuttle and iss are larger pixels than the moon background. If you are going to put fake images out there at least know what you are doing.
Isn't that the sun in the background, tho?
Nah, I'm just here to correct your grammar. The Earth's still round, though.

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #154 on: December 13, 2015, 05:40:03 PM »
Look, buy a telescope, find out when the shuttle passes you, look at it. Oh wait, Im sure you are going deny it all and probably not going to do it.

You can't photoshop something anyone can see with a cheap telescope and google

You can supposedly see the ISS maneuvering around the night sky with your bare eyes. Why do you insist people see it through a telescope?  Did you know that it is not as easy to track a moving light in the sky as you make it out to be?  You might as well have suggested using a telescope to track a meteor.

Why didn't you trot this argument out when I was arguing this point with a FEer who claimed to have done just that (possibly Ichimaru?) You sided with his claims he had tracked it with a scope by hand. Make your mind up, bozo.
Founder member of the League Of Scientific Gentlemen and Mademoiselles des Connaissances.
I am pompous, self-righteous, thin skinned, and smug.

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ronxyz

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #155 on: December 13, 2015, 07:55:08 PM »
Ball people show me the ball Earth curve. There is no physical proof of the ball Earth theory, none. No curve not a ball, not a ball you cannot call the Earth a sphere.
If the Earth is a ball why don't we fall off the bottom?

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #156 on: December 13, 2015, 08:04:18 PM »
I am talking about the first image above, the one with the fake iss on a back drop of the sun. It is a pretty good job, but the iss has pixels about 10 percent larger. Close but no cigar. I check all the images in this post and all are compromised.

I am not saying who made the original, just that the images in this post are altered images. Give me the link to the original and I will check it out.
Nope.  They are still the same size.
You can not just just look at them on a poor monitor, you have to measure the pixels.
Perhaps you missed my previous post where I took a 12 pixel by 12 pixel area of the ISS and put it right next to the same amount of pixels from a completely different part of the pic at the same scale?  if there was a 10% difference as you claim it should be readily apparent in that image. 
Surely you can post an image showing where the pixels don't match up with those around them since if they were in fact 10% larger as you say then they should very quickly not match up with the surrounding image.
The red line was put on the margin of 2 pixels on the clean left of the image and than moved horizontally to the iss  area, about 10% pixel mismatch.

How did you manage to get the fuzzy boundaries between the pixels? Pixels are discrete values and have a sharply-defined, discrete size. When an image is overzoomed by multiples of 100% the boundaries between the pixels remain sharp. Did you perhaps capture an image of the overzoomed display, load that into your editing software, and then resize it instead of zooming further?

Here's what a small portion of this picture (from this post) looks like when zoomed in to 1200% in PhotoShop Elements 10, a screenshot taken, then the resulting image re-loaded into PSE and zoomed in by another 800%, then a screenshot is taken, saved as an image, and posted here.



Note the nice sharp edges on all the pixels. They're all obviously the same size, too.

Here's what that 1200% screen capture looks like when it is resized by 800% instead of zoomed to 800%.



This results in fuzzy pixel edges. This looks similar to what you were showing. Note that, because of the fuzzy edges, the darker pixels appear larger than the brighter ones, but they are actually the same size.

You can get a similar effect if you run a blur filter on the 1200% screenshot and then zoom in. Is that what you did?

Can you list the image you started with, the software you used used, and the exact steps you took that resulted in your image with fuzzy-edged pixels?

This also looks like the same scene as your image (see above), but, FYI, that's the shuttle, not the ISS, from the original picture. If you're going to act like you're an expert on this stuff, it would be more convincing if you have the details about what you're showing us right.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Luke 22:35-38

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Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #157 on: December 13, 2015, 09:17:01 PM »
I am talking about the first image above, the one with the fake iss on a back drop of the sun. It is a pretty good job, but the iss has pixels about 10 percent larger. Close but no cigar. I check all the images in this post and all are compromised.

I am not saying who made the original, just that the images in this post are altered images. Give me the link to the original and I will check it out.
Nope.  They are still the same size.
You can not just just look at them on a poor monitor, you have to measure the pixels.
Perhaps you missed my previous post where I took a 12 pixel by 12 pixel area of the ISS and put it right next to the same amount of pixels from a completely different part of the pic at the same scale?  if there was a 10% difference as you claim it should be readily apparent in that image. 
Surely you can post an image showing where the pixels don't match up with those around them since if they were in fact 10% larger as you say then they should very quickly not match up with the surrounding image.
The red line was put on the margin of 2 pixels on the clean left of the image and than moved horizontally to the iss  area, about 10% pixel mismatch.

How did you manage to get the fuzzy boundaries between the pixels? Pixels are discrete values and have a sharply-defined, discrete size. When an image is overzoomed by multiples of 100% the boundaries between the pixels remain sharp. Did you perhaps capture an image of the overzoomed display, load that into your editing software, and then resize it instead of zooming further?

Here's what a small portion of this picture (from this post) looks like when zoomed in to 1200% in PhotoShop Elements 10, a screenshot taken, then the resulting image re-loaded into PSE and zoomed in by another 800%, then a screenshot is taken, saved as an image, and posted here.



Note the nice sharp edges on all the pixels. They're all obviously the same size, too.

Here's what that 1200% screen capture looks like when it is resized by 800% instead of zoomed to 800%.



This results in fuzzy pixel edges. This looks similar to what you were showing. Note that, because of the fuzzy edges, the darker pixels appear larger than the brighter ones, but they are actually the same size.

You can get a similar effect if you run a blur filter on the 1200% screenshot and then zoom in. Is that what you did?

Can you list the image you started with, the software you used used, and the exact steps you took that resulted in your image with fuzzy-edged pixels?

This also looks like the same scene as your image (see above), but, FYI, that's the shuttle, not the ISS, from the original picture. If you're going to act like you're an expert on this stuff, it would be more convincing if you have the details about what you're showing us right.

Gotta love cumputer guys.
The Bible doesn't support a flat earth.

Scripture, facts, science, stats, and logic is how I argue.

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #158 on: December 22, 2015, 05:36:58 PM »
People answering ronxyz could take a look at his signature. That would help not being trolled.

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #159 on: December 28, 2015, 03:07:17 PM »
You can supposedly see the ISS maneuvering around the night sky with your bare eyes. Why do you insist people see it through a telescope?  Did you know that it is not as easy to track a moving light in the sky as you make it out to be?  You might as well have suggested using a telescope to track a meteor.
I was able to follow a plane with my telescope. It takes just few minutes for the plane to pass from one side to the other side of the horizon. For ISS case, it takes ~45 minutes from the moment it shows to the moment it dissapear.

Why to see through the telescope? Because you no longer see a light dot, but you receive a clear image of what is flying there.

This is how your argument fails. Again.

I find this really amusing: you are trying to change the topic in favour of FE model, you insult people and call images  photoshoped, but you never actually use your brain to solve the mystery of a moving light spot...


So funny to me the vast lies that must be told to hold up the absolutely fake ball model.  For example, this guy saying the ISS takes 45 minutes to go horizon to horizon.

1. This means you have never watched it with your eye or a telescope.

2. You don't understand the globe model

3. ISS takes 5-7 minutes to cross the sky

4. ISS is a fraud!

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #160 on: December 28, 2015, 10:54:12 PM »
Good job on ignoring the correction about the ~45min that I made later.

http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=65080.msg1736794#msg1736794

Go ahead, repost the mistake that I have made and ignore the fact that I have already commented it.

Re: Is ISS a projection?
« Reply #161 on: December 29, 2015, 09:00:49 PM »