Question about Circumferences/Distances

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Question about Circumferences/Distances
« on: November 05, 2015, 07:00:33 PM »
I'm writing a paper on the Flat Earth Society and I've been researching a lot about it. I think it's all fascinating, and I love looking into the rationales for every side of the shape-of-the-earth debate.

Here is a problem that stands out to me:
I've seen it mentioned that the circumference of the flat earth is approximately 78,000 miles.
That means that the circumference of the equator should be approximately 39,000 miles.
However, round earthers believe that the equator is about 24,900 miles in length.

I have two questions that I'd like to ask:
How do you explain such a great difference?
What should make me believe that the flat earthers have measured one of those things (circumference of the earth, or the circumference of the equator) more accurately than round earthers?

I'd also like to say that I have other questions, but I think it's typically beneficial to simplify posts.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2015, 12:43:48 AM »
I think you are confused.  Could you please quote the post that you are referring to?  The most basic of geometry tells us that a disk of a certain circumference would not have a midway circumference that is half of the whole.  The 2 in (pi*R2) tells you that it is not linear.  I think you are either making all of this up, or you have been fed some very bad information.  If I am wrong, then simply quoting the offending post will clear all of this up for us. 

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Master_Evar

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2015, 01:18:49 AM »
I think you are confused.  Could you please quote the post that you are referring to?  The most basic of geometry tells us that a disk of a certain circumference would not have a midway circumference that is half of the whole.  The 2 in (pi*R2) tells you that it is not linear.  I think you are either making all of this up, or you have been fed some very bad information.  If I am wrong, then simply quoting the offending post will clear all of this up for us.
I think you are confused.

I am not debating, just correcting your mistake now. You just gave the equation for the AREA of a circle, not the circumference. Circumference O = [tau]*r. A circle with half the r will have a circumference of O = [tau]*0.5r, which is half of [tau]*r.  The author did the right calculations.
Math is the language of the universe.

The inability to explain something is not proof of something else.

We don't speak for reality - we only observe it. An observation can have any cause, but it is still no more than just an observation.

When in doubt; sources!

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2015, 01:25:13 AM »
I am not too big to admit to a mistake, unlike many of the roundies who frequent this site.  Late night, little sleep, a few beers, and you know the rest.

Anyway, thank you for catching my mistake.  I'll quietly back out now. 

Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2015, 01:26:37 AM »
You assume those distances remain constant.

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sandokhan

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2015, 01:55:12 AM »
I've seen it mentioned that the circumference of the flat earth is approximately 78,000 miles.
That means that the circumference of the equator should be approximately 39,000 miles.
However, round earthers believe that the equator is about 24,900 miles in length.


Do not use the data mentioned in the official FE FAQ: it contains the wrong information.

Here is the correct FE map.




Here is the correct FE data.

RADIUS OF THE FLAT EARTH = 6356.21 KM

CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE FLAT EARTH = 39937.245 KM


Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2015, 02:06:34 AM »
I've seen it mentioned that the circumference of the flat earth is approximately 78,000 miles.
That means that the circumference of the equator should be approximately 39,000 miles.
However, round earthers believe that the equator is about 24,900 miles in length.


Do not use the data mentioned in the official FE FAQ: it contains the wrong information.

Here is the correct FE map.

Here is the correct FE data.

RADIUS OF THE FLAT EARTH = 6356.21 KM

CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE FLAT EARTH = 39937.245 KM
Not a correct map, as you know.

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LuggerSailor

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2015, 06:01:56 AM »
I've seen it mentioned that the circumference of the flat earth is approximately 78,000 miles.
That means that the circumference of the equator should be approximately 39,000 miles.
However, round earthers believe that the equator is about 24,900 miles in length.


Do not use the data mentioned in the official FE FAQ: it contains the wrong information.

Here is the correct FE map.........
Some made up Bollocks..


OK, now plot me a course to steer from Sydney to Santiago.
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Sailor and Navigator.

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zork

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Re: Question about Circumferences/Distances
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2015, 02:15:53 PM »

What should make me believe that the flat earthers have measured one of those things (circumference of the earth, or the circumference of the equator) more accurately than round earthers?

  FYI, there is no documentation that any flat earthers have ever measured such things. They just take some numbers they like and use them.
Rowbotham had bad eyesight
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http://thulescientific.com/Lynch%20Curvature%202008.pdf - Visually discerning the curvature of the Earth
http://thulescientific.com/TurbulentShipWakes_Lynch_AO_2005.pdf - Turbulent ship wakes:further evidence that the Earth is round.