Does water bend?

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Does water bend?
« on: September 16, 2015, 06:36:17 PM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?

Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2015, 07:32:53 PM »
Only if you are a Waterbender like Katara.


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JerkFace

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2015, 09:31:10 PM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?

Still water is always level.    Moving water is  generally NOT level.

The definition of level is,   level is at right angles to down.   On the surface of the earth, this means oceans follow the curvature of the earth.     But oceans arent mostly level,  there are waves and swells.



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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2015, 11:46:52 PM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?

Still water is always level.    Moving water is  generally NOT level.

The definition of level is,   level is at right angles to down.   On the surface of the earth, this means oceans follow the curvature of the earth.     But oceans arent mostly level,  there are waves and swells.

Yep, water is pulled towards wherever down is - and in the case of a round Earth, down is towards the collective center of gravity, which is towards the core of the Earth.

Water is not doing anything magic curving to the side of a "ball Earth", because that ball Earth is floating in space, and in space there really isn't any "up" or "down" (at least not in the sense that we imagine - though you could say that in the case Solar System,, "down" is towards the Sun, which is the center of gravity of the Solar System, and all the planets are falling "down" towards it, but we don't hit the Sun because....well...that would divert this into a discussion or orbits and orbital mechanics, and maybe someone else here can explain that part of it better than I could.)

But often I get the impression here that a lot of Flat Earthers imagine a ball Earth as like a basketball not floating in space, but suspended over a flat plane which has it's own gravity, and tha is not the case. The Earth is in space, the only "down" is towards the center of the Earth. And my "down" is different from your "down", because we are on a ball.

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chtwrone

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2015, 01:49:39 AM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?


You can believe in the flat earth model as much as you like, but the round earth model completely accounts for why there is water obscuring the hull of the ship in the picture below, due to the world's oceans following the curvature of the spherical earth.






And reference the flat earth model, were you aware that the model requires that the sun is only 3000 miles above the earth's surface?  If that is the case, how would you account for the picture below, which clearly shows the sun disappearing below the horizon line - it sure doesn't look to be 3000 miles above the surface of a completely flat earth does it?





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XaeXae

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2015, 03:35:16 AM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?


You can believe in the flat earth model as much as you like, but the round earth model completely accounts for why there is water obscuring the hull of the ship in the picture below, due to the world's oceans following the curvature of the spherical earth.






And reference the flat earth model, were you aware that the model requires that the sun is only 3000 miles above the earth's surface?  If that is the case, how would you account for the picture below, which clearly shows the sun disappearing below the horizon line - it sure doesn't look to be 3000 miles above the surface of a completely flat earth does it?



For the first one, waves are hiding a part of the boat.

And the second one is only an optical illusion caused by the bending of the light rays.

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chtwrone

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2015, 04:29:06 AM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?


You can believe in the flat earth model as much as you like, but the round earth model completely accounts for why there is water obscuring the hull of the ship in the picture below, due to the world's oceans following the curvature of the spherical earth.






And reference the flat earth model, were you aware that the model requires that the sun is only 3000 miles above the earth's surface?  If that is the case, how would you account for the picture below, which clearly shows the sun disappearing below the horizon line - it sure doesn't look to be 3000 miles above the surface of a completely flat earth does it?



For the first one, waves are hiding a part of the boat.

And the second one is only an optical illusion caused by the bending of the light rays.



Your suggestions are crap.

Firstly, the height of the top of the ship's hull above the water line would be close to 40 feet.  So you're expecting us to believe that on this reasonably placid section of sea, there are 40 foot waves obscuring the hull?

And secondly, how can light rays be bent a total distance of 3000 miles?  Yet more crap from a hopelessly ignorant flat earth fool.  You people just make shit up, to account for anything that doesn't fit your joke of a flat earth model.
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XaeXae

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2015, 06:45:38 AM »
I do believe in flat earth but since the oceans should show some curvature due to the earth being as a globe, does water bend or is there evidence that it does bend?


You can believe in the flat earth model as much as you like, but the round earth model completely accounts for why there is water obscuring the hull of the ship in the picture below, due to the world's oceans following the curvature of the spherical earth.






And reference the flat earth model, were you aware that the model requires that the sun is only 3000 miles above the earth's surface?  If that is the case, how would you account for the picture below, which clearly shows the sun disappearing below the horizon line - it sure doesn't look to be 3000 miles above the surface of a completely flat earth does it?



For the first one, waves are hiding a part of the boat.

And the second one is only an optical illusion caused by the bending of the light rays.



Your suggestions are crap.

Firstly, the height of the top of the ship's hull above the water line would be close to 40 feet.  So you're expecting us to believe that on this reasonably placid section of sea, there are 40 foot waves obscuring the hull?

And secondly, how can light rays be bent a total distance of 3000 miles?  Yet more crap from a hopelessly ignorant flat earth fool.  You people just make shit up, to account for anything that doesn't fit your joke of a flat earth model.

Actually, I'm a round-earther, and I wasn't seriously giving these as explanations, but only showing you that flat-earthers could use this type of arguments to prove you wrong. Even if these arguments are stupid.

Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2015, 12:21:31 PM »

Yeah, if the ridiculous "Flat Earth Model" was true, when the Sun was near the horizon it should be a lot smaller, and dimmer, and ALL of it should be above the horizon.

What's funny is how internally inconsistent the FILM is, they will claim some B.S. about light rays bending towards the Earth because of gravity, and then later go on to claim that gravity doesn't exist, only "density".

I believe in density to; I think Flat Earthers are very dense.

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sircool

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2015, 01:52:24 PM »
No you can't, it's a liquid. If you freeze it, maybe you'll bend it a little before it breaks.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science

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mikeman7918

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2015, 01:54:03 PM »
Here are some examples of water forming a curved surface other then the curvature of the Earth:







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JerkFace

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2015, 07:21:38 PM »
No you can't, it's a liquid. If you freeze it, maybe you'll bend it a little before it breaks.

No,  as a liquid,  it bends so easily it's almost impossible NOT to bend it.

Here is a video of water in zero gravity,  notice that it's almost perfectly spherical when undisturbed.....  now where did I see that  before....?   Oh wait.

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sircool

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Re: Does water bend?
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2015, 03:46:52 AM »
No you can't, it's a liquid. If you freeze it, maybe you'll bend it a little before it breaks.

No,  as a liquid,  it bends so easily it's almost impossible NOT to bend it.

Here is a video of water in zero gravity,  notice that it's almost perfectly spherical when undisturbed.....  now where did I see that  before....?   Oh wait.

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Yes, good point. But I was simply showing that the question is wrong. Fluids can't bend, the question makes no sence. Solid objects can bend, there are very accurate models of what happening on with molecular structures when something bends. Liquid water has no molecular structure, instead just lots of particles vibrating in what seems to be chaos. Take a plastic bag of water, bend it and molecules will not follow a bending pattern.
If it's flat, that would be very interesting for science