Disproof of gravity

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Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1380 on: July 07, 2016, 02:21:34 PM »
did you have any update on the dome project? If I missed it in the pages of ranting since this was brought up yesterday, I apologize.

This suggestion is from last fall, but I'll repeat it as a favor: if you're having trouble getting and holding a vacuum between the inner and outer domes, just defer that part. It will be difficult to do and won't affect the results in any meaningful way. You can thank me later.
I managed the dome and gap for evacuation of pressure. It consists of 62 - 12 inch pillars between both domes.
Outer dome is sprayed matt black with a black felt covering that is laquered externally to protect it from the weather wear of our weather system.

A few more months and it will be ready for testing out. It's looking rather good.

Cool!

You got pics of the build?  I would find them interesting.
I'll have the full  lot in a few months time, plus a working model that can be seen from all angles inside, complete with waterfalls and real growth. The only thing it will lack is small humans and elephants, etc. Greenery and energy source is all in hand.


Pictures and video will all follow in good time.

Aw, shoot! It's another "a few months time" and never "now". Maybe this one will be different. I'll ask again in a few months.

That was one year ago.

Here's a report from nine months before that saying it was 70% done.

Is it done yet? Any progress? Pictures?
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Rama Set

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Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1381 on: July 07, 2016, 05:07:49 PM »
Sceptimatic is the Anita Sarkeesian of pseudoscience.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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curiousGuy

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Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1382 on: July 07, 2016, 07:11:45 PM »
How far did you go during your studies?

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hello_there

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Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1383 on: July 07, 2016, 11:37:21 PM »
Here's a report from nine months before that saying it was 70% done.

And by here (with URL integrated to the word), Alpha2Omega is talking about sceptimatic stating this:
Try channeling your minds towards Earth anomalies and what not, then you may get a better understanding of the illusion we have been made to abide by.
Thanks scepti, I'm sure the world's scientific community will sit up and take notice.

Have you managed that diagram of how sunsets occur under your ice dome yet?
Yep. I'm also 70% into building of a dome with all the necessary stuff built into it, including small camera's set up inside of it. It's looking extremely promising.

All my drawings and pictures are done.

I learned from experience that some flat earthers can go as low as necessary to get out of sticky situations, potentially including editing posts from distant past, effectively expunging the original post. So I had to put it as a quote to eliminate that possibility.

Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1384 on: July 08, 2016, 02:15:05 PM »
Scepti, how does your model of the atom explain the photoelectric effect?
If you don't know what it is, it's that if you shine UV light on a negatively charged piece of metal, it loses its negative charge. Same thing doesn't happen if the metal has a positive charge, or if the light is visible instead of UV. Why is this, what is special about a negative charge compared to a positive one.
This is an easy thing to test with a gold leaf electroscope, as the loss of charge causes the leaf to fall.
http://www.gcsescience.com/pse4-electrostatic-gold-leaf-electroscope.htm
So what is it that makes a negatively charged metal different to a positively charged one.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2016, 02:21:07 PM by Empirical »

Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1385 on: July 08, 2016, 02:32:29 PM »
You can't simply push air away from something with your hand but you can with a fan and then your question is answered to the affirmative. As long as that fan has enough energy to force the air away to allow the tennis ball to rest on dense air as if it's floating.

Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air?
Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot.

So our hands can't push enough air to move a tennis ball, but our legs can push and displace enough air to get us moving on a swing. Makes sense.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2016, 02:34:43 PM by nexzus »

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sceptimatic

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Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1386 on: July 08, 2016, 03:30:42 PM »
You can't simply push air away from something with your hand but you can with a fan and then your question is answered to the affirmative. As long as that fan has enough energy to force the air away to allow the tennis ball to rest on dense air as if it's floating.

Why can I not fly the same way I can swing, by swimming through the air?
Because the swing takes your entire weight. All your flailing body has to do from that point is displace enough air to get you swinging.
Flying requires you to use your flailing body in such extremity to gain flight that you would literally have to buzz your arms at such a rate they would literally wear out in seconds, assuming you could magically do it, which we all know we cannot.

So our hands can't push enough air to move a tennis ball, but our legs can push and displace enough air to get us moving on a swing. Makes sense.
Sometimes it's best to read what's been said before you jump in.

Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1387 on: July 08, 2016, 03:57:28 PM »
Scepti, how does your model of the atom explain the photoelectric effect?
If you don't know what it is, it's that if you shine UV light on a negatively charged piece of metal, it loses its negative charge. Same thing doesn't happen if the metal has a positive charge, or if the light is visible instead of UV. Why is this, what is special about a negative charge compared to a positive one.
This is an easy thing to test with a gold leaf electroscope, as the loss of charge causes the leaf to fall.
http://www.gcsescience.com/pse4-electrostatic-gold-leaf-electroscope.htm
So what is it that makes a negatively charged metal different to a positively charged one.
Why aren't you answering.

Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1388 on: July 09, 2016, 06:54:44 PM »
Sometimes it's best to read what's been said before you jump in.

From one year ago:

I managed the dome and gap for evacuation of pressure. It consists of 62 - 12 inch pillars between both domes.
Outer dome is sprayed matt black with a black felt covering that is laquered externally to protect it from the weather wear of our weather system.

A few more months and it will be ready for testing out. It's looking rather good.

How did the tests go?
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Disproof of gravity
« Reply #1389 on: July 10, 2016, 01:21:28 AM »
Scepti, how does your model of the atom explain the photoelectric effect?
If you don't know what it is, it's that if you shine UV light on a negatively charged piece of metal, it loses its negative charge. Same thing doesn't happen if the metal has a positive charge, or if the light is visible instead of UV. Why is this, what is special about a negative charge compared to a positive one.
This is an easy thing to test with a gold leaf electroscope, as the loss of charge causes the leaf to fall.
http://www.gcsescience.com/pse4-electrostatic-gold-leaf-electroscope.htm
So what is it that makes a negatively charged metal different to a positively charged one.