Why doesn't the earth rip apart?

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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #60 on: January 24, 2015, 02:02:43 PM »
Since 90% don't really believe that the earth is flat and most of you are trolling this thread is pointless but could we get it back on topic?

I agree.

Earlier on, jroa said that he pushed "a cardboard box at as close to 9.8 m/s/s as I could estimate, and guess what?  It did not fall apart".

I responded that his cardboard box was a nominally rigid structure, all parts of which he was accelerating at an identical rate.  If he were to push one side of the box at a faster rate than the opposite side, the box would initially distort, and then ultimately collapse structurally because of the unequal applied forces.

I claim that because the summit of Mt Everest is accelerating at a different measured rate to the surface of the Sahara desert, then the Indian sub-continent would catastrophically separate from the African continent in a matter of seconds.  In other words, the planet could not maintain its structural integrity were differing levels of "universal acceleration" or UA applied to different parts of that structure.  Gravitational forces have been proven by instrumental measurements to be different at the summit of Mt Everest to that of (say) the Sahara desert.

How then can flat earthers reconcile this variation with their purported and constant UA and the scientific evidence for the phenomena known as gravity?  Or will they now claim that their notion of UA is totally incorrect, or at the least, proven to be somewhat inaccurate.

Could the flat earthers also please explain exactly how they determined the value of their UA without utilising round earth science;  who was the person who made the determination; and in what year was it made.  Citations would be appreciated.


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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #61 on: January 24, 2015, 02:28:39 PM »
Another point I'd like to raise is this:  Earlier on, Vauxhall agreed that a gravimeter was "one of the various ways to measure UA".  Which as far as it goes is true.

But... the the zero-length spring—and hence the gravimeter—were invented by Lucien LaCoste and Lucien LaCoste between 1932 and 1936.  Both these guys were round earth professors of physics (who also invented the modern seismograph) and neither of their biographies mentions anything at all about any doubts they may have held about the sphericity of the earth.  In fact, the development of both the gravimeter and the seismograph were predicated totally on the spherical geometry of the earth.

So... how can Vauxhall now claim to prove the flat earth principle of UA by using round earth instruments and 80-year-old round earth theory?

Surely any flat earther should dispute any claims, hypotheses, theories or inventions proposed by round earth science?  Or are flat earthers now prepared to accept some tenets of round earth science when and if it suits their cause?  Conversely, why has no flat earth scientist invented his/her own measuring device to confirm the unit value of UA?  Could not the round earth device be faulty, or deliberately rigged to give a false reading?

Finally, how can it be—that despite refuting all round earth scientists as liars and frauds and NWE shills—they seemingly fully accept the use of round earth instruments in an endeavour to prove flat earth theory?  It just doesn't make any sense does it?

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #62 on: July 01, 2015, 11:20:10 PM »
I'm sorry if this is necro, but this point is still relevant and the sole fact that the Earth isn't flat. 

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Slemon

  • Flat Earth Researcher
  • 11690
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #63 on: July 02, 2015, 06:34:05 AM »
I'm sorry if this is necro, but this point is still relevant and the sole fact that the Earth isn't flat.

To be fair, there are plenty of theories which don't rely on UA to explain gravity, so they do have a better way of answering. UA's just the standard, for some reason I can't fathom.

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11cookeaw1

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #64 on: July 02, 2015, 11:44:52 PM »
http://www.gnomeexperiment.com/
Here, as you can see there gravity is CONSISTENTLY greater at the poles.

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hoyhoy5

  • 72
  • Irrational disbelief is not critically thinking.
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #65 on: July 06, 2015, 03:41:45 PM »
Another thing to consider:

I actually calculated the values of UA and concluded that, in a bit less than a year (a bit more than 354 days, to be exact) UA would reach light speed. Obviously it couldn't accelerate more than the speed of light, if it could even reach it. Well, except if light speed is also part of the conspiracy.

Any answers to this probem?
When in doubt, remember RELM:
Rationality, Evidence, Logic and Math.

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Slemon

  • Flat Earth Researcher
  • 11690
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #66 on: July 06, 2015, 03:51:00 PM »
Another thing to consider:

I actually calculated the values of UA and concluded that, in a bit less than a year (a bit more than 354 days, to be exact) UA would reach light speed. Obviously it couldn't accelerate more than the speed of light, if it could even reach it. Well, except if light speed is also part of the conspiracy.

Any answers to this probem?

That's one of the few points at which FET does have a good answer. It's to do with relativity: at high speeds space essentially warps so, while from an external perspective you never reach the speed of light, from a frame of reference on the accelerating object, you're constantly accelerating.
It's a pain to think of anything involving relativity. Of course, the real question is why FEers believe it's true given their reliance on what can be observed.

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hoyhoy5

  • 72
  • Irrational disbelief is not critically thinking.
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #67 on: July 06, 2015, 04:06:35 PM »
Another thing to consider:

I actually calculated the values of UA and concluded that, in a bit less than a year (a bit more than 354 days, to be exact) UA would reach light speed. Obviously it couldn't accelerate more than the speed of light, if it could even reach it. Well, except if light speed is also part of the conspiracy.

Any answers to this probem?


That's one of the few points at which FET does have a good answer. It's to do with relativity: at high speeds space essentially warps so, while from an external perspective you never reach the speed of light, from a frame of reference on the accelerating object, you're constantly accelerating.
It's a pain to think of anything involving relativity. Of course, the real question is why FEers believe it's true given their reliance on what can be observed.

Well, I can't say I am an expert regarding space warping, but if that's so.

I remember that another thing warped due to velocities near light-speed is time. Of course, it would change nothing to us on Earth, as we are all sharing the same time experience, but surely would change relative to stars. How do stars behave in FET, regarding UA?
When in doubt, remember RELM:
Rationality, Evidence, Logic and Math.

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #68 on: July 06, 2015, 04:09:08 PM »
I have a box sitting on my table.  I pushed it at as close to 9.8 m/s/s as I could estimate, and guess what?  It did not fall apart.  Perhaps your peoples claim that a tiny fraction of that differential acceleration would rip the world apart is wrong, or is my  box really stronger than the world?

Acceleration means that it's constantly increasing.  Which would mean these fluctuations are constantly increasing.  Every second of every day.  So after years these would be massive differences.  How do you explain this?

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Slemon

  • Flat Earth Researcher
  • 11690
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #69 on: July 06, 2015, 04:11:54 PM »
I remember that another thing warped due to velocities near light-speed is time. Of course, it would change nothing to us on Earth, as we are all sharing the same time experience, but surely would change relative to stars. How do stars behave in FET, regarding UA?
Presumably they'd be accelerating at the same rate too, otherwise they'd long since have been left behind.

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hoyhoy5

  • 72
  • Irrational disbelief is not critically thinking.
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #70 on: July 06, 2015, 04:40:28 PM »
I remember that another thing warped due to velocities near light-speed is time. Of course, it would change nothing to us on Earth, as we are all sharing the same time experience, but surely would change relative to stars. How do stars behave in FET, regarding UA?
Presumably they'd be accelerating at the same rate too, otherwise they'd long since have been left behind.

Wait just there. Does relativity also explain why we percieve light as incredibly faster than anything we could percieve, even though we, in FET, are apparently traveling at 99.999999...% the speed of light? Or not?
When in doubt, remember RELM:
Rationality, Evidence, Logic and Math.

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guv

  • 1132
Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #71 on: July 06, 2015, 10:32:34 PM »
I remember that another thing warped due to velocities near light-speed is time. Of course, it would change nothing to us on Earth, as we are all sharing the same time experience, but surely would change relative to stars. How do stars behave in FET, regarding UA?
Presumably they'd be accelerating at the same rate too, otherwise they'd long since have been left behind.


In that case the moon shrimp would fall off and land down here. No full moon no lunatics no flatwits.