Another question for flat-earthers

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Another question for flat-earthers
« on: November 30, 2015, 02:37:46 PM »
I have a couple of questions, but may as well put them in separate threads so people answer them specifically and it doesn't just turn into a mosh of long rambling arguments.

If the earth is flat, why can't I see the sun shining on places where it's sunny?

It's night-time here in England, but I should be able to see the sun shining down on Australia if I look in the right direction shouldn't I?

Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2015, 03:07:02 PM »
If the earth is flat, why can't I see the sun shining on places where it's sunny?
---- because clouds block the sun. 

It's night-time here in England,
The clouds-over-England block the sun,

but I should be able to see the sun shining down on Australia if I look in the right direction shouldn't I?
No because the clouds block the sun. 



Next question?

Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2015, 03:16:01 PM »
On a clear cloudless night, why do I not always see the sun shining on where it's sunny?

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ronxyz

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Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2015, 03:47:56 PM »
I have a couple of questions, but may as well put them in separate threads so people answer them specifically and it doesn't just turn into a mosh of long rambling arguments.

If the earth is flat, why can't I see the sun shining on places where it's sunny?

It's night-time here in England, but I should be able to see the sun shining down on Australia if I look in the right direction shouldn't I?
Hello fefe,
It's night-time here in England, but I should be able to see the sun shining down on Australia if I look in the right direction shouldn't I?

The light given off by an object will dim the square of the distance away from it. There is some 10552 miles between the twos points. A major factor is also any obstacles between you and Australia over that 10552 miles. Atmosphere dust rain mountains buildings and etc.., these all diffuse or block light energy. The human eyes are made to detect and judge distance and the brain is most stubborn about doing it, hard coded. Instead of projecting a 2d image in your self a 3d version is produced. This makes things converge, come together as you look at them at distance. If you had a sensitive sun energy detector installed at a high place with an unobstructed view all around you may be able to do what you suggest. This would be a great project for an amateur scientist to try.
If the Earth is a ball why don't we fall off the bottom?

Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2015, 03:55:23 PM »
But you can literally watch the sun go down below the horizon until you can't see it any more.

It doesn't move away and dim, it goes down below the horizon. It is still a perfectly clear circle as it moves down below the horizon.

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ronxyz

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Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2015, 04:12:17 PM »
Your observation really answered your own question.
' It is still a perfectly clear circle as it moves down below the horizon.'
The horizon is just what your eyes telling you what it is, showing you, they are not capable of discerning convergence at great distance. That is why I suggested using a detector that is not optical.
If the Earth is a ball why don't we fall off the bottom?

Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2015, 04:19:09 PM »
Your observation really answered your own question.
' It is still a perfectly clear circle as it moves down below the horizon.'
The horizon is just what your eyes telling you what it is, showing you, they are not capable of discerning convergence at great distance. That is why I suggested using a detector that is not optical.

So you're saying that when something's really far away, my brain is telling me that it's actually moving somewhere else when really it's not going in that direction at all?

Then why don't I see the outlines of random mountains moving up in front of the sun?

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ronxyz

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Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2015, 04:49:33 PM »
Your observation really answered your own question.
' It is still a perfectly clear circle as it moves down below the horizon.'
The horizon is just what your eyes telling you what it is, showing you, they are not capable of discerning convergence at great distance. That is why I suggested using a detector that is not optical.

So you're saying that when something's really far away, my brain is telling me that it's actually moving somewhere else when really it's not going in that direction at all?

Then why don't I see the outlines of random mountains moving up in front of the sun?
I though you were being serious with your questions, but now you are just being silly. Nowhere did I say your eyes make things change directions. I explained what is taking place. Do some study on it using other sources on how the human eyes and mind work. It is easy ti find just have a look.

If the Earth is a ball why don't we fall off the bottom?

Re: Another question for flat-earthers
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2015, 05:06:08 PM »
I though you were being serious with your questions, but now you are just being silly. Nowhere did I say your eyes make things change directions. I explained what is taking place. Do some study on it using other sources on how the human eyes and mind work. It is easy ti find just have a look.

Please could you link me to a relevant source.

So are you saying that whole objects still appear as they are (i.e. the sun remains circular), but the difference between their distances causes them to appear differently in relation to one another?

I'm not being silly, I'm just curious how this would work, and if you could dumb it down for me and put it in as basic terms as possible that would help me understand what you are trying to explain.