Geology of a flat earth

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Scroto Gaggins

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Geology of a flat earth
« on: February 03, 2015, 03:46:36 AM »
Hi all,
I was just wondering what the internal mechanics are of a flat earth.
What is the depth of the earth? What is the composition?
Are there convection currents and similar? If so, where?

To preempt the inevitable "Oh, we can only answer one question at a time" , jroa and pongo, i'm okay if you only answer one.
I would like it if you took the time to answer more, but if i had it my way this forum wouldn't exist.
Thanks
They are taking the hobbits to Isengard.

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Pongo

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2015, 12:44:26 PM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dug the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2015, 06:24:06 AM by Pongo »

Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2015, 01:40:56 PM »
Tom Bishop claims it to be 17 metres thick.
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mikeman7918

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2015, 03:31:26 PM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

... But there is a model that can explain these things so well that it's used to predict weather, earthquakes, volcano eruptions, and more with incredible accuracy.  Making predictions is what makes a good model of the universe and the round Earth model certainly makes some good predictions.
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See the thread about it here.

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Scroto Gaggins

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2015, 02:54:29 AM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

But would it be possible to dig/tunnel to the other side?
And how deep is the earth? Is there any way to find this out?
They are taking the hobbits to Isengard.

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Slemon

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2015, 03:36:34 AM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

But would it be possible to dig/tunnel to the other side?
And how deep is the earth? Is there any way to find this out?
Seismology would probably be the best way to figure such things out, but equally that requires a bit more knowledge of the composition of the world. If we assume it's flat though, that should narrow things down enough we get a general idea.
To my knowledge seismology is just more evidence for RET, with what we see, but if you discard that idea than there could only be so many possibilities which are both realistic, and give what we observe.


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Pongo

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2015, 06:25:22 AM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

... But there is a model that can explain these things so well that it's used to predict weather, earthquakes, volcano eruptions, and more with incredible accuracy.  Making predictions is what makes a good model of the universe and the round Earth model certainly makes some good predictions.

Think about how much more accurate these predictions would be if they weren't forced into a round-earth box.

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Pongo

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2015, 06:26:49 AM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

But would it be possible to dig/tunnel to the other side?
And how deep is the earth? Is there any way to find this out?

Deep holes in the earth get pretty hot, I'm not sure if they are approaching a molten layer or the bottom of the earth.  Either way, the heat may be to great to ever dig to the other side.  We may never know.

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Scroto Gaggins

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2015, 03:58:23 PM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

But would it be possible to dig/tunnel to the other side?
And how deep is the earth? Is there any way to find this out?
So is there a molten layer?
If not, why does the tunnel get hot?

Deep holes in the earth get pretty hot, I'm not sure if they are approaching a molten layer or the bottom of the earth.  Either way, the heat may be to great to ever dig to the other side.  We may never know.
They are taking the hobbits to Isengard.

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Lemmiwinks

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2015, 07:57:50 AM »
The short answer is that we do not know.  No one has ever dig the bottom of the earth or repelled off the side (if that's even possible) so we cannot answer your questions.  Sorry if that's disappointing, but it's a lot better than a lie.

But would it be possible to dig/tunnel to the other side?
And how deep is the earth? Is there any way to find this out?

Deep holes in the earth get pretty hot, I'm not sure if they are approaching a molten layer or the bottom of the earth.  Either way, the heat may be to great to ever dig to the other side.  We may never know.

But, the reason that tunnels get hotter as you go down is perfectly explained in RE geology and is consistent with all other RE science. You don't have to say we may never know, we already know.
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robintex

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2015, 04:20:42 PM »
Tom Bishop claims it to be 17 metres thick.

There was also a video on another thread with this figure.
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Son of Orospu

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2015, 04:24:49 PM »
This is flat Earth Q&A.  If you do not have a question or answer about the flat Earth, then please refrain from posting here.

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Scroto Gaggins

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2015, 09:32:27 PM »
This is flat Earth Q&A.  If you do not have a question or answer about the flat Earth, then please refrain from posting here.
But is is theoretically possible to tunnel from one side of the earth to the other?
Or even to separate two parts of the world?
And, as has been previously posted, the underside is mostly rocky. How do you know this?
They are taking the hobbits to Isengard.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Geology of a flat earth
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2015, 05:48:48 AM »
I have said many times that I don't know what the underside of the Earth is like.  I can guess, if you want for me to do so, but that would just be a guess, not evidence.